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Reader Review: A Tree Grows in Brooklyn

DBRL Next - September 5, 2014

Editor’s note: This review was submitted by a library patron during the 2014 Adult Summer Reading program. We will continue to periodically share some of these reviews throughout the year.

Book cover for A Tree Grows in Brooklyn by Betty SmithA Tree Grows in Brooklyn” is about life, family and resilience in the early 1900s (In Brooklyn). Despite the departure in time and location from my present existence, it resonated with me. Smith’s character development was rich and truthful. Characters were not portrayed as foes or heroines, just people. It’s nice to read something without an overt slant or agenda or predictable plot.

Three words that describe this book: genuine, rich, fulfilling

You might want to pick this book up if: you love people and how they interact. This is a story of resilience.

-Anonymous

The post Reader Review: A Tree Grows in Brooklyn appeared first on DBRL Next.

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Books for Dudes – Every Day

DBRLTeen - September 5, 2014

Every Day,” by David Leviathan, challenges how we think of a main protagonist. This story is about A, who wakes up in a different body every single day. A tries to live each person’s life as they would or, at the very least, to not interfere at all and go unnoticed.  A is a unique character, as there’s no real assigned gender – sometimes A is a boy, sometimes A is a girl. Both genders feel natural.

Every Day, by David LevithanWhile every day is different, A’s life has a certain regularity until falling for a girl named Rhiannon. After making this fateful connection, A’s life changes…whether boy or girl, A tries to get whatever body being inhabited back to spend time with Rhiannon, telling her the secret of A’s life…and A wants Rhiannon to love him/her every day, regardless of whose body is being inhabited.

Obviously, this relationship doesn’t make things easy for Rhiannon, as she tries to adjust to seeing a different face every day. In addition to the romantic conflict, a mysterious reverend is trying to find out more about A, and the “why” infuses the story with an increased sense of danger and urgency.

This story really made me think about A’s predicament. If you go to Amazon or Goodreads, A is assigned a “he,” although in the story itself, there’s no assigned gender. A has been switching bodies every day since birth. And how would it feel to inhabit the body of someone else, even someone we knew, for a day? Would we be tempted  to nose around in people’s lives, to make changes?  Could we possibly still value their privacy, as A tries to do?

Every Day” is not easy (you’ll be pondering all sorts of scenarios in this book), but it is a really good read. I would love to know what happens next at the end of this novel, which usually is one indicator of a good story. Check it out and see what you think!

Originally published at Books for Dudes – Every Day.

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Voting Begins for “Teens’ Top Ten”

Teen Book Buzz - September 3, 2014

Vote for the “Teens’ Top Ten!”

The “Teens’ Top Ten” is a list of recommended reading sponsored by the Young Adult Library Services Association. In fact, it’s the only reading list with titles nominated and voted on by teens.

How does it work?

  • Sixteen young adult book clubs from libraries nationwide are responsible for narrowing down a list of nominees for teens to consider. (Does your book club want to get involved? Learn how.)
  • Based on the recommendations of these teen book clubs, the list of this year’s 28 nominees was announced in April during National Library Week.
  • Throughout the summer months, teens are encouraged to read as many of these titles as humanly possible.
  • Readers ages 12-18 are invited to vote on their three favorite books through September 15.
  • During Teen Read Week, October 12-18, the 10 most popular titles will be announced as the official 2014 “Teens’ Top Ten” list. Don’t forget to subscribe to our blog updates to have this and other teen book news delivered to your email inbox!

Originally published at Voting Begins for “Teens’ Top Ten”.

Categories: Book Buzz

Voting Begins for “Teens’ Top Ten”

DBRLTeen - September 3, 2014

Vote for the “Teens’ Top Ten!”

The “Teens’ Top Ten” is a list of recommended reading sponsored by the Young Adult Library Services Association. In fact, it’s the only reading list with titles nominated and voted on by teens.

How does it work?

  • Sixteen young adult book clubs from libraries nationwide are responsible for narrowing down a list of nominees for teens to consider. (Does your book club want to get involved? Learn how.)
  • Based on the recommendations of these teen book clubs, the list of this year’s 28 nominees was announced in April during National Library Week.
  • Throughout the summer months, teens are encouraged to read as many of these titles as humanly possible.
  • Readers ages 12-18 are invited to vote on their three favorite books through September 15.
  • During Teen Read Week, October 12-18, the 10 most popular titles will be announced as the official 2014 “Teens’ Top Ten” list. Don’t forget to subscribe to our blog updates to have this and other teen book news delivered to your email inbox!

Originally published at Voting Begins for “Teens’ Top Ten”.

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One Read Film Events — September 2014

Center Aisle Cinema - September 2, 2014

Daniel Boone Regional Library is sponsoring various films this month in conjunction with the One Read program. This year’s book is The Boys in the Boat by Daniel Brown, which is a  is an uplifting and fast-paced Cinderella story.

europa

The Rape of Europa” 
Friday, September 5, 2014 • 7-9:30 p.m.
106 Lefevre Hall, University of Missouri

As part of our exploration of the 1930s during this year’s One Read program, view this fascinating documentary which uses historic footage and interviews to tell the epic story of the destruction, theft and rescue of the great artworks of Europe during World War II. As Nazis loot and pillage, those dedicated to saving the art do everything in their power to protect it, including emptying the Louvre and evacuating the Hermitage. Directed by Richard Berge, Bonni Cohen and Nicole Newnham and narrated by Joan Allen. The film will be introduced by the Museum of Art and Archaeology’s director, Alex Barker.

monumentsmenMonuments Men” 
Tuesday, September 9, 2014 • 7 p.m.
William Woods University Library Auditorium

Based on a true story, this feature film follows a World War II platoon as they track down art stolen by the Nazis and return the masterpieces to their rightful owners. Following the film, Dr. Greg Smith, WWU associate professor of English and film, will lead a discussion about the movie and the University of Washington’s crew team’s experiences at the 1936 Berlin Olympic games, as recounted in this year’s One Read selection, “The Boys in the Boat.”

glickman

Glickman
Wednesday, September 17, 2014 • 6:30 p.m.
Columbia Public Library – Friends Room

Before Bob Costas, there was Marty Glickman. A gifted Jewish-American athlete who was denied the chance to represent the U.S. at the 1936 Berlin Olympics, he went on to become one of the most revered and influential sportscasters in history, pioneering many of the techniques, phrases and programming innovations that are commonplace in sports reporting today. This HBO documentary directed by James L. Freedman is a companion to our One Read book, “The Boys in the Boat,” a story of the U.S. crew team 1936 Olympics.

kingofthehill

King of the Hill
Monday, September 22, 2014 • 5:30 p.m.
Ragtag Cinema, 10 Hitt St.

As part of One Read, enjoy a free screening of the historical drama “King of the Hill,” directed by Steven Soderbergh. This film, shot in St. Louis and set in the 1930s, Depression-era Midwest, contains echos of Joe Rantz, the central character of “The Boys in the Boat.” It follows a young boy as he struggles on his own in a run-down motel after his parents and younger brother are separated from him. (Rated PG-13, 103 min.)

 

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New DVD: “Maidentrip”

Center Aisle Cinema - August 25, 2014

maidentrip

We recently added “Maidentrip” to the DBRL collection. The film was shown last year at the Citizen Jane Film Festival and currently has a rating of 82% from audiences at Rotten Tomatoes. Here’s a synopsis from our catalog:

Fourteen-year-old Laura Dekker sets out, camera in hand, on a two-year voyage in pursuit of her dream to be the youngest person ever to sail around the world alone. In the wake of a year-long battle with Dutch authorities that sparked a global storm of media scrutiny, Laura now finds herself far from land, family and unwanted attention, exploring the world in search of freedom, adventure, and distant dreams of her early youth at sea.

Check out the film trailer or the official film site for more info.

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Docs Around Town: Aug. 22 – Aug. 28

Center Aisle Cinema - August 21, 2014

ifyoubuildit

August 27: If You Build It” 5:30 p.m. at  Ragtag, free. (via)

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New DVD: “Is the Man Who Is Tall Happy?”

Center Aisle Cinema - August 18, 2014

isthemanwhoistallhappy

We recently added “Is the Man Who Is Tall Happy” to the DBRL collection. The film was shown earlier this year at Ragtag Cinema and currently has a rating of 91% from critics at Rotten Tomatoes. Here’s a synopsis from our catalog:

An animated documentary on the life of controversial MIT professor, philosopher, linguist, anti-war activist and political firebrand Noam Chomsky. Through complex, lively conversations with Chomsky and brilliant illustrations by Gondry himself, the film reveals the life and work of the father of modern linguistics while also exploring his theories on the emergence of language.

An animated documentary on the life of controversial MIT professor, philosopher, linguist, anti-war activist and political firebrand Noam Chomsky. Through complex, lively conversations with Chomsky and brilliant illustrations by Gondry himself, the film reveals the life and work of the father of modern linguistics while also exploring his theories on the emergence of language. – See more at: http://dbrl.bibliocommons.com/item/show/577581018_is_the_man_who_is_tall_happy#sthash.59NCeRDk.dpuf Roger Ross Williams explores the role of the American Evangelical movement in fueling Uganda’s terrifying turn towards biblical law and the proposed death penalty for homosexuality. Thanks to charismatic religious leaders and a well-financed campaign, these draconian new laws and the politicians that peddle them are winning over the Ugandan public. But these dangerous policies and the money that fuels them are coming from American’s largest megachurches. – See more at: http://dbrl.bibliocommons.com/item/show/559029018_god_loves_uganda#sthash.hmxmLNTm.dpuf Roger Ross Williams explores the role of the American Evangelical movement in fueling Uganda’s terrifying turn towards biblical law and the proposed death penalty for homosexuality. Thanks to charismatic religious leaders and a well-financed campaign, these draconian new laws and the politicians that peddle them are winning over the Ugandan public. But these dangerous policies and the money that fuels them are coming from American’s largest megachurches. – See more at: http://dbrl.bibliocommons.com/item/show/559029018_god_loves_uganda#sthash.hmxmLNTm.dpuf

Check out the film trailer or the official film site for more info.

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