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Fifth Summer Reading Gift Card Winner!

DBRL Next - July 9, 2016

TrophyCongratulations to Judy of Columbia on winning our fifth Adult Summer Reading 2016 prize drawing. She is the recipient of a $25 Barnes & Noble gift card.

If you have not registered for the library’s Adult Summer Reading program, you can still do so online or by visiting any of our locations. Once you sign up, you are automatically entered in the prize drawings. Also, don’t forget to submit book reviews to increase your odds of winning. (That’s what this week’s winner did!) There are plenty of drawings left this summer, so keep reading and sharing your reviews with us!

The post Fifth Summer Reading Gift Card Winner! appeared first on DBRL Next.

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In Memory of Elie Wiesel

Next Book Buzz - July 8, 2016

Book cover for Open Heart by Elie Wiesel“Indifference, to me, is the epitome of evil.”
~ Elie Wiesel (September 30, 1928 – July 2, 2016)

When, in 1990, at the age of 39, I emigrated from the USSR to the United States, I did not know about Elie Wiesel, Anne Frank and other victims — or survivors — of the Holocaust. In fact, I didn’t even know the term “Holocaust.” And not because I was a bad student who failed to learn it in school, but because the anti-Semitic politics of the Third Reich were not covered in our school curriculum and our mass media — not before or during WWII, or afterwards. As a result, the atrocities that were well known in the West were hardly mentioned in the East. There, coverage of WWII was dedicated to the bravery and suffering of Soviet troops and, until 1956, to Stalin’s military genius. So the mass killings of Jews — in Europe and Ukraine — did not qualify.

This is not to say that the Russian population had it easy. The war was devastating for the USSR. Overall, more than 26 million Russian citizens died during the war, not to mention those who came back as invalids and hopeless alcoholics. Still, the fact that the Jews were systematically exterminated was not revealed in Russia (where casual anti -Semitism was the norm) for a very long time. Well, we knew about concentration camps, including Auschwitz, Treblinka and Buchenwald. In fact, there was a popular song written about the latter, which went like this:

People of the world
stand up a moment
Listen, listen
It buzzes from all sides
It can be heard in Buchenwald
ringing off the bells
ringing off the bells
It’s innocent blood reborn and strengthened
In a brazen roar.
Victims are resurrected from the ashes …

Yet again, we were never told that the main goal of a camp like Auschwitz was the implementation of “The Final Solution of the Jewish Question.” Historians estimate that among the people sent to Auschwitz there were at least 1,100,000 Jews from all the countries of occupied Europe, over 140,000 Poles, approximately 20,000 Gypsies from several European countries, over 10,000 Soviet prisoners of war and over 10,000 prisoners of other nationalities.

Book cover for Night by Elie WieselWhen I found myself in Columbia, Missouri, and I had learned enough English to start reading, books about the Holocaust were not high on my list. First, I needed to learn about my adoptive country, its history, culture and customs. So, when one day (I was already working at the reference desk of the Columbia Public Library) a teenage girl came to me and asked about “The Diary of a Young Girl,” I had no idea what that book was about. I just looked it up in the library catalog. And later, when another patron was looking for “Night” by Elie Wiesel, I didn’t know anything about that book either. In fact, I had trouble spelling “Wiesel.”

Time went by, and I learned about the Holocaust, about Anne Frank and Elie Wiesel and others. I saw a collection of victims’ shoes in the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington (the Nazis confiscated their victims’ belongings and sent valuables back to Germany; the shoes were to be repaired by the camps’ prisoners and reused). And I heard a reading of names of the Jewish children murdered during the Holocaust (1.5 million names in all) in the Yad Vashem Children’s Memorial in Jerusalem, which is housed in an underground cave and lit by candles that, reflected in a system of mirrors, create the impression of millions of little stars. (The complex was built with donations from a family whose two-and-a-half-year-old son was killed in Auschwitz.) And when I read “Night,” I could hardly keep from screaming; for the way I felt, it all could have happened to me, my parents and my daughter.

There are some events so cruel and traumatic that people don’t want to talk about them, even less read about them. In fact, when Wiesel’s “Night” first appeared in print (in Yiddish) in 1954, its publication was hardly noticed. In America, when the book was published in 1960, it wasn’t an overnight success either. Gradually, though, it began attracting more attention, and when, in 2006, Oprah Winfrey presented “Night” to her book club, it became a New York Times bestseller.

Wiesel went on to write many more books and to become a Nobel Peace Prize laureate. Above all, he remained a voice for Holocaust victims and survivors – the mission he considered the most important in his life.

“If I survived,” Wiesel said in 1981, “It must be for some reason. I must do something with my life…because in my place, someone else could have been saved. And so I speak for that person.”

The post In Memory of Elie Wiesel appeared first on DBRL Next.

Categories: Book Buzz

In Memory of Elie Wiesel

DBRL Next - July 8, 2016

Book cover for Open Heart by Elie Wiesel“Indifference, to me, is the epitome of evil.”
~ Elie Wiesel (September 30, 1928 – July 2, 2016)

When, in 1990, at the age of 39, I emigrated from the USSR to the United States, I did not know about Elie Wiesel, Anne Frank and other victims — or survivors — of the Holocaust. In fact, I didn’t even know the term “Holocaust.” And not because I was a bad student who failed to learn it in school, but because the anti-Semitic politics of the Third Reich were not covered in our school curriculum and our mass media — not before or during WWII, or afterwards. As a result, the atrocities that were well known in the West were hardly mentioned in the East. There, coverage of WWII was dedicated to the bravery and suffering of Soviet troops and, until 1956, to Stalin’s military genius. So the mass killings of Jews — in Europe and Ukraine — did not qualify.

This is not to say that the Russian population had it easy. The war was devastating for the USSR. Overall, more than 26 million Russian citizens died during the war, not to mention those who came back as invalids and hopeless alcoholics. Still, the fact that the Jews were systematically exterminated was not revealed in Russia (where casual anti -Semitism was the norm) for a very long time. Well, we knew about concentration camps, including Auschwitz, Treblinka and Buchenwald. In fact, there was a popular song written about the latter, which went like this:

People of the world
stand up a moment
Listen, listen
It buzzes from all sides
It can be heard in Buchenwald
ringing off the bells
ringing off the bells
It’s innocent blood reborn and strengthened
In a brazen roar.
Victims are resurrected from the ashes …

Yet again, we were never told that the main goal of a camp like Auschwitz was the implementation of “The Final Solution of the Jewish Question.” Historians estimate that among the people sent to Auschwitz there were at least 1,100,000 Jews from all the countries of occupied Europe, over 140,000 Poles, approximately 20,000 Gypsies from several European countries, over 10,000 Soviet prisoners of war and over 10,000 prisoners of other nationalities.

Book cover for Night by Elie WieselWhen I found myself in Columbia, Missouri, and I had learned enough English to start reading, books about the Holocaust were not high on my list. First, I needed to learn about my adoptive country, its history, culture and customs. So, when one day (I was already working at the reference desk of the Columbia Public Library) a teenage girl came to me and asked about “The Diary of a Young Girl,” I had no idea what that book was about. I just looked it up in the library catalog. And later, when another patron was looking for “Night” by Elie Wiesel, I didn’t know anything about that book either. In fact, I had trouble spelling “Wiesel.”

Time went by, and I learned about the Holocaust, about Anne Frank and Elie Wiesel and others. I saw a collection of victims’ shoes in the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington (the Nazis confiscated their victims’ belongings and sent valuables back to Germany; the shoes were to be repaired by the camps’ prisoners and reused). And I heard a reading of names of the Jewish children murdered during the Holocaust (1.5 million names in all) in the Yad Vashem Children’s Memorial in Jerusalem, which is housed in an underground cave and lit by candles that, reflected in a system of mirrors, create the impression of millions of little stars. (The complex was built with donations from a family whose two-and-a-half-year-old son was killed in Auschwitz.) And when I read “Night,” I could hardly keep from screaming; for the way I felt, it all could have happened to me, my parents and my daughter.

There are some events so cruel and traumatic that people don’t want to talk about them, even less read about them. In fact, when Wiesel’s “Night” first appeared in print (in Yiddish) in 1954, its publication was hardly noticed. In America, when the book was published in 1960, it wasn’t an overnight success either. Gradually, though, it began attracting more attention, and when, in 2006, Oprah Winfrey presented “Night” to her book club, it became a New York Times bestseller.

Wiesel went on to write many more books and to become a Nobel Peace Prize laureate. Above all, he remained a voice for Holocaust victims and survivors – the mission he considered the most important in his life.

“If I survived,” Wiesel said in 1981, “It must be for some reason. I must do something with my life…because in my place, someone else could have been saved. And so I speak for that person.”

The post In Memory of Elie Wiesel appeared first on DBRL Next.

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Reminder for Summer Reading Finishers

DBRLTeen - July 8, 2016

Kindle FireAs part of the Teen Summer Reading Challenge, we have asked area young adults to read for 20 hours, share three book reviews and complete seven fun library-related activities. Beginning Tuesday, July 5, Summer Reading finishers can visit any of our three library branches or bookmobile stops and claim their free book. We will have a wide selection of juvenile and young adult titles for you to choose from.

Best of all, if you finish, your name will also be entered into a drawing for a free Kindle Fire! This program is ongoing through August 13, so there is still several weeks of good reading time left.

Originally published at Reminder for Summer Reading Finishers.

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Reader Review: Long Division

DBRL Next - July 7, 2016

long divisionThis book is about a 20-something woman who is an elementary school teacher. She is writing a book, sort of journal entry style, documenting the time in which she and her boyfriend are apart while he is in the military in Iraq. Hence the title “Long Division,” a double meaning with her school teacher job title and her long distance relationship. The book was a touch difficult for me to get into but after a few chapters, I fell in love with Annie and all her quirks. I love the relationship she found with an elderly woman in a nursing home and the depth of the relationship she had with her childhood friend. There was just the right balance of romanticism, cynicism and whimsy for my taste.

Three words that describe this book: utterly, totally, relatable

You might want to pick this book up if: You are a teacher, you have experienced restlessness, you have ever thought about getting a pet chicken 😉

-Kristen

The post Reader Review: Long Division appeared first on DBRL Next.

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Mini Memoir Writing Contest

One Read - July 6, 2016

“On Betty’s Journey, I have learned something I had not known: I am very strong, strong enough to stay, strong enough to go when the time comes. I am staying not to cling on, but because sometime, at least once, everyone should see someone through. All the way home.” – George Hodgman, “Bettyville”

Great minds only need simple tools by Antti KyllonenIn this year’s One Read selection, George Hodgman tells the story of returning to Paris, Missouri after working for years in New York City and finding both his hometown and his mother in extreme decline. The book is full of stories from his childhood, woven among his present-day struggles and triumphs as his mother’s caregiver – memories, events and conversations that formed the man he now is.

Taking inspiration from “Bettyville,” we invite you to write a personal essay of 250 words or less – a mini memoir – that recalls a pivotal event or interaction that significantly shaped your personality, crystalized your worldview, or otherwise echoed through the years of your life. The memory you choose may be a monumental moment – like the birth of a child or loss of a loved one – or seemingly small, but it should be a moment that stands for something important and from which you learned something about yourself.

Starting September 1, entries may be submitted using this form, mailed or dropped off at any library or bookmobile. (See full rules below for details.) Winning entries and honorable mentions will be published on this site and winners will receive a $25 book store gift card.

Entry Form

Entries are due by September 26. Participants must be age 16 or older and residents of Boone or Callaway Counties. Read on for complete contest rules.

Contest Rules Eligibility
  • The contest is open to those 16 years of age and older.
  • Participants must reside within the DBRL service area (Boone or Callaway County, Missouri).
Contest Deadline
  • Entries will be accepted through September 26, 2016. (Mailed entries must be postmarked by that date.)
Submission Requirements and Guidelines
  • One entry per individual.
  • Submissions must be 250 words or less in length.
  • Submissions must be in English.
  • Submissions must include writer’s name, age, address and email address or phone number for eligibility verification and contact purposes.
  • Entries must be in text format and typed.
  • Entries may be submitted through the online form or by mail (DBRL, ATTN: Kat/One Read Writing Contest, PO Box 1267, Columbia, MO 65205), or dropped off at a DBRL location.
  • Submissions must be original, unpublished works.
  • Each participant must be the sole author and exclusive owner of all right, title and interest in and to his or her submission.
  • DBRL’s publication and use of the submission in accordance with the terms set out herein will not infringe or violate the rights of any third party (including copyright), or require any payment to or consent/permission from any third party.
Content Restrictions
  • The submission must not contain any material that is inappropriate, indecent, profane, obscene, hateful, tortious, defamatory, slanderous or libelous.
  • The submission must not contain any material that promotes bigotry, racism, hatred or harm against any group or individual or promotes discrimination based on race, gender, religion, nationality, disability, sexual orientation or age.
  • The submission must not contain any material that is unlawful, in violation of or contrary to the laws or regulations in any jurisdiction where the submission is created.
  • The submission must not contain any commercial content that promotes any product or service of the sponsor or any third party.
Judging
  • Entries will be evaluated and the winners chosen based on vivid language, grammar, effectiveness of details chosen, and emotion evoked by the writing, as well as adherence to the guidelines outlined above.
  • Two winners will be announced by October 12.
  • Winning entries and those receiving honorable mentions will appear on the One Read website.
  • Winners will be notified by phone or email and will each receive a $20 bookstore gift certificate.

 

The post Mini Memoir Writing Contest appeared first on One Read.

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Get Gaming!

DBRL Next - July 6, 2016

Photo of gamers playing Settlers of Catan, photo by sewing puzzle via FlickrLooking for games to play with your kids and the thought of one more round of Candy Land makes you want to cry?  Desperate to pry the smartphone or the tablet away from your teens?  Tired of starting another game of Monopoly you know you’ll never finish?

Oh friends, I am about to change your world.

Table-top gaming is diverse and entertaining, ranging from dice and cards to miniatures and tiles.  Some can be played in 15 minutes and some may take hours, depending on what you’re looking for.

Games indirectly teach problem-solving skills, math, strategy and adapting to other players’ actions. There is also the etiquette of listening, taking turns and teaching new players the rules of the games.

You can find something for every age. There are games that focus on math and spatial skills and are appropriate for preschoolers. There are also games that are definitely NOT for children and make for a fun evening with your grown-up friends.

I love the social aspect of face-to-face gaming. My favorite kinds of table-top games are collaborative, where all the players work together for a common goal, like stopping the monster or curing the viral outbreak. These kinds of games teach teamwork, and we all win or we all lose, together.

Which is nice when you hate losing as much as I do.

Want to learn more?  Maybe try out some games?

On Friday, July 8, there will be two programs at the Columbia Public Library devoted to table-top gaming. The first, starting at 4:30 p.m., is a Q & A with game developers. Learn about the making of games, what makes a good system and how these games go from ideas to reality. Then, stick around for a special after-hours gaming session from 6 to 9 p.m.!  There will be dozens of games to play and plenty of people eager to share their knowledge.

Gamers are more than very pale hermits with headsets staring at computer screens or people huddled around a table in someone’s basement arguing over a rule book, surrounded by empty Mt. Dew bottles. Come have some fun, and you might discover your new favorite game.

photo credit: Settlers of Catan via photopin (license)

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Fourth Summer Reading Gift Card Winner!

DBRL Next - July 6, 2016

TrophyCongratulations to Margaret, a Callaway County Public Library patron, for winning our fourth Adult Summer Reading prize drawing.  She is the recipient of a $25 Well Read Books gift card.

All it takes to be entered into our weekly drawings is to sign up for Adult Summer Reading. You can do this at any of our branch locations or Bookmobile stops or register online.  Also, don’t forget that submitting book reviews increases your chances of winning.  There are plenty of chances left to win this summer, so keep those reviews coming.

The post Fourth Summer Reading Gift Card Winner! appeared first on DBRL Next.

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Reader Review: Better Off

DBRL Next - July 5, 2016

Book cover for better Off by Eric BrendeMore articles and experts are recommending we get away from screens and our technology addiction. Ever had a craving to live the low-technology, Amish-like lifestyle (without the religious doctrine)? “Better Off” is about a couple that tried it and all the benefits they reaped! They were worried it would be all about survival, but the shared workload created a natural camaraderie with their neighbors and natural exercise. They realized it’s in our current world where we are running in a gerbil wheel, trying to enjoy it. This should be the next One Read!!!

Three words that describe this book: transforming, anti-technology, discovery

You might want to pick this book up if: you always wondered if technology is making your life and relationships harder in this go-go-go society, or if you find peace gardening, crafting or socializing. You also might like it if you ever loved Laura Ingalls Wilder books.

-Shannyn

The post Reader Review: Better Off appeared first on DBRL Next.

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Project Teen: Chillin’ @ Your Library

DBRLTeen - July 5, 2016

Project Teen is a regular program hosted at each of our three library branches. We invite young adults ages 12-18 to join us for craft projects and snacks. In July, you can learn to channel your inner yogi, color in our grown-up coloring books  or enjoy retro crafts like Shrinky Dinks!

Yoga w BorderProject Teen: Chill at the Library
Friday, July 15 from Noon-1:30 p.m.
Callaway County Public Library
Ages 12-18. No registration required.

Project Teen: Yoga and Smoothies
Wednesday, July 27 from 1-2:30 p.m.
Columbia Public Library, Friends Room
Ages 12-18. Registration begins July 12. To sign up, please call (573) 443-3161.

Project Teen: Retro Crafts
Thursday, July 28 from 1-2:30 p.m.
Southern Boone County Public Library
Ages 12-18. No registration required.

Originally published at Project Teen: Chillin’ @ Your Library.

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Lend Me Your Ears: Outstanding Audiobooks

Next Book Buzz - July 1, 2016

The best audiobooks provide something readers could not create on their own through reading the text from a page. Narrators create worlds with their voices, crafting performances that leave us sitting in our parked cars, hesitant to stop listening. For your next road trip, check out some of these books on CD or downloadable audio to make the miles fly by. Or, make exercise or housework more bearable by entertaining your ears with a good story. (Book descriptions courtesy of their publishers.)

Audiobook cover for All the Old KnivesAll the Old Knives” by Olen Steinhauer (read by Ari Fliakos and Juliana Francis Kelly)
Available on CD and downloadable audio
Nine years ago, terrorists hijacked a plane in Vienna. Somehow, a rescue attempt staged from the inside went terribly wrong and everyone on board was killed.Members of the CIA stationed in Vienna during that time were witness to this terrible tragedy, gathering intel from their sources during those tense hours, assimilating facts from the ground with a series of texts coming from one of their agents inside the plane. Had their agent been compromised, and how?

Dead Wake by Erik LarsonDead Wake: The Last Crossing of the Lusitania” by Erik Larson (read by Scott Brick)
Available on CD and downloadable audio
This 100th-anniversary chronicle of the sinking of the Lusitania discusses the factors that led to the tragedy and the contributions of such figures as President Wilson, bookseller Charles Lauriat and architect Theodate Pope Riddle. A dramatic narration brings the details of this tragedy to crisp light.

Book cover for The Knockoff by Lucy SykesThe Knockoff” by Lucy Sykes and Jo Piazza (read by Katherine Kellgren)
Available on CD
The story of Imogen Tate, editor in chief of Glossy magazine, who finds her twentysomething former assistant Eve Morton plotting to knock Imogen off her pedestal, take over her job and reduce the magazine, famous for its lavish 768-page September issue, into an app. Kellgren expertly captures both Imogen’s elegant tone and Eve’s more fast-paced millennial-speak.

What If? Serious Scientific Answers to Absurd Hypothetical Questions” by Randall Munroe (read by Wil Wheaton)
Available on CD, downloadable audio and playaway
What if you tried to hit a baseball pitched at 90 percent the speed of light? How fast can you hit a speed bump while driving and live? If there was a robot apocalypse, how long would humanity last? In pursuit of answers, Munroe runs computer simulations, pores over stacks of declassified military research memos, solves differential equations, and consults with nuclear reactor operators. His responses are masterpieces of clarity and hilarity, and Wheaton’s humorous tone matches the content perfectly.

The post Lend Me Your Ears: Outstanding Audiobooks appeared first on DBRL Next.

Categories: Book Buzz

Lend Me Your Ears: Outstanding Audiobooks

DBRL Next - July 1, 2016

The best audiobooks provide something readers could not create on their own through reading the text from a page. Narrators create worlds with their voices, crafting performances that leave us sitting in our parked cars, hesitant to stop listening. For your next road trip, check out some of these books on CD or downloadable audio to make the miles fly by. Or, make exercise or housework more bearable by entertaining your ears with a good story. (Book descriptions courtesy of their publishers.)

Audiobook cover for All the Old KnivesAll the Old Knives” by Olen Steinhauer (read by Ari Fliakos and Juliana Francis Kelly)
Available on CD and downloadable audio
Nine years ago, terrorists hijacked a plane in Vienna. Somehow, a rescue attempt staged from the inside went terribly wrong and everyone on board was killed.Members of the CIA stationed in Vienna during that time were witness to this terrible tragedy, gathering intel from their sources during those tense hours, assimilating facts from the ground with a series of texts coming from one of their agents inside the plane. Had their agent been compromised, and how?

Dead Wake by Erik LarsonDead Wake: The Last Crossing of the Lusitania” by Erik Larson (read by Scott Brick)
Available on CD and downloadable audio
This 100th-anniversary chronicle of the sinking of the Lusitania discusses the factors that led to the tragedy and the contributions of such figures as President Wilson, bookseller Charles Lauriat and architect Theodate Pope Riddle. A dramatic narration brings the details of this tragedy to crisp light.

Book cover for The Knockoff by Lucy SykesThe Knockoff” by Lucy Sykes and Jo Piazza (read by Katherine Kellgren)
Available on CD
The story of Imogen Tate, editor in chief of Glossy magazine, who finds her twentysomething former assistant Eve Morton plotting to knock Imogen off her pedestal, take over her job and reduce the magazine, famous for its lavish 768-page September issue, into an app. Kellgren expertly captures both Imogen’s elegant tone and Eve’s more fast-paced millennial-speak.

What If? Serious Scientific Answers to Absurd Hypothetical Questions” by Randall Munroe (read by Wil Wheaton)
Available on CD, downloadable audio and playaway
What if you tried to hit a baseball pitched at 90 percent the speed of light? How fast can you hit a speed bump while driving and live? If there was a robot apocalypse, how long would humanity last? In pursuit of answers, Munroe runs computer simulations, pores over stacks of declassified military research memos, solves differential equations, and consults with nuclear reactor operators. His responses are masterpieces of clarity and hilarity, and Wheaton’s humorous tone matches the content perfectly.

The post Lend Me Your Ears: Outstanding Audiobooks appeared first on DBRL Next.

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Reader Review: Live Right and Find Happiness

DBRL Next - June 30, 2016

live right and find happinessDave Barry! His newspaper columns were great, and his books are even better. Little life lessons, with that twist of humor only Barry can convey. “Live Right and Find Happiness” was more of a reflective collection, speaking on cultural differences, the World Cup tour in 2014, a trip to Russia and how times have changed in terms parenting styles. Of course, you have the random blurb letter to family, everyday observations, technology, and all packed with humor. A great, light read, with eye-opening words, humility and family.

Three words that describe this book: humorous, heartfelt, eye-opening

You might want to pick this book up if: you are looking for a fun read. Dave Barry’s books are always guaranteed to be a great read, all based on his own personal life experiences with aging, parenting, work, travel and pet ownership.

-Brittany

The post Reader Review: Live Right and Find Happiness appeared first on DBRL Next.

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Summer Cooking (or How to Torment Your Kids)

DBRL Next - June 29, 2016

Book cover for Love & LemonsThe extra downtime for our kids over the summer means that we, the parents, get to use them in the name of furthering their education. Every summer, we make them plan a menu for one night a week. They help with the shopping and estimate how much it will cost (even if we are still the ones paying the bill). And then – my favorite part – they cook and clean up afterwards! It’s pure bliss to have some of that responsibility of what to cook lifted off my shoulders, and they get to learn valuable skills. That’s how I rationalize it, anyway.

I recently brought home some new cookbooks – which were met with a few groans – but it wasn’t long before I was hearing, “Hey, this looks good!” I’m really looking forward to the crustless tomato-ricotta pie in “Gluten-Free: Easy & Delicious Recipes for Every Meal.” Fresh tomatoes from the farmers market and eggs from our backyard chickens should make it incredible! And the flourless chocolate hazelnut cake? Yum!

I haven’t heard any firm commitments yet to any of the recipes in “The Love & Lemons Cookbook: An Apple-to-zucchini Celebration of Impromptu Cooking,” but I think I love this cookbook. It’s very pretty and may end up having to be a purchase. Every recipe tells whether it is vegan or gluten-free, and most seem to be adaptable if needed. I’m not certain I’m quite ready to try the dark chocolate avocado mousse, but if the kids are willing to make it, I will be brave enough to eat it. I will be voting for the grilled peach salad with toasted pistachios or the cucumber, basil and watermelon salad!

Book cover for Endless Summer CookbookHow can you go wrong with a cookbook titled “Endless Summer Cookbook“? This is another stunningly beautiful cookbook. The fish tacos with creamy chipotle sauce and pico de gallo look wonderful! We never imagined that we would like fish tacos, but after trying some a few years ago, we love them. The hoisin ginger pork chops look great, too.

I also brought home “The Eli’s Cheesecake Cookbook: Remarkable Recipes from a Chicago Legend.” I really want to try the lemon cheesecake tart with blueberries, but the honey almond pistachio ricotta cheesecake looks wonderful, too! And now I’m really hungry.

I have been very impressed with what these kids have been able to make all by themselves. They have ventured into Korean, Indian, Chinese and Italian foods, as well as good old homemade barbecue. Some of my favorite summer recipes have been discovered this way! Not everything they have tried has been a keeper, but topping our list of favorites is the chilled berry soup from Mollie Katzen’s “Moosewood Cookbook.” My son has become the cheesecake chef of the family, even managing to alter recipes to fit his sister’s gluten-free diet. I think my personal favorite was the mandarin orange cheesecake from “The Cheesecake Bible,” but the kids would probably say that their favorite was the triple-chocolate cheesecake.

What a delicious summer! Please don’t let school start back up too soon!

The post Summer Cooking (or How to Torment Your Kids) appeared first on DBRL Next.

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Reader Review: Dead Man’s Folly

DBRL Next - June 28, 2016

dead mans follyI loved “Dead Man’s Folly!” Hercule Poirot is asked by his friend Ariadne Oliver to come visit her at Nasse House. She is planning a “murder hunt” for a garden fete, and she feels that there is something not quite right, but she can’t put her finger on it. In typical Agatha Christie fashion, a murder occurs, and Hercule Poirot sets out to find the killer! I loved this book. It is one of my favorite Poirot mysteries —I’ve read several. I have found a few to be boring, but not this one! I love the setting, plot, characters — everything really!

Three words that describe this book: gothic, absorbing, different

You might want to pick this book up if: you love Agatha Christie, especially if you love her little Belgian detective Hercule Poirot! He is my favorite character of all time!

-Anonymous

The post Reader Review: Dead Man’s Folly appeared first on DBRL Next.

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Third Summer Reading Gift Card Winner!

DBRL Next - June 28, 2016

TrophyCongratulations to Amy, a Southern Boone County Library patron, for winning our third Adult Summer Reading prize drawing.  She is the recipient of a $25 Barnes & Noble gift card.

All it takes to be entered into our weekly drawings is to sign up for Adult Summer Reading. You can do this at any of our branch locations or Bookmobile stops or register online.  Also, don’t forget that submitting book reviews increases your chances of winning.  There are plenty of chances left to win this summer, so keep those reviews coming.

The post Third Summer Reading Gift Card Winner! appeared first on DBRL Next.

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Couch to 5K: Books (and Other Resources)

DBRL Next - June 27, 2016

Book cover for Young Runners by Marc BloomThe popularity of the 5K running event is soaring these days. Nearly 8 million people competed in a 5K event during 2015 according to the official entity that keeps such statistics, Running USA.  That is a significant number of people pounding the pavement in pursuit of a personal running best. Probably the hardest thing about the process is actually getting started! Fortunately, there are many “couch to 5K” types of books to help.

My wife and I have two small children, ages 6 and 10, and we love running with them. I really enjoy it – an after-work two-miler with my kids is just what the doctor ordered. I get to spend time with my girls, and they get to stay fit and active. A great book about starting a running program for kids is titled: “Young Runners: The Complete Guide to Healthy Running for Kids From 5 to 18.” Some of the challenges facing young runners are age and growth specific injuries such as shin splints and knee pain. “Young Runners” outlines training programs so that kids can avoid these pitfalls, stay motivated and even run their first 5 or 10K.

Book cover for Train Like a MotherIn the midst of having kids and living a very busy life, my wife has run nearly a dozen 5K races and even a half marathon! A couple of books and other resources have really helped her stay motivated, including Kara Goucher’s excellent “Running for Women” and a subscription to Runner’s World. However, a number of books have recently been published that target the busy Mom runner specifically. “Train Like a Mother: How to Get Across any Finish Line – and not Lose Your Family, Job, or Sanity” by Dimity McDowell and Sarah Bowen Shea is one. Speaking of 5Ks, McDowell and Shea say the following:  “Many 5Ks cater to families with fun runs for younger kids and courses that older kids can tackle. You run, they run, and then . . . naptime for everyone in the afternoon.” Another recent entry in the canon is the book “See Mom Run: Every Mother’s Guide to Getting Fit and Running her First 5K” by Megan Searfoss.

Book cover for Runner's World Complete Book of RunningIf you want a good introduction to everything about running, try the “Runner’s World Complete Book of Running,” edited by Amby Burfoot. The most recent edition was published in 2009, and should be required reading for anyone starting a training regime.  In the chapter “Oprah Did it, So Can You,” Burfoot outlines how a personal trainer, some weight loss, and a lot of persistence actually sent Oprah Winfrey on her way to running a marathon in 1994. The book also has a lot of emphasis on choosing the right gear — mainly a pair of nice running shoes: “The great thing about running is that you only need one piece of equipment.” Choosing the right shoe can be a complicated and confusing affair with all the varieties out there to choose from, but Burfoot keeps the process simple and straightforward. To supplement this particular title, one might check out a suite of similar offerings, including “Runner’s World Complete Book of Women’s Running” and “Runner’s World Complete Book of Beginning Running.”

Finally, for the beginning AND the more experienced runners who want to get a little bit more from their training programs, there is the near classic and well reviewed “Galloway’s 5K and 10K Running.” Jeff Galloway’s training programs are all over the internet, but the book gives the reader quite a bit more depth and explains theory when discussing running technique and his very popular “walk/run” approach to fitness. Also, please see Galloway’s frequently updated website for revised training programs and other fresh offerings: www.jeffgalloway.com.

I exhort you to get out and start running!  Your body, mind and even your family will be the better for it. Seek out some of these resources to get started, and you will be on your way.

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A Healthy Mind

DBRL Next - June 24, 2016

World Tai Chi Day, photo by Brian Robinson via FlickrAt one point in my life, when I was feeling unmoored, I came across the book “PMS, Perimenopause, and You,” by Lori Futterman. Now what does a healthy mind have to do with PMS (premenstrual syndrome) and perimenopause, you ask?  Well, included in this helpful book, which takes a holistic approach to this stage in a woman’s life, is a very good definition of what it means to be healthy. And I quote Futterman: “You are healthy if you are able to do the things you want to, have a strong sense of calm, and are able to face unforeseen events that may be stressful with resolve and resourcefulness. You may achieve inner peace through meditation, religion, reflection, study of philosophy, or visualization.”

I found this definition so illuminating that I copied it and reread it over the years, whenever I needed reminding. Notice she emphasizes the need for a contemplative or meditation practice as a means to gain inner calm and strength, claiming it will aid in the ability to live life from a steady, confident and centered place. With that assertion in mind, I want to alert you to a program being offered and resources available here at the library, which focus on the development and maintenance of mental well-being through meditation. Fortunately, there are many types of meditation “practice,” which means there is something for everyone, depending on life approach, personal preference and ability.

First up, the library is offering a program on Tai Chi, both at the Columbia and Callaway County library locations. Tai chi can be described as meditation in motion, and it is an ancient, slow-motion Chinese martial art. This body-mind practice is suitable for all ages and levels of physical ability, and it addresses many components of physical fitness (muscle strength, flexibility, balance, etc.), but one of its important aims is to foster a calm and tranquil mind. Tai chi can also be helpful for a host of medical conditions, including arthritis, heart disease, hypertension, stroke and sleep problems, among others. Clearly tai chi has a lot to offer, and if you’d like to give it a try, please plan to attend one of the above mentioned programs.

Meditate, photo by Caleb Roenigk via FlickrLike tai chi, yoga can also be described as a form of meditation in motion. This practice of physical postures combined with conscious breathing originated in ancient India, and it aims to integrate body, mind and spirit. Historically its purpose was to move one toward attaining enlightenment, but even if this is not a “goal” for you, there are many benefits to be realized from a yoga practice. Physical benefits include increased muscle strength, flexibility and protection from injury. Mental benefits include increased mental clarity and calmness, a greater ability to focus and concentrate attention, and it can also aid in reducing anxiety and/or depression. Yoga is also suitable for people of all ages and levels of physical ability.

Sitting meditation, another ancient practice, can be undertaken with the aim of building inner strength and tranquility. There are numerous forms of meditation that employ different techniques, but for the same purpose — to train the mind to pay attention to what is happening in the present moment, and thereby become aware of the mind’s behavior and tendencies. Research has shown how meditation affects the brain and has uncovered many benefits, including improving the ability to focus and concentrate attention, improving memory, reducing stress, anxiety and depression, enhancing creativity and developing compassion. That is quite a lot to offer!

This pithy little book, “Start Here Now: an Open-hearted Guide to the Path and Practice of Meditation” by Susan Pivers, provides straightforward explanations and instructions that demystify meditation (in case you were mystified), making it very accessible to beginners.  There is a treasure trove of books here at the library, both in print and audio, with explanations and instructions on how to meditate. And there are a few organizations in our local area that offer group sitting opportunities and meditation instruction, for those interested in taking a class:  Show Me Dharma, Mindfulness Practice Center and Silent Mind-Open Heart.

“Even when in the midst of disturbance, the stillness of the mind can offer sanctuary.”
― Stephen Richards, The Ultimate Cosmic Ordering Meditation

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Reader Review: The Starter Wife

DBRL Next - June 23, 2016

the starter wifeThe Starter Wife” is about Gracie, a woman in a situation where she really doesn’t belong, fit in, or want to be. She tries with somewhat sincere effort to be a part of the Hollywood “Wife of” scene, and we readers get a peek with clarity, caring and pretty consistent humor! After a shocking text message, her life begins a journey to…she doesn’t know where! I liked Gracie and the narrative, which shared an interesting time in her life. This book is well written and moves with ease from page to page, and I really liked getting a look at the challenges and strife of a Hollywood wife’s life — it looks pretty, but it’s not.

Three words that describe this book: wife, life, Hollywood

You might want to pick this book up if: you like to read clever books, like to learn about different types of lives and, well, just pick it up cause it is good!!

-Pamela

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Blood Relations: Docs Featuring Families In Crisis

DBRL Next - June 22, 2016

tarnation imageFamilies can go into crisis mode when faced with stressful situations. How will family members deal with the situation and how will it transform their relationships with each other? Check out these docs that focus on families in a state of crisis.

tarnationTarnation” (2005)

Part documentary, part narrative fiction, part home movie, and part acid trip. Faced with the haunting remnants of his past, including a family legacy of mental illness, abuse and neglect, Jonathan Caouette returns home to aid in his schizophrenic mother’s recovery.

dear zacharyDear Zachary” (2008)

Filmmaker Kurt Kuenne begins making a film for Zachary, son of his oldest friend who was murdered by Zachary’s mother. The film’s focus shifts to Zachary’s grandparents as they fight to win custody of Zachary from the woman who took their son’s life.

prodigal sonsProdigal Sons” (2010)

Returning home to Montana for her high school reunion, filmmaker Kimberly Reed (previously the school quarterback and now a transgender woman) hopes for reconciliation with her long-estranged adopted brother. But along the way they face challenges no one could imagine.

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