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Docs Around Town: Apr. 4 – Apr. 10

Center Aisle Cinema - April 3, 2014

whywefight

April 9: “Welcome to Shelbyville” 6:30 p.m. at Columbia Public Library, free. (via)
April 9: Why We Fight” 7:00 p.m. at Boone County Government Center, free. (via)

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2014 Teen Book Champion Is Chosen!

Teen Book Buzz - April 2, 2014

Book-Tourney-graphic-2014After two months of nail-biting competition, central Missouri teens have selected their March Madness Teen Book Tournament Champion. We began with a list of 32 finalists which included bestsellers such as “Delirium” by Lauren Oliver, “Legend” by Marie Lu, and many Gateway and Truman Award nominees. Many thanks to the teachers and school librarians who have supported this program, and to all the teens who have participated! And now, the 2014 Champion is….

The Hobbit” by J.R.R. Tolkien

Stay tuned to teens.dbrl.org for our sneak peek at this year’s teen summer reading challenge, Spark a Reaction. Through this program, the library challenges young adults to read for 20 hours, share three book reviews, and do seven of our suggested activities. Complete the challenge, and you will be eligible to win some pretty awesome prizes. Stay informed by subscribing to our email updates!

Originally published at 2014 Teen Book Champion Is Chosen!.

Categories: Book Buzz

2014 Teen Book Champion Is Chosen!

DBRLTeen - April 2, 2014

Book-Tourney-graphic-2014After two months of nail-biting competition, central Missouri teens have selected their March Madness Teen Book Tournament Champion. We began with a list of 32 finalists which included bestsellers such as “Delirium” by Lauren Oliver, “Legend” by Marie Lu, and many Gateway and Truman Award nominees. Many thanks to the teachers and school librarians who have supported this program, and to all the teens who have participated! And now, the 2014 Champion is….

The Hobbit” by J.R.R. Tolkien

Stay tuned to teens.dbrl.org for our sneak peek at this year’s teen summer reading challenge, Spark a Reaction. Through this program, the library challenges young adults to read for 20 hours, share three book reviews, and do seven of our suggested activities. Complete the challenge, and you will be eligible to win some pretty awesome prizes. Stay informed by subscribing to our email updates!

Originally published at 2014 Teen Book Champion Is Chosen!.

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“Welcome to Shelbyville” on April 9th

Center Aisle Cinema - April 2, 2014
welcometoshelbyville Wednesday, April 9 › 6:30-8:30 p.m. Columbia Public Library, Friends Room

Join us for a special showing of “Welcome to Shelbyville” (Film is 50 min., rated PG.) at Columbia Public Library. The film is co-sponsored by Missouri Immigrant & Refugee Advocates as part of the photo exhibit “The Missouri Immigrant Experience: Faces and Places” April 5–25 at the Columbia Public Library.  Here’s a synopsis from their facebook page:

Change has come to rural Tennessee. Set against the backdrop of a shaky economy, “Welcome to Shelbyville” takes an intimate look at a southern town as its residents – whites and African Americans, Latinos and Somalis – grapple with their beliefs, their histories, and their evolving ways of life. “Welcome to Shelbyville” is directed and produced by Kim Snyder and executive produced by BeCause Foundation in association with Active Voice.

Check out the official film site for more info. While this film is not part of the monthly Center Aisle Cinema series, we’d still encourage you to attend.

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Autism Is Near You

DBRL Next - April 2, 2014

Autism Awareness Month, graphic by Kentucky National Guard Public Affairs Office, via Flickr and used under a Creative Commons licenseChances are you know someone with autism.  That’s because it is very prevalent – one in 88 births in the United States with a higher rate for boys (one in 54).  Autism is a developmental disability with a neurological basis and is considered a spectrum disorder, affecting individuals to varying degrees, from mild to severe.  Autism limits a person’s ability to communicate and interact with others.  Certain behaviors are characteristic of and define this disorder.

This  heart wrenching article that appeared in the New York Times gives you an inkling of the herculean efforts family members make in order to understand and support their children with autism.

April is National Autism Awareness Month! Considering the relatively great number of individuals and families impacted by this disorder and the fact that lifetime supports are needed to help them, it makes sense to educate the public about issues those with autism face and encourage fundraising to further research on this disability. Increased awareness brings acceptance, which is vital to the integration of the differently-abled into our communities.

Here in Columbia, Missouri we have a phenomenal resource – The Thompson Center for Autism and Neurodevelopmental Disorders at the University of Missouri. This nationally renowned facility seeks to improve the lives of those affected by autism and other neurological disorders via programs that integrate research, clinical service delivery, education and public policy. Life Skills/TouchPoint is another local organization that provides training and support services to those with autism and their family members.

Your library has extensive collections on both autism and Asperger’s Syndrome (a milder form of autism), that include books on parenting those with autism, alternative treatments, guides for teachers in the classroom, memoirs written by those on the spectrum and so on.  If you would like to join a local event supporting research and families dealing with this disorder, William Woods University is sponsoring a 5K run on Friday, April 18 in Columbia, and the funds raised will benefit the Thompson Center.

Photo credit: Graphic from the Kentucky National Guard Public Affairs Office and used under a Creative Commons License.

The post Autism Is Near You appeared first on DBRL Next.

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New DVD: Birders

Center Aisle Cinema - March 31, 2014

birders

We recently added “Birders: The Central Park Effect” to the DBRL collection. The film played on HBO in 2012 and currently has a rating of 100% from critics at Rotten Tomatoes. Here’s a synopsis from the film’s imdb page:

Birders: The Central Park Effect reveals the extraordinary array of wild birds who grace Manhattan’s celebrated patch of green and the equally colorful, full-of-attitude New Yorkers who schedule their lives around the rhythms of migration. Acclaimed author Jonathan Franzen, an idiosyncratic trombone technician, a charming fashion-averse teenager, and a bird-tour leader who’s recorded every sighting she’s made since the 1940s are among the film’s cast of characters. Featuring spectacular wildlife footage capturing the changing seasons, this lyrical documentary transports the viewer to a dazzling world that goes all but unnoticed by the 38 million people who visit America’s most famous park each year.

Check out the film trailer or the official film site for more info.

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Wild and Woody: Two Incredible Tree Stories for Arbor Day

Next Book Buzz - March 31, 2014

Book cover for The Wild Trees by Richard PrestonEven with my deep love for all things tall, green and leafy, I won’t generally pull out a book about trees to read for entertainment.  (Give me a good murder mystery for that.) So I’m pleased to report that I have just read two nonfiction books that were thoroughly entertaining, sometimes even hair-raising – and definitely about trees.

In “The Wild Trees” (Richard Preston, 2007), the author takes us deep into the lives and minds of the original redwood canopy researchers – young men (and a few women) who, starting in the early 1990s, were the first to climb into the tops of the largest trees on earth. There they discovered a fairyland of plant and animal species, many previously unknown to science, and galvanized efforts to protect our remaining redwood forests.

This all sounds like good clean science fun, but in fact it requires both Olympic-level agility and astonishing bravery. The early canopy-climbers faced a gruesome death pretty much every day, and shocking close calls abound in this book. Publication of “The Wild Trees rightfully made Steve Sillett, the graduate student (now professor) who is at the center of the story, an international folk hero in the ecological community.

Book cover for The Man Who Planted Trees by Jim RobbinsThe hero of “The Man Who Planted Trees (Jim Robbins, 2012) is just as brave and adventurous – but in his own weird way. In 1991, David Milarch - a fiftyish, bar-fighting Michigan tree farmer – had a near-death experience after quitting alcohol cold-turkey. As he relates it, while in heaven he was given an assignment (by an archangel, no less).  He was to save the planet from global warming by cloning the world’s oldest trees, which may provide the best genetic stock for reforestation as the climate changes.

Go ahead, scoff – but the man is doing it. Starting with no money, no college degree and no backers,  Milarch has built an internationally respected organization that is advancing the art and science of global reforestation. The name of his organization? Archangel Ancient Tree Archive. (Read a 2013 interview with David Milarch here.)

Finally, if you’re not into adrenaline or angels, here are several more good tree reads for Arbor Day, available at DBRL:

Seeds of Hope” (Jane Goodall, 2013)
Between Earth and Sky” (Nalini Nadcarni, 2008)
Wildwood” (Roger Deakin, 2009)
Teaching the Trees” (Joan Maloof, 2005)

The post Wild and Woody: Two Incredible Tree Stories for Arbor Day appeared first on DBRL Next.

Categories: Book Buzz

Wild and Woody: Two Incredible Tree Stories for Arbor Day

DBRL Next - March 31, 2014

Book cover for The Wild Trees by Richard PrestonEven with my deep love for all things tall, green and leafy, I won’t generally pull out a book about trees to read for entertainment.  (Give me a good murder mystery for that.) So I’m pleased to report that I have just read two nonfiction books that were thoroughly entertaining, sometimes even hair-raising – and definitely about trees.

In “The Wild Trees” (Richard Preston, 2007), the author takes us deep into the lives and minds of the original redwood canopy researchers – young men (and a few women) who, starting in the early 1990s, were the first to climb into the tops of the largest trees on earth. There they discovered a fairyland of plant and animal species, many previously unknown to science, and galvanized efforts to protect our remaining redwood forests.

This all sounds like good clean science fun, but in fact it requires both Olympic-level agility and astonishing bravery. The early canopy-climbers faced a gruesome death pretty much every day, and shocking close calls abound in this book. Publication of “The Wild Trees rightfully made Steve Sillett, the graduate student (now professor) who is at the center of the story, an international folk hero in the ecological community.

Book cover for The Man Who Planted Trees by Jim RobbinsThe hero of “The Man Who Planted Trees (Jim Robbins, 2012) is just as brave and adventurous – but in his own weird way. In 1991, David Milarch - a fiftyish, bar-fighting Michigan tree farmer – had a near-death experience after quitting alcohol cold-turkey. As he relates it, while in heaven he was given an assignment (by an archangel, no less).  He was to save the planet from global warming by cloning the world’s oldest trees, which may provide the best genetic stock for reforestation as the climate changes.

Go ahead, scoff – but the man is doing it. Starting with no money, no college degree and no backers,  Milarch has built an internationally respected organization that is advancing the art and science of global reforestation. The name of his organization? Archangel Ancient Tree Archive. (Read a 2013 interview with David Milarch here.)

Finally, if you’re not into adrenaline or angels, here are several more good tree reads for Arbor Day, available at DBRL:

Seeds of Hope” (Jane Goodall, 2013)
Between Earth and Sky” (Nalini Nadcarni, 2008)
Wildwood” (Roger Deakin, 2009)
Teaching the Trees” (Joan Maloof, 2005)

The post Wild and Woody: Two Incredible Tree Stories for Arbor Day appeared first on DBRL Next.

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