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Fitter, Happier, More Productive

DBRL Next - January 5, 2015

Book cover for Paddle Your Own Canoe by Nick OffermanBook cover for Promise Land by Jessica Lamb-ShapiroAnother year completed, another year begun. This is when we look behind us and say, “What was that all about?” while looking forward saying, “This time it will be different!” If you’re like me, this is also the time of year you take a long look in the mirror and say, “Grandpa?” To paraphrase the band They Might Be Giants, “We’re older than we’ve ever been, and now we’re even older.” We can’t hit the brakes on this process, and we can’t hit the reset button. Time waits for no one while it marches on like sands through the hourglass, or something. So we find our resolve, and we make promises we don’t keep, and we say to ourselves, “This time it will be different. We will eat better and get in shape. We will get a hobby, learn a skill or at least finally paint the house. We will find the cause of our dissatisfaction and fix it.” Then, next thing we know, it’s another new year.

So how do we break free from this Sisyphean hamster wheel of broken New Year’s resolutions and take care of business? Books (obvs)! There are many useful books to help guide and inspire us on the path to self-improvement. It just so happens that I have written three manuscripts which fall under this category (totally crushed my resolutions for that year!): “Cooking, With Food,” “Find the Right Pilates Instructor for Your Blood Type” and “Being Fat Is Stupid, Stupid!” Unfortunately, I have yet to find a forward-thinking publisher who wants to purchase the rights to these books. Until then, here are some titles that have actually been published to help you achieve your goals for 2015, or at least keep the trials and tribulations of this annual ritual in perspective.

Stretch” by Neal Pollack
Based on Neal Pollack’s earlier satirical work it’s difficult to believe this man has a sincere dedication to the practice of yoga, but it’s true. Finding his career at a crossroads, and his body aging, he gives yoga a shot. He now writes a column for Yoga Journal and is a yoga instructor. The book is in a part a memoir of his experience as well as a look at the different corners of the yoga world. Don’t worry – despite the sincere devotion to his practice, he hasn’t lost his sense of humor or skeptical eye. This is an excellent introduction to yoga for people who think it “isn’t for them,” or are allergic to the earnestness often associated with it.

Book cover for Drop Dead Healthy by A.J. JacobsDrop Dead Healthy” by A.J. Jacobs
A.J. Jacobs has cut out a successful career as a writer of “stunt journalism.” He regularly immerses himself in a subject to see what it’s like, using himself as a guinea pig (in one case, literally). In this book he sets a two-year goal to become as a healthy as possible. The book’s combination of thorough research and humorous tone make it a great survey of various health fads. It’s nice of him to put himself through all this so we don’t have to.

The Road to Wellville” by T.C. Boyle
T.C. Boyle’s comic historical novel is set in Dr John Harvey Kellog’s (yes, the Corn Flakes guy) Battle Creek Spa. The book pokes fun at the strange “cures,” pseudo-science and hucksterism of the time. The scary part is when you start wondering how much resemblance there is to present-day health fads.

Book cover for Helping Me Help Myself by Beth LisickHelping Me Help Myself” by Beth Lisick
Beth Lisick wakes up on New Years Day to find she is tired of dealing with the same problems year after year. Despite her skepticism, she binges on the works of successful self-help gurus. In addition to reading their books she attends their seminars and starts to fear she might actually learn something from these “gurus.”

Promise Land” by Jessica Lamb Shapiro
Jessica Lamb Shapiro’s book takes on a similar challenge to the one in “Helping Me Help Myself,” but her skepticism has a more personal source because her father was an author of self-help books. The book is part memoir and part exploration of self-help culture. With an irreverent tone, she points out some of the snake-oil salesman in the field and attempts to determine if self-help culture really can be helpful.

Book cover for The Will to Whatevs by Eugene MirmanThe Will To Whatevs: A Guide to Modern Life” by Eugene Mirman
Eugene Mirman is a writer and stand-up comedian. He also is the voice of Gene Belcher on the television show “Bob’s Burgers.” With a resume like that, why wouldn’t you accept his advice on life and act accordingly? His book contains advice on family, school, romance, money (to be exact, “The Money Lover’s Guide to Making Money”) and my favorite, “The Theory and Practice of Organizations Connected With Government, I think.” I’m pretty sure you could just read this book and throw all the others I’m recommending in the trash. (Wait! Forget that last part. Treat library books with kindness!)

Paddle Your Own Canoe: One Man’s Principles for Delicious Living” by Nick Offerman
Nick Offerman is another comedian on another TV show (“Parks and Recreation” – watch it!). Messrs. Offerman and Mirman are making me me think the real answer to all our problems is to tell lots of jokes and get a TV show. Offerman’s character on “Parks and Rec” has taken on some of the traits of the man himself, most notably his appreciation of whiskey and his skills in the woodshop. Offerman’s book is part memoir, part manifesto for a life well lived, and all hilarious. It might even inspire you to dig your jigsaw out of that mess you call a workbench and start making something.

Book cover for How to Sharpen Pencils by David ReesHow To Sharpen Pencils” by David Rees
For some, learning a new craft or honing a skill is simply a hobby. For others, the act of mastering that craft is transformative. Can mastering the art of pencil sharpening be transformative? The last chapter of this book is titled, “How to sharpen a pencil with your mind.” We’re talking about some serious Jedi-level pencil sharpening here. I doubt you come out of that experience the same way you entered into it.

Simple Times” by Amy Sedaris
Not everyone’s New Year’s resolutions aspire to change their body, mind or entire way of life. Some people just want to get around to learning that craft they’ve never made the time for. Now is the time! Amy Sedaris has some excellent crafts to teach. Personally, I’m looking forward to watching squirrels get diabetes at the Donut Squirrel Feeder I’m going to construct. The perfect accompaniment to that scene will be the gentle clanging of the Rusty Nail Wind Chime I will also make. Very soon. Before 2015 is over. I swear.

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Registration Begins for C.A.R.E. Program

DBRLTeen - January 5, 2015
Young Adults Working at New York Deli

C.A.R.E. program participants working at New York Deli.  Photo courtesy of City of Columbia.

Each summer the City of Columbia sponsors the Career Awareness Related Experience (C.A.R.E.) program which prepares young adults for the workforce. The goals of this program are to provide paid, real-world experience while helping teens develop life skills and foster mentorships.

The C.A.R.E. program lasts eight weeks and they hire approximately 185 teens (14-19 years old) at minimum wage to work up to 20 hours per week. The online application must be submitted by Monday, February 2.  Interviews will begin the on February 13. For more details and a list of last year’s local summer work site partners, please visit the City of Columbia’s website.

Originally published at Registration Begins for C.A.R.E. Program.

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Let’s Travel: Budapest – a Journey Continues

DBRL Next - January 2, 2015

“The best way to learn about a new country is to experience its native food and culture,” Tünde, our tour director, said before we left the bus. “We have the opportunity to have a traditional Hungarian dinner and see a folk performance afterwards. It’s optional, or course, but I highly recommend it.”

IMG_3536The dinner, which started with a shot of hard liquor offered to us before we even crossed the threshold of the large, brightly lit restaurant, was, let’s say, interesting. Since I left Russia in 1990, I hadn’t seen so much alcohol splashing around. There was a lot of food, too: goulash (meat stew in a thick, paprika-infused sauce), a dish called galuska (dumplings), and – for dessert – another galuska, this time with raisins, nuts and ice-cream.

Then the concert began. It was exactly what I had envisioned – lots of jumping and loud singing with several fiddlers accompanying the action. But, with help of plenty of wine, everybody seemed to enjoy it. In fact, several tourists joined the folk dancers, while my husband kept raising his eyebrows and rolling his eyes. (What can you expect from a guy who doesn’t drink? It’s a miracle that he can have fun at all!)

Photo of the Hungarian ParliamentOur “official” introduction to Budapest started the next morning. A local tour guide told us that the name came about by joining the names of its twin cities: Buda, which is hilly and more historical, and Pest, flat and more commercial – with the Danube River dividing the two, and a series of bridges connecting them. We learned that the cultural fabric of the city had been woven by Hungarians, Slavs and Jews. We were shown the city’s major attractions: the Castle District, Heroes Square, the Hungarian Parliament, the Opera House and others. And, in the afternoon, we were left alone to shop and do other touristy things.

First, my husband and I had a lunch in an outdoor cafe, from where we enjoyed the view of St. Stephen’s Basilica and soaked up the atmosphere of the city. Then we continued our exploration. We walked for hours, passing by imposing buildings and statues, posters for upcoming concerts (it’s not for nothing that the Franz Liszt Museum is located in Budapest!), street vendors and restaurants, until our legs began to ache and the city began to grow on us.

Photo of the Széchenyi Chain BridgeIt was cloudy, but the temperature was pleasant. For a while, I moaned about the lack of blue sky, but soon I stopped complaining and began enjoying the city. Budapest rewarded me grandly. From the hilly grounds of the Castle and the Royal Palace on the Buda side, we admired views of the Danube and its bridges, the Pest skyline across the river and busily shuttling tour boats. On the Pest side, we happened onto a qualifying race for the 2015 Ironman World Championship. At the beautiful Chain Bridge, we witnessed the arrival of a Viking Cruise boat. Once again, we circled the Parliament building and, finally, headed back along the Danube Promenade.

As we walked, I noticed some brown shoes sitting on the river bank – several people were taking pictures of them. What was that about? But then I remembered the tour guide’s story.

Photo of The Shoes on the Danube BankThe shoes, 60 in all, were made of cast iron and set into the concrete of the embankment. They were a memorial to the people killed by the Hungarian Fascists in the winter of 1944-45. A vast majority of the victims were Jews, but there were some non-Jews, accused by the Fascists of “Jewish activities.” (The courageous efforts of the Swedish diplomat Raoul Wallenberg saved almost 100,000 people. Still, some 600,000 Hungarian Jews died during the war.)

The war was in its final stage, and the Fascists had no means of deporting people to Auschwitz. The easiest way to get rid of them was to shoot them by the Danube and let the river carry their bodies away. Before the Fascists murdered their victims they ordered them to take off their shoes, for the shoes could still be used or sold on the black market. Then people – men, women and children – were positioned on the edge of the embankment and shot, and their bodies fell into the river. Sometimes the militiamen tied several Jews together and then shot one of them, so that the dead body would pull the living into the river. If any of them survived the fall, the militiamen used them for target practice. This didn’t happen often, though. Most of the people – especially the children – died quickly in the freezing water.

I, too, took some photos, then we headed back to our hotel – quiet and suddenly tired. Oh, humanity – I thought to myself – how can you be so inhuman?

Luckily, that wasn’t my last memory of Budapest. At dusk, the ever energetic Tünde brought our group back to the river. We boarded a dinner boat, and while we ate, we listened to yet another tour guide and stared at the darkening city through the windows.

Photo of lighted buildings along the Danube RiverBy dessert, magic happened. All the prominent buildings along the Danube suddenly lit up, transforming the river into a vast, Christmas-like alley, and the city skyline into geometric formations of glimmering stars. It was drizzling, but nobody paid attention. Budapest stood out in the dark – golden, enchanted and unforgettable.

At 11 p.m., the lights were switched off, and night overtook the city once again. We boarded our bus and headed back to the hotel. Tomorrow we would travel to Salzburg.

The post Let’s Travel: Budapest – a Journey Continues appeared first on DBRL Next.

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Kill the Messenger

DBRL Next - December 31, 2014

Book cover for Dark Alliance by Gary WebbI saw a wonderful film not long ago called “Kill the Messenger.” That phrase is an old saw about taking out one’s displeasure on the one who brings bad news. This particular messenger was the San Jose Mercury reporter Gary Webb, and the message was his work tying the explosion of crack cocaine in the black neighborhoods of Los Angeles in the 1980s to important leaders of Ronald Reagan’s beloved Contras. The Contras were mercenaries who fought against the Sandinistas in Nicaragua and who (believe it or not!) were supported by drug sales in Los Angeles and other cities after Congress voted down funding for Reagan’s war in Central America. Turns out they were protected by the CIA and the mainstream press, as well as functionaries close to the White House.

The film was a thriller with a bit of pathos thrown in to demonstrate what happened to a reporter who embarrassed the US “deep state.” It can be found online (if you have a credit card), but in any case, DBRL has Webb’s book “Dark Alliance: The CIA, the Contras, and the Crack Cocaine Explosion,” as well as a few other interesting titles on the subject.

If you find it difficult to believe that the government prioritizes the “War on Drugs” and at the same time elements within the state are supporting the importation of those drugs, check out Douglas Valentine’s “The Strength of the Wolf,” which elucidates the many connections between the “deep state” and drug trafficking as discovered by the Federal Bureau of Narcotics prior to 1968 when the FBN was dissolved.

Book cover for Cocaine Politics by Jonathan MarshallWe also have Peter Dale Scott and Jonathan Marshall’s  “Cocaine Politics,” perhaps the first to document the drug trafficking of Nicaraguan counterrevolutionaries (the Contras) and the complicity of mercenaries and US government leaders and institutions. Here I bow to another reviewer, Marilynn Larew, who reviewed the book for the Atlanta Journal-Constitution (September 22, 1991, N9):

“Peter Dale Scott and Jonathan Marshall expand on revelations in the Iran-Contra scandal and the 1989 Kerry Committee Report. They assert persuasively that the CIA has long-standing alliances with men who deal drugs while doing dirty tricks for us in Latin America. The links go as far back as 1961 and the Bay of Pigs. Their story, however, is about the contra war, in which drug money paid for arms, the planes that carried ‘humanitarian aid’ in [and] flew drugs out, and Latin American colonels [who] made fortunes on drugs destined for American streets, all with our government’s connivance….The core of the book, the adventures of Jack Terrell…the soldier of fortune who tried to blow the whistle on the contra drug dealers, is taut as a thriller….The authors appear to evaluate the murky evidence in the government documents and news stories temperately. The thesis rings true.”

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Kill the Messenger

Next Book Buzz - December 31, 2014

Book cover for Dark Alliance by Gary WebbI saw a wonderful film not long ago called “Kill the Messenger.” That phrase is an old saw about taking out one’s displeasure on the one who brings bad news. This particular messenger was the San Jose Mercury reporter Gary Webb, and the message was his work tying the explosion of crack cocaine in the black neighborhoods of Los Angeles in the 1980s to important leaders of Ronald Reagan’s beloved Contras. The Contras were mercenaries who fought against the Sandinistas in Nicaragua and who (believe it or not!) were supported by drug sales in Los Angeles and other cities after Congress voted down funding for Reagan’s war in Central America. Turns out they were protected by the CIA and the mainstream press, as well as functionaries close to the White House.

The film was a thriller with a bit of pathos thrown in to demonstrate what happened to a reporter who embarrassed the US “deep state.” It can be found online (if you have a credit card), but in any case, DBRL has Webb’s book “Dark Alliance: The CIA, the Contras, and the Crack Cocaine Explosion,” as well as a few other interesting titles on the subject.

If you find it difficult to believe that the government prioritizes the “War on Drugs” and at the same time elements within the state are supporting the importation of those drugs, check out Douglas Valentine’s “The Strength of the Wolf,” which elucidates the many connections between the “deep state” and drug trafficking as discovered by the Federal Bureau of Narcotics prior to 1968 when the FBN was dissolved.

Book cover for Cocaine Politics by Jonathan MarshallWe also have Peter Dale Scott and Jonathan Marshall’s  “Cocaine Politics,” perhaps the first to document the drug trafficking of Nicaraguan counterrevolutionaries (the Contras) and the complicity of mercenaries and US government leaders and institutions. Here I bow to another reviewer, Marilynn Larew, who reviewed the book for the Atlanta Journal-Constitution (September 22, 1991, N9):

“Peter Dale Scott and Jonathan Marshall expand on revelations in the Iran-Contra scandal and the 1989 Kerry Committee Report. They assert persuasively that the CIA has long-standing alliances with men who deal drugs while doing dirty tricks for us in Latin America. The links go as far back as 1961 and the Bay of Pigs. Their story, however, is about the contra war, in which drug money paid for arms, the planes that carried ‘humanitarian aid’ in [and] flew drugs out, and Latin American colonels [who] made fortunes on drugs destined for American streets, all with our government’s connivance….The core of the book, the adventures of Jack Terrell…the soldier of fortune who tried to blow the whistle on the contra drug dealers, is taut as a thriller….The authors appear to evaluate the murky evidence in the government documents and news stories temperately. The thesis rings true.”

The post Kill the Messenger appeared first on DBRL Next.

Categories: Book Buzz

Audiobook Giveaway Winner Announced

DBRLTeen - December 31, 2014

Congratulations to Nila Palaniappan! She is the lucky winner of DBRLTeen’s “Will Grayson, Will Grayson” Book Giveaway. She will receive a free autographed copy of “Will Grayson, Will Grayson” on CD. If you’d like the chance to win more free books or a gift card to Barnes & Noble, be sure to support your favorite book in the upcoming March Madness Teen Book Tournament. Through a series of votes, we will narrow our list of the 32 most popular teen books to one grand champion. If you’d like to be informed of when voting begins, be sure to subscribe to our blog updates!

Originally published at Audiobook Giveaway Winner Announced.

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Suggested One Read: The Weight of Blood

One Read - December 30, 2014

Book cover for The Weight of Blood by Laura McHughIn January, our One Read reading panel will begin narrowing down the list of more than 100 books nominated for our community-wide reading program. In the meantime, we are highlighting just some of these suggested titles so you can see what other local readers are enjoying.

Each year at least one local author’s book is nominated, and this year is no different. “The Weight of Blood” by Laura McHugh received multiple nominations. This suspenseful tale, set in the Ozarks, focuses on seventeen-year-old Lucy Dane and her mother Lila, who disappeared not long after Lucy’s birth. The discovery of the body of a long-missing school friend compels Lucy to look into both disappearances, but few are willing to help her. One of our nominators writes, “The book is a well-written mystery and a page-turner. It deals with the closed culture in southern Missouri, family secrets and human trafficking.”

Read about some of the other books nominated for One Read 2015.

The post Suggested One Read: The Weight of Blood appeared first on One READ.

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Young Adult Books For Adults: Ashes by Ilsa J. Bick

DBRL Next - December 29, 2014

book cover for Ashes by Ilsa J. BickAlex believes she is going to die. The tumor growing in her brain, she expects it to be her end. When an electromagnetic pulse flashes across the sky, all of Alex’s expectations change. Suddenly, everyone in the age range of 20 to 60 is dead. Technology no longer works, and the world Alex knew no longer exists. Alex bands together with a little girl and a young soldier to survive, finding family and friends in them she never expected.

Obviously, by my description of “Ashes,” you can tell it’s apocalyptic fiction. I admit I’ve never been a big fan of apocalyptic fiction. For me, I find it a hard genre to read because reading about the world ending can be a pretty depressing topic. But Ilsa J. Bick is an amazing writer, and “Ashes” is easily in the top five best books I have read in the past two years.

It’s a fast read, and if you like the TV show “The Walking Dead,” I’m pretty sure you’ll love “Ashes” too. “Ashes” has the same feel as “The Walking Dead.” Odd characters come together, they fight together, create bonds, and then bad things happen. You’ll scream internally for the characters, root for them and cry for them, all because Bick creates them so beautifully. Before you know it, you’ll have finished the entire book in a few days.

Bick is an amazing writer, and although “Ashes” is considered YA, I would highly recommend it to the adult reader. Bick’s writing style is very honest. She’s got a unique take on action scenes, and I believe this is due to her background as an Air Force major. Her writing has a militaristic aspect, which happens to be perfect for apocalyptic fiction. Between this and her beautifully rendered characters, “Ashes” stands apart from the other reads in its genre.

Thankfully, “Ashes” is the first in a trilogy, and all three books are available. So, once you’ve finished “Ashes,” make sure to check out the second book, “Shadows,” and the third, “Monsters.”

The post Young Adult Books For Adults: Ashes by Ilsa J. Bick appeared first on DBRL Next.

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Young Adult Books For Adults: Ashes by Ilsa J. Bick

Next Book Buzz - December 29, 2014

book cover for Ashes by Ilsa J. BickAlex believes she is going to die. The tumor growing in her brain, she expects it to be her end. When an electromagnetic pulse flashes across the sky, all of Alex’s expectations change. Suddenly, everyone in the age range of 20 to 60 is dead. Technology no longer works, and the world Alex knew no longer exists. Alex bands together with a little girl and a young soldier to survive, finding family and friends in them she never expected.

Obviously, by my description of “Ashes,” you can tell it’s apocalyptic fiction. I admit I’ve never been a big fan of apocalyptic fiction. For me, I find it a hard genre to read because reading about the world ending can be a pretty depressing topic. But Ilsa J. Bick is an amazing writer, and “Ashes” is easily in the top five best books I have read in the past two years.

It’s a fast read, and if you like the TV show “The Walking Dead,” I’m pretty sure you’ll love “Ashes” too. “Ashes” has the same feel as “The Walking Dead.” Odd characters come together, they fight together, create bonds, and then bad things happen. You’ll scream internally for the characters, root for them and cry for them, all because Bick creates them so beautifully. Before you know it, you’ll have finished the entire book in a few days.

Bick is an amazing writer, and although “Ashes” is considered YA, I would highly recommend it to the adult reader. Bick’s writing style is very honest. She’s got a unique take on action scenes, and I believe this is due to her background as an Air Force major. Her writing has a militaristic aspect, which happens to be perfect for apocalyptic fiction. Between this and her beautifully rendered characters, “Ashes” stands apart from the other reads in its genre.

Thankfully, “Ashes” is the first in a trilogy, and all three books are available. So, once you’ve finished “Ashes,” make sure to check out the second book, “Shadows,” and the third, “Monsters.”

The post Young Adult Books For Adults: Ashes by Ilsa J. Bick appeared first on DBRL Next.

Categories: Book Buzz

2015 March Madness Booklist Announced

DBRLTeen - December 29, 2014

2015 March Madness Booklist

VOTE NOW through February 20 for the Sweet 16!

A new season of book rivalries has begun. Vote for our favorite titles from a pool of the 32 most popular teen books of the year. Your votes will narrow down the list to the 2015 Mid-Missouri teen book champion. For added excitement, each round you vote, your name will be entered into a drawing for a chance to win cool prizes like free book sets or a Barnes & Noble gift  card.

Vote at your library, or online at teens.dbrl.org, until February 20 for the Sweet 16; then four rounds of weekly voting will take place in March. We will announce the winner on April 7.

Who can participate?

March Madness is open to all teens ages 12-18 who live in either Boone or Callaway County, Missouri.

How It Works:

  • Round 1: VOTE NOW through February 20 for the Sweet 16.
  • Round 2: Vote March 4-11 for the Elite 8.
  • Round 3: Vote March 12-18 for the Final 4.
  • Round 4: Vote March 19-25 for the final two contending titles.
  • Round 5: Vote March 26-April 1 for the book tournament champion.
  • April 7: The champion is announced!

Each round that you vote, your name is entered into our prize drawing! Limit one ballot per person, per round.

March Madness Teen Book Tournament Finalists

Originally published at 2015 March Madness Booklist Announced.

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Reader Review: Joy Luck Club

DBRL Next - December 26, 2014

Editor’s note: This review was submitted by a library patron during the 2014 Adult Summer Reading program. We will continue to periodically share some of these reviews throughout the year.

joyluckclubThe Joy Luck Club” is a book about four Chinese immigrant families. It goes through the perspective of the mothers and daughters. The first story is about a character’s childhood, and the second story is about present times. The main character’s mother has just passed away, and she is about to embark on a journey to China to meet her mother’s twin girls from another marriage. I loved this book. It is so heartfelt and makes you want to go and hug your mother.

Four words that describe this book: mother, daughter, love, relationships

You might want to pick this book up if: You want a good cry.  The stories in this book are so amazing and touching you will surely cry your eyes out.  It is also an amazingly written book with so many life lessons.

-Anonymous

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While the Library Is Closed for the Holidays…

DBRL Next - December 24, 2014

Photo of a sign reading open 24 hoursDecember 24 and 25 our buildings are closed and the bookmobiles are parked in the garage, but the digital branch is always open. Visit dbrl.org and check out an eBook, research a purchase, watch a movie and more. Below are just a few of the ways you can use the library online this holiday or any day. All you need is Internet access and a library card.

photo credit: Tallent Show via photopin cc

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Suggested One Read: The Chaperone

One Read - December 23, 2014

Book cover for The Chaperone by Laura MoriartyWorks of fiction with real historical settings allow us to explore a past time and place in an intimate way. The nominator of “The Chaperone” by Laura Moriarty feels that the community would enjoy experiencing 1920s New York.

Our nominator writes, “[This is] a fictional story inspired by a real-life movie star Louise Brooks. This novel follows the life of the woman who chaperoned Brooks from Wichita, KS to New York City at the start of her film career. This book will appeal to the community because it is a fascinating story and written in a manner that pulls you in from the first page. The characters are truly drawn and easy to connect with; I did not want to put this book down when I was reading it. I think it will inspire lots of discussion – about the ’20s in the US, women’s role in the country during that time, old-time movies and much more.”

Read about other books nominated for One Read 2015.

The post Suggested One Read: The Chaperone appeared first on One READ.

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Top Ten Books Librarians Love: The January 2015 List

Next Book Buzz - December 22, 2014

Library Reads LogoIt’s cold and dark outside, so warm up with a recommended book from LibraryReads! The January list is full of thrills and mystery, just the thing to get your blood pumping. Here are the top 10 books librarians love that hit the shelves next month.

Book cover for As Chimney Sweepers Come to DustAs Chimney Sweepers Come to Dust” by Alan Bradley
“After the unexpected recovery of her mother’s body brings the de Luce’s family secrets to light, Flavia’s life is turned upside down. Now on her way to a Canadian boarding school, she must survive her first term – and more importantly, uncover the mystery of a corpse found in her dorm room chimney the night she arrives. A delightful installment in the series!” – Lizzie Gall, Grand Rapids Public Library, Grand Rapids, MI

Book cover for The Rosie Effect by Graeme SimsionThe Rosie Effect” by Graeme Simsion
“Don Tillman and Rosie are back again, and they’ve relocated to New York. Rosie is continuing her studies, while Don is teaching and even adding to his small circle of friends. But when Rosie announces that she is pregnant, Don is once again out of his depth. What follows are crazy situations that could only happen when Don is involved. Funny and heartwarming.” - Catherine Coyne, Mansfield Public Library, Mansfield, MA

Book cover for The Magician's LieThe Magician’s Lie” by Greer Macallister
“Arden is a famous illusionist whose show involves sawing a man in half, but one night, she grabs an axe instead of a knife and her husband is found dead under the stage. Can Arden, an expert at deception, get away with murder – or is she really innocent? Recommended to anyone who likes historical fiction, strong women characters and surprisingly twisty plots.” - Paula Jones, Brockton Public Library, Brockton, MA

Here’s the rest of the January list with links to these on-order titles in our catalog for your hold-placing pleasure. Enjoy!

The post Top Ten Books Librarians Love: The January 2015 List appeared first on DBRL Next.

Categories: Book Buzz

Top Ten Books Librarians Love: The January 2015 List

DBRL Next - December 22, 2014

Library Reads LogoIt’s cold and dark outside, so warm up with a recommended book from LibraryReads! The January list is full of thrills and mystery, just the thing to get your blood pumping. Here are the top 10 books librarians love that hit the shelves next month.

Book cover for As Chimney Sweepers Come to DustAs Chimney Sweepers Come to Dust” by Alan Bradley
“After the unexpected recovery of her mother’s body brings the de Luce’s family secrets to light, Flavia’s life is turned upside down. Now on her way to a Canadian boarding school, she must survive her first term – and more importantly, uncover the mystery of a corpse found in her dorm room chimney the night she arrives. A delightful installment in the series!” – Lizzie Gall, Grand Rapids Public Library, Grand Rapids, MI

Book cover for The Rosie Effect by Graeme SimsionThe Rosie Effect” by Graeme Simsion
“Don Tillman and Rosie are back again, and they’ve relocated to New York. Rosie is continuing her studies, while Don is teaching and even adding to his small circle of friends. But when Rosie announces that she is pregnant, Don is once again out of his depth. What follows are crazy situations that could only happen when Don is involved. Funny and heartwarming.” - Catherine Coyne, Mansfield Public Library, Mansfield, MA

Book cover for The Magician's LieThe Magician’s Lie” by Greer Macallister
“Arden is a famous illusionist whose show involves sawing a man in half, but one night, she grabs an axe instead of a knife and her husband is found dead under the stage. Can Arden, an expert at deception, get away with murder – or is she really innocent? Recommended to anyone who likes historical fiction, strong women characters and surprisingly twisty plots.” - Paula Jones, Brockton Public Library, Brockton, MA

Here’s the rest of the January list with links to these on-order titles in our catalog for your hold-placing pleasure. Enjoy!

The post Top Ten Books Librarians Love: The January 2015 List appeared first on DBRL Next.

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Program Preview: Family Game Days

DBRLTeen - December 22, 2014

ScrabbleFamily Game Day
Columbia Public Library
Tuesday, December 23 • 9:30-11:30 a.m. –OR– 2-3:30 p.m.
Drop by to play board games. We’ll have favorites, old and new, but feel free to bring your own games, too. For families with children of all ages.

Wii U Family Game Night
Columbia Public Library
Thursday, January 8 • 6-7:30 p.m.
Try out the library’s Wii U game console. Become a dancing superstar in “Just Dance 4″ or a bowling champion playing “Wii Sports.” Pizza served. Ages 10 and older. Parents welcome. Registration begins Tuesday, December 23. To sign-up, please call (573) 443-3161.

Photo by Flickr User peddhapati. Used under creative commons license.

Originally published at Program Preview: Family Game Days.

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Homemade Holiday Gifts: Hardback Charging Station

DBRLTeen - December 20, 2014

Kindle HolderAt my house, we have quite a few electronic devices: MP3 players, cell phones, digital cameras and e-readers. It’s a mess, and I can never find the right cord and charger when I need it.

That’s where the handy repurposed book comes in! It’s the perfect place to keep all of those devices out of sight, organized in a lovely, old-fashioned book that looks nice sitting next to your bed or on your bookshelf. You will find complete instructions to make your own at studenthacks.org.

When you are selecting your book to repurpose, make sure it is roomy enough to fit all the things you want to hide with a bit of space to spare for airflow and easy removal. In fact, you may want several books for several devices. Or, you can just find an enormous title that’s big enough for all of them while making you look like a serious reader. (“War and Peace,” anyone?)

These hidden charging stations make a great gift for anyone else you know who might need a bit of help corralling their stuff, too. Bonus: This project can also be modified to fit those ugly remote controls that always seem to make their way into the crack of the couch cushions.

If you enjoy crafting with recycled odd and ends, you should borrow the following titles from your library:

If you’re an online learner, check out our Hobbies & Crafts Reference Center. You can access this website for free with your library card number; your PIN is your birthdate (MMDDYYYY). You’ll find many fun project ideas available with instructions and inspiration for all sorts of interests.

Photo credit: Kindle Case Mosaic by litlnemo via Flickr. Used under creative commons license.

Originally published at Homemade Holiday Gifts: Hardback Charging Station.

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A Few Thrilling Recommendations

Next Book Buzz - December 19, 2014

For me, the mark of an especially good book is how firmly it grabs hold of me. It’s always a pleasure to stumble across a novel that captures my attention so tightly that it has me longing to get back to it during those moments I have to pause in my reading. Here are a few of my favorite thrilling finds from 2014 that I think other readers will also be captivated by:

 

  • Book cover for Blood Work by Michael ConnellyBlood Work” by Michael Connelly. Readers may be familiar with Connelly’s two series featuring detective Harry Bosch and his half-brother, lawyer Mickey Haller. “Blood Work,” a novel set in the same “universe” as the books about Bosch and Haller, follows former FBI agent and recent heart recipient, Terry McCaleb. Upon learning that his heart donor may have been murdered, McCaleb becomes deeply troubled that his own life was saved at the cost of someone else’s. Despite doctor’s orders not to, he sets out to discover just what happened to his donor and soon finds himself in the web of an insidious killer. I could not put down this book and was unprepared for the story’s twist-filled conclusion.
  • Book cover for Trouble in Mind by Jeffery DeaverTrouble in Mind” by Jeffery Deaver. I am a big fan of Deaver’s Lincoln Rhymes books, which follow a quadriplegic former NYPD detective who uses logic and science to find the solution to mind-boggling puzzles. This collection of short stories proves that Deaver can venture outside of the world of Rhymes and still produce a whopper of a tale. I enjoyed each of these short stories, but a few stood out for me. Rhymes makes two appearances in the book, including one that begins with the disturbing revelation that he has passed away – or has he? In another tale, a man returns to his hometown where he learns his long dead father was not what he seemed. The book concludes with a fantastic novella that follows a crime statistician who believes a series of deaths are not as random as they appear. Even readers who do not normally read short stories should consider this exciting collection of thrillers.
  • Book cover for People of the Book by Geraldine BrooksPeople of the Book” by Geraldine Brooks. This is probably my favorite read of the past year. Brooks’ fabulous novel begins with scholars examining the bits of materials found in between the pages of an illustrated Jewish manuscript called the Haggadah, in the hopes of determining the book’s history. Chapter by chapter the story unfolds in reverse,  introducing the book’s previous owners and through this, revealing how the materials found their way into the book’s pages over the centuries. Although not a traditional mystery, this story unwinds in a way that will keep readers guessing as to the exact journey the Haggadah took through the centuries. I know readers will be as enthralled as I was by Brooks’ moving novel.

The post A Few Thrilling Recommendations appeared first on DBRL Next.

Categories: Book Buzz

A Few Thrilling Recommendations

DBRL Next - December 19, 2014

For me, the mark of an especially good book is how firmly it grabs hold of me. It’s always a pleasure to stumble across a novel that captures my attention so tightly that it has me longing to get back to it during those moments I have to pause in my reading. Here are a few of my favorite thrilling finds from 2014 that I think other readers will also be captivated by:

 

  • Book cover for Blood Work by Michael ConnellyBlood Work” by Michael Connelly. Readers may be familiar with Connelly’s two series featuring detective Harry Bosch and his half-brother, lawyer Mickey Haller. “Blood Work,” a novel set in the same “universe” as the books about Bosch and Haller, follows former FBI agent and recent heart recipient, Terry McCaleb. Upon learning that his heart donor may have been murdered, McCaleb becomes deeply troubled that his own life was saved at the cost of someone else’s. Despite doctor’s orders not to, he sets out to discover just what happened to his donor and soon finds himself in the web of an insidious killer. I could not put down this book and was unprepared for the story’s twist-filled conclusion.
  • Book cover for Trouble in Mind by Jeffery DeaverTrouble in Mind” by Jeffery Deaver. I am a big fan of Deaver’s Lincoln Rhymes books, which follow a quadriplegic former NYPD detective who uses logic and science to find the solution to mind-boggling puzzles. This collection of short stories proves that Deaver can venture outside of the world of Rhymes and still produce a whopper of a tale. I enjoyed each of these short stories, but a few stood out for me. Rhymes makes two appearances in the book, including one that begins with the disturbing revelation that he has passed away – or has he? In another tale, a man returns to his hometown where he learns his long dead father was not what he seemed. The book concludes with a fantastic novella that follows a crime statistician who believes a series of deaths are not as random as they appear. Even readers who do not normally read short stories should consider this exciting collection of thrillers.
  • Book cover for People of the Book by Geraldine BrooksPeople of the Book” by Geraldine Brooks. This is probably my favorite read of the past year. Brooks’ fabulous novel begins with scholars examining the bits of materials found in between the pages of an illustrated Jewish manuscript called the Haggadah, in the hopes of determining the book’s history. Chapter by chapter the story unfolds in reverse,  introducing the book’s previous owners and through this, revealing how the materials found their way into the book’s pages over the centuries. Although not a traditional mystery, this story unwinds in a way that will keep readers guessing as to the exact journey the Haggadah took through the centuries. I know readers will be as enthralled as I was by Brooks’ moving novel.

The post A Few Thrilling Recommendations appeared first on DBRL Next.

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Suggested One Read: Station Eleven

One Read - December 18, 2014

Book cover for Station Eleven by Emily St. John MandelNominations for the 2015 One Read program are now closed, and we are highlighting just some of the titles area readers think the community should read together. Next up is “Station Eleven” by Emily St. John Mandel.

This novel opens with a famous Hollywood actor dying onstage during a production of King Lear. Hours later, the world as we know it begins to dissolve as a fast-acting and deadly strain of the flu spreads around the world. Our nominator writes, “This is very different take on a well-worn narrative – post-apocalyptic fiction. The topic is timely (pandemic – echoes of Ebola), and the book is beautifully written. It’s about the importance of love and art, the social contract, and what matters when the world we know falls away.”

Check out what others in your community are reading and enjoying!

The post Suggested One Read: Station Eleven appeared first on One READ.

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