Cooking With Kids

Posted on Thursday, August 13, 2015 by Larkspur

Photo of child's hands mixing doughSmall children are naturally curious about what goes on around them, and this extends to what is going on in their kitchens at home. After all, they see their parents make what may seem mysterious efforts to prepare meals and snacks, as they orchestrate over counters, the stove and in the oven. Most wee ones get started in the kitchen when they crawl to a lower cabinet door and pull out pots and pans with which to play. (I believe this is where their first music lessons happen as well – bang, bang, bang!) I know my two boys spent plenty of happy time on the kitchen floor with pots, wooden spoons and measuring cups, to name a few of the culinary tools they got to try early on. Continue reading “Cooking With Kids”

New DVD List: House of Cards Season 3 & More

Posted on Wednesday, August 12, 2015 by Dewey Decimal Diver

house of cards s3

Here is a new DVD list highlighting various titles in fiction and nonfiction recently added to the library’s collection.

house of cards season 3House of Cards
Season 3
Website / Reviews
Series 3 of the drama about a ruthless congressman and his equally ambitious wife who navigate the corridors of power in Washington, D.C. It begins with Frank as President of the United States after his recent inaugiration and continues with him trying to maintain a hold on his country.

 

Continue reading “New DVD List: House of Cards Season 3 & More”

Reader Review: The Little Paris Bookshop

Posted on Tuesday, August 11, 2015 by patron reviewer

Book cover for the Little Paris BookshopThe Little Paris Bookshop” is about the book seller, Jean Perdu, who sells only the correct books to his customers at his literary pharmacy. (This is a book shop on a barge on the Seine River in Paris.) Monsieur Perdu is able to “transperceive” each of his customers (and others) to prescribe the correct book to fix what ails them. He generously gives books away, but he is equally stern in refusing to sell the wrong book to a particular client. Success in his work life is juxtaposed against the anguish, loneliness and pain in his private life resulting from a severely unmendable broken heart. The mood is magical, the characters profound, the sensual presentation of the story causes one’s heart to move along the story line as if it were on a roller coaster. To accompany Jean Perdu on his life journey is a sublime experience. Continue reading “Reader Review: The Little Paris Bookshop”

Staff Book Review: Traitor’s Blade

Posted on Monday, August 10, 2015 by Dana

Book cover for Traitor's BladeTraitor’s Bladeby Sebastien De Castell

Why I Checked It Out: Three best friends, roaming the kingdom, looking for justice and purpose? With swords? I’m in.

What It’s About: In the European-esque, medieval setting, the Greatcoats greatly resemble Jedi Knights. These men and women are skilled warriors, but they are more concerned with upholding the King’s Law and keeping peace among all the ambitious dukes and duchesses of the land. Or at least they were, until the death of the King and the end of his enlightened law.

Now Falcio, Kest, Brasti and the rest of the Greatcoats are disgraced and scattered, taking what work they can and struggling to finish the enigmatic final tasks left to them by the King. Continue reading “Staff Book Review: Traitor’s Blade”

Take a Hike: Books About Long Walks

Posted on Friday, August 7, 2015 by Lauren

Book cover for A Walk in the Woods by Billy BrysonIn 2014, Reese Witherspoon starred in the movie adaptation of Cheryl Strayed’s “Wild,” her memoir of self-discovery and survival as she hiked the Pacific Crest Trail. This September, another movie about a long walk – this time along the Appalachian Trail – hits the big screen. “A Walk in the Woods” by Bill Bryson is a laugh-out-loud misadventure but also manages to share the trail’s history and argue eloquently for the preservation of our undeveloped forests, trails and parks. Read this funny travelogue before seeing the film this fall.

Want more books about long walks? Read on. Continue reading “Take a Hike: Books About Long Walks”

Reader Review: 2 A.M. at the Cat’s Pajamas

Posted on Thursday, August 6, 2015 by patron reviewer

Book cover for 2 am at the cats pajamas2 A.M. at the Cat’s Pajamas” follows several characters over the course of 24 hours. As the night ends they all end up at a local Jazz club called The Cats Pajamas! This is one of those books that I might have to go back and read closer to pick up things I have missed. It followed several characters in the course of a day/night and how all their lives connect. A quick read and interesting story. I am still not sure about one part of the ending, but I liked the book overall.

Three words that describe this book: charming, hope, loss

You might want to pick this book up if: If you enjoy the movie, “Love Actually,” you will like this book. If you like characters that are flawed and believable, you will like this book.

-Michelle

Genealogy Tips, Programs and How-to Books at Your Library

Posted on Wednesday, August 5, 2015 by Tim

Book cover for Finding Your RootsNew to researching your family’s history? The Daniel Boone Regional Library is a great place to start, especially if you would like some in-person guidance. If you pick up one of our current program guides, check the index for our genealogy classes, or check the schedule online. You’ll find current programs and drop-in help sessions to make your family tree grow! Besides programs, we have two online databases we’ve previously recommended on this blog – Heritage Quest and Ancestry Library Edition. And we have a reference collection containing all kinds of local history as well as genealogy how-to books.

If your ancestors were local to this area, we have lots of great books of interest, from county and city histories and maps to extractions of marriage records and cemetery records. We also have a complete run of the Columbia Daily Tribune on microfilm at our Columbia location that you can access to get an obituary, marriage announcement or even a family reunion article. Continue reading “Genealogy Tips, Programs and How-to Books at Your Library”

Reader Review: Still Life

Posted on Tuesday, August 4, 2015 by patron reviewer

Book cover for Still Life by Louise PennyStill Life” by Louise Penny introduces Chief Inspector Gamache. There is a death in the small rural village of Three Pines near Montreal in Canada. Chief Inspector Gamache is called in to investigate what was originally thought to be a hunting accident resulting in the death of an elderly school teacher who was loved by all of the villagers. The plot unfolds to actually be a murder investigation with many twists and turns. The key appears to be in the painting done by the victim, and Inspector Gamache has to figure it out.

Three words that describe this book: Intriguing, captivating, interesting.

You might want to pick this book up if: You enjoy mysteries and like to try to figure it out as you read!

-Linda

Tech for Teachers, Free @ DBRL

Posted on Friday, July 31, 2015 by Lauren

My librarian pal Hilary and I just had the pleasure of presenting to groups of area teachers, letting them know all about the free online learning tools for the kids they teach, as well as for their own professional development. The boatload of incredible information available to you if you have a library card and Internet access is pretty amazing. Here is just a handful of the online tools you should be using.

Lynda.com logoEducation and Elearning tools from Lynda.com
Want to take a course in deploying 1:1 iPads in the classroom? How about project-based learning or flipped classrooms? Need to get up to speed on a certain software, like Blackboard, Excel, Keynote or PowerPoint? These and so, so many more courses are available from Lynda.com. Your students can take courses, too, on topics like basic code-writing skills, time management, information literacy and research paper writing. Continue reading “Tech for Teachers, Free @ DBRL”

Reader Review: Maine

Posted on Thursday, July 30, 2015 by patron reviewer

maineMaine” is a story about three women, all related, who find themselves in different situations in their life but sharing their family vacation home in Maine. The women look back at events in their lives, how they’ve reacted to situations and built or destroyed relationships and what shaped them into the people they have become (or could have become if it weren’t for the structure and history of their family). This is a great summer read; the chapters are all built around the three main characters and move along at a quick pace. It’s a bit bittersweet, though, and not just because of the characters’ lives unraveling. It makes you realize that summer vacations come to an end, and we have to return to our lives. Continue reading “Reader Review: Maine”