Feed aggregator

Getting to Know Agatha Christie

Next Book Buzz - September 12, 2016

 An AutobiographyIf you’re looking for a cozy mystery, you can’t go wrong with any one of Agatha Christie’s books. As the uncontested “queen of the mystery,” Christie helped define a genre with her legendary characters, Hercule Poirot and Jane Marple. Christie was not afraid to let the dark sides of society show through in the stories she wrote. Readers may find themselves wondering how a seemingly mild-mannered lady came up with these stories, and there are several books at the library that can give insight into the life that inspired these classic mysteries. Here are a few I recommend.

  • Christie’s natural storytelling abilities shine brightly in the telling of her own story in “An Autobiography.” Initially published shortly after her death, the book chronicles Christie’s life, from a rather idyllic childhood, spent mostly in the countryside of Devonshire, to the archaeological trips that took her around the world. Readers will enjoy getting to know the personal side of Christie and her perspective on a life lived out during the turbulent years of the early 1900s.

  •  Around the World With the Queen of MysteryAlthough many of Christie’s novels are set in England, her characters do venture out to other parts of the world. These exotic settings were likely inspired by Christie’s own travels, particularly the world tour that she took in 1922 with her first husband, Archibald. “The Grand Tour: Around the World with the Queen of Mystery” gathers the correspondence between Christie and her mother over the 10 months she was away. Colored with vivid descriptions of both the countries she visited and the people who inhabited them, this is a delightful look into an adventure that shaped the great mystery writer.
  •  The Real Life of Agatha ChristieReaders wanting a more whimsical read should check out Anne Martinetti and Guillaume Lebeau’s “Agatha: The Real Life of Agatha Christie.” This graphic novel appears quite simple at a glance, but it offers a colorful look into Christie’s life. Fans of her books may enjoy it especially because Poirot and Miss Marple pop up throughout the book, offering insight into the woman who created them.
  • Christie herself starred in what may have been her greatest mystery. In 1926 she disappeared from her home for 11 days. Search parties were gathered, and even some of the other mystery greats of the day — Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and Dorothy L. Sayers — pondered what may have happened. Christie eventually turned up at a hotel spa, seemingly with no memory of the time she was missing. She would not speak about the event, so all that exists of what happened is speculation. Author Jared Cade explores the events of those 11 days and offers his own theory regarding her missing time in “Agatha Christie and the Eleven Missing Days.”

Happy reading!

The post Getting to Know Agatha Christie appeared first on DBRL Next.

Categories: Book Buzz

Getting to Know Agatha Christie

DBRL Next - September 12, 2016

 An AutobiographyIf you’re looking for a cozy mystery, you can’t go wrong with any one of Agatha Christie’s books. As the uncontested “queen of the mystery,” Christie helped define a genre with her legendary characters, Hercule Poirot and Jane Marple. Christie was not afraid to let the dark sides of society show through in the stories she wrote. Readers may find themselves wondering how a seemingly mild-mannered lady came up with these stories, and there are several books at the library that can give insight into the life that inspired these classic mysteries. Here are a few I recommend.

  • Christie’s natural storytelling abilities shine brightly in the telling of her own story in “An Autobiography.” Initially published shortly after her death, the book chronicles Christie’s life, from a rather idyllic childhood, spent mostly in the countryside of Devonshire, to the archaeological trips that took her around the world. Readers will enjoy getting to know the personal side of Christie and her perspective on a life lived out during the turbulent years of the early 1900s.

  •  Around the World With the Queen of MysteryAlthough many of Christie’s novels are set in England, her characters do venture out to other parts of the world. These exotic settings were likely inspired by Christie’s own travels, particularly the world tour that she took in 1922 with her first husband, Archibald. “The Grand Tour: Around the World with the Queen of Mystery” gathers the correspondence between Christie and her mother over the 10 months she was away. Colored with vivid descriptions of both the countries she visited and the people who inhabited them, this is a delightful look into an adventure that shaped the great mystery writer.
  •  The Real Life of Agatha ChristieReaders wanting a more whimsical read should check out Anne Martinetti and Guillaume Lebeau’s “Agatha: The Real Life of Agatha Christie.” This graphic novel appears quite simple at a glance, but it offers a colorful look into Christie’s life. Fans of her books may enjoy it especially because Poirot and Miss Marple pop up throughout the book, offering insight into the woman who created them.
  • Christie herself starred in what may have been her greatest mystery. In 1926 she disappeared from her home for 11 days. Search parties were gathered, and even some of the other mystery greats of the day — Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and Dorothy L. Sayers — pondered what may have happened. Christie eventually turned up at a hotel spa, seemingly with no memory of the time she was missing. She would not speak about the event, so all that exists of what happened is speculation. Author Jared Cade explores the events of those 11 days and offers his own theory regarding her missing time in “Agatha Christie and the Eleven Missing Days.”

Happy reading!

The post Getting to Know Agatha Christie appeared first on DBRL Next.

Categories: More From DBRL...

National Day of Service and Remembrance

DBRL Next - September 9, 2016

Book cover for VolunteerStarting in 2002, 9/11 family members and support groups wanted to provide a productive and respectful way to honor the memory of those who were lost, as well as recreate the spirit of unity and coming together to do good works that this tragedy inspired. As a result of their efforts, the September 11th National Day of Service and Remembrance was established into law by the Edward M. Kennedy Serve America Act in 2009.

There are no shortage of worthy causes needing our time and attention. The library’s volunteering subject guide links to many local organizations that could use a helping hand, whether your passion is arts education, literacy, fighting hunger or helping animals. And if you are in the Columbia area, the Columbia Daily Tribune’s “get involved” section lists current opportunities at organizations actively seeking volunteer help.

The library has many books on ideas for volunteering as a family, combining your passion for travel and volunteerism and much more. We hope you’ll be inspired to contribute positively to your community, this day and beyond.

The post National Day of Service and Remembrance appeared first on DBRL Next.

Categories: More From DBRL...

Winners Announced in Teen Photo Contest

DBRLTeen - September 9, 2016

Today we recognize the winners in our  Teen Photography Contest. Area young adults were asked to capture life in motion in keeping with DBRL’s summer reading theme, “Ready, Set, Read!” The library received 25 entries.

  • First Place: “Free to Run” by Kimberly Lybrand
  • Second Place: “Dig Deep” by Ellie Reynolds
  • Third Place: “Fun in the Mud” by Krystal Ridgeway
  • People’s Choice Award: “Letting Go” by Meghan Thomas

[See image gallery at teens.dbrl.org]

Each of our winners will receive a gift card to Barnes & Noble. A complete online album of all the amazing contest entries is below.

In one month, the library will launch another fun photo contest. Celebrate Teen Read Week by “bookfacing” your favorite book. Replace your face with the book’s cover, creating the illusion that you and the jacket art are one. Snap a photo and then submit it to the library via email. Winners will receive a Barnes & Noble gift card. Entries are due December 2. Ages 12-18. Contest rules and submission guidelines will be available beginning October 9 at teens.dbrl.org.

[See image gallery at teens.dbrl.org]

Originally published at Winners Announced in Teen Photo Contest.

Categories: More From DBRL...

Star Trek, Boldly Going for 50 Years

DBRL Next - September 7, 2016

 The Official Guide to our UniverseI have a great story about this blog post. The same day I started work on it, I began de-cluttering at home, organizing the piles of books my family tends to amass. As I picked up an old paperback Star Trek novel, bought used, a newspaper clipping fell out. The headline read “Roddenberry Fills Heroic Void.” The article discussed a talk given in Jesse Auditorium by Gene Roddenberry, creator of the Star Trek television series. I could find no mention of the date or even the name of the newspaper, but with a bit of sleuthing through the library’s collection of University of Missouri yearbooks, I confirmed the event happened on February 17, 1976.

Among quotes from the talk, this one stood out: “Roddenberry predicted giant and efficient telecommunications systems will be available within 12 years that will make TV look primitive.” He was off by only three years, as the World Wide Web went public in 1991. Quite a visionary. His mid-sixties TV series featured communications devices that looked a lot like cell phones, information storage devices that looked a lot like iPads and a starship crew that looked a lot like the entire human race had learned to work together cooperatively.

When “Star Trek” debuted in 1966 (September 6 in Canada and September 8 in the U.S.), the sight of a multi-ethnic, mixed-gender group of people working together as equals represented a giant leap forward in popular entertainment and society. Decades later, the population of devoted Trekkies continues to grow.

Just in time for the show’s 50th anniversary, DBRL has acquired DVD sets of nearly every “Star Trek” series, including the animated one, to fulfill your binge-watching needs. We also have a large selection of Star Trek novels, music CDs of the movie soundtracks and, for those who use Hoopla, Star Trek comics.

A handful of nonfiction books about the Trek universe have been published in the last couple of years:

Star Trek, the Official Guide to Our Universe” explores “the true science behind the starship voyages.” Author Andrew Fazekas, an astronomy educator, provides fascinating facts about the celestial phenomena encountered on the screen.

The Star Trek Book” by Paul Ruditis provides generously illustrated short, encyclopedia-type entries describing characters, planets, technology and alien races encountered in the series.

In “The Fifty Year Mission” Edward Gross and Mark Altman have compiled two volumes worth of quotes from people involved in Star Trek on all aspects of the enterprise. (See what I did there?) The result is a historical overview of the entire franchise from a variety of perspectives.

With the new series “Star Trek: Discovery” set to launch in 2017, we’re not to the end yet. When asked about the enduring appeal of his creation, Roddenberry once said, “The human race is a remarkable creature, one with great potential, and I hope that ‘Star Trek’ has helped to show us what we can be if we believe in ourselves and our abilities.”

The post Star Trek, Boldly Going for 50 Years appeared first on DBRL Next.

Categories: More From DBRL...

Circuit Science: Teen

DBRLTeen - September 6, 2016

Snap CircuitCircuit Science: Teen
Columbia Public Library, Studio
Monday, September 19, 5:30-6:30 p.m.

“Snap Circuits” make learning about electronics easy and fun. Build simple machines or more complex projects like a remote controlled Snap Rover. Ages 12-18.  Ages 12-18. Registration required. To sign up, please call (573)443-3161.

Originally published at Circuit Science: Teen.

Categories: More From DBRL...

September Is Library Card Sign-up Month!

DBRL Next - September 2, 2016

Sally Comic

Truer words have never been spoken (and don’t worry, I’m not biased). I got my own library card in the first grade. I signed it (with my beginner’s cursive), looked at it lovingly and promptly handed it to my dad for safe-keeping in his wallet. Sure, I had been a regular fixture in my local library since I was too young to remember, but the books I took home were always checked out to my mom or dad. That all changed once I got my own library card. It would take a few years for me to fully appreciate what my library card could do for me, though. September is Library Card Sign-Up Month, and it’s also a time to consider what brings you “library happiness.”

The Daniel Boone Regional Library has a lot to offer our library card holders! Besides getting the latest bestsellers in traditional and digital formats, library card holders have access to our online resources for free. These include lynda.com, which has self-paced tutorials on a variety of technical skills and business strategies, genealogy sites such as HeritageQuest and even auto repair resources. We also have some fun eBooks for kids through EZTales.com, Fable Learning and TumbleBookLibrary. All you need is your library card to access all of these resources!

“But what if I don’t have a library card,” you ask? Well, lucky for you, we can help with that. Adults (18+) can apply for a card online, and we can also get you set up with a card by mail or in-person. For specifics on card eligibility, look here. I should take a moment to note that there is no minimum age requirement for a library card. Minors do need parent or guardian signatures on their applications, but they can get a library card from the day they are born. (We like to start ’em young!)

If you are reading this, however, the chances are good you already have a DBRL library card. Maybe you’re a super user of the library, or perhaps you’re more casual. Either way, I ask you to share what you love about the library. Comment using the speech bubble prompt below, or use the hastag #LibraryHappinessIs, to tell us how the library brings you happiness!

library happiness is bubble

Peanuts comic: copyright Charles Schulz, licensed by the American Library Association

The post September Is Library Card Sign-up Month! appeared first on DBRL Next.

Categories: More From DBRL...

KFRU’s David Lile Interviews One Read Author George Hodgman

One Read - September 1, 2016

On August 31st, KFRU’s David Lile interviewed this year’s One Read author George Hodgman about his memoir, “Bettyville.” Listen to Hodgman speak on the writing process, his struggle with maintaining some privacy of his mother, and the possibility of adapting “Bettyville” into a TV show.

The post KFRU’s David Lile Interviews One Read Author George Hodgman appeared first on One Read.

Categories: More From DBRL...

Top Ten Books Librarians Love: The September 2016 List

DBRL Next - August 31, 2016

The kids are back at school, and maybe that has some readers feeling overwhelmed by the orientations, sports practices, rehearsals and other related events suddenly filling up the family calendar. Or perhaps the back-to-school spirit has you ready to learn something new. Whether you want to read for escape or for self-improvement, this month’s LibraryReads list has you covered. Here are the 10 titles publishing in September that librarians across the country recommend.

Book cover for Leave Me by Gayle FormanLeave Me” by Gayle Forman

“Aren’t there days when you just want to leave it all behind? After a life threatening event, that’s exactly what Maribeth Klein does. Maribeth, wife, mom of 4-year old twins, and editor of a glossy magazine is told to rest. Sure! The choice she makes is not the one for most, but following Maribeth on this journey is compelling nonetheless. Fast paced narrative and terrific writing make this one hard to put down. Recommended!” – Carol Ann Tack, Merrick Library, Merrick, NY

The Bookshop on the Corner” by Jenny Colgan

“Despite losing her job as a librarian who liked to put the right book into a patron’s hands, Nina continues her mission by moving to rural Scotland, purchasing a van, converting it into a bookmobile, and taking to the road. The plot revolves around the romance of the road, the romance of books and reading, and just plain old romance. Another marvelous book by Colgan! A gem of a book!” – Virginia Holsten, Vinton Public Library, Vinton, IA

Book cover for Commonwealth by Ann PatchettCommonwealth” by Ann Patchett

“The Cousins and the Keatings are two California families forever intertwined and permanently shattered by infidelity. Bert Cousins leaves his wife for Beverly Keating, leaving her to raise four children on her own. Beverly, with two children of her own, leaves her husband for Bert. The six children involved are forced to forge a childhood bond based on the combined disappointment in their parents. As adults, they find their families’ stories revealed in a way they couldn’t possibly expect. Patchett has written a family drama that perfectly captures both the absurdity and the heartbreak of domestic life.” – Michael Colford, Boston Public Library, Boston, MA

Here’s the rest of the best for your holds-placing pleasure!

The post Top Ten Books Librarians Love: The September 2016 List appeared first on DBRL Next.

Categories: More From DBRL...

Top Ten Books Librarians Love: The September 2016 List

Next Book Buzz - August 31, 2016

The kids are back at school, and maybe that has some readers feeling overwhelmed by the orientations, sports practices, rehearsals and other related events suddenly filling up the family calendar. Or perhaps the back-to-school spirit has you ready to learn something new. Whether you want to read for escape or for self-improvement, this month’s LibraryReads list has you covered. Here are the 10 titles publishing in September that librarians across the country recommend.

Book cover for Leave Me by Gayle FormanLeave Me” by Gayle Forman

“Aren’t there days when you just want to leave it all behind? After a life threatening event, that’s exactly what Maribeth Klein does. Maribeth, wife, mom of 4-year old twins, and editor of a glossy magazine is told to rest. Sure! The choice she makes is not the one for most, but following Maribeth on this journey is compelling nonetheless. Fast paced narrative and terrific writing make this one hard to put down. Recommended!” – Carol Ann Tack, Merrick Library, Merrick, NY

The Bookshop on the Corner” by Jenny Colgan

“Despite losing her job as a librarian who liked to put the right book into a patron’s hands, Nina continues her mission by moving to rural Scotland, purchasing a van, converting it into a bookmobile, and taking to the road. The plot revolves around the romance of the road, the romance of books and reading, and just plain old romance. Another marvelous book by Colgan! A gem of a book!” – Virginia Holsten, Vinton Public Library, Vinton, IA

Book cover for Commonwealth by Ann PatchettCommonwealth” by Ann Patchett

“The Cousins and the Keatings are two California families forever intertwined and permanently shattered by infidelity. Bert Cousins leaves his wife for Beverly Keating, leaving her to raise four children on her own. Beverly, with two children of her own, leaves her husband for Bert. The six children involved are forced to forge a childhood bond based on the combined disappointment in their parents. As adults, they find their families’ stories revealed in a way they couldn’t possibly expect. Patchett has written a family drama that perfectly captures both the absurdity and the heartbreak of domestic life.” – Michael Colford, Boston Public Library, Boston, MA

Here’s the rest of the best for your holds-placing pleasure!

The post Top Ten Books Librarians Love: The September 2016 List appeared first on DBRL Next.

Categories: Book Buzz

Be Part of National History Day

DBRLTeen - August 30, 2016

History Day WidgetPut Your Stamp on History. Be Part of National History Day.
Columbia Public Library
Thursday, September 15 • 6:30-8 p.m.

Each year, more than half a million students, encouraged by thousands of teachers nationwide, participate in the National History Day contest. Learn how you can uncover history and produce a documentary, exhibit, paper, performance or website to enter into this competition. Your project may even take you to the University of Missouri or to Washington D.C.! This program will be facilitated by NHDMO coordinators Shelly Croteau and Maggie Mayhan. It is recommended for ages 10 and older.

Even if you can’t make this special program, don’t forget that DBRL has dozens of print resources available with primary sources like amendments, petitions and speeches. As you begin your project, we encourage you to visit any of our three branch locations for assistance with your in-depth research.

The library also has a collection of free online databases that will give you access to hundreds of additional primary resources including newspaper articles. To access these online databases, you will need to login using your DBRL library card number. Your PIN is your birthdate (MMDDYYYY).

If you have questions or encounter difficulties logging in, please call (573) 443-3161 or (800) 324-4806. You can also try the library’s chat reference service to visit with a librarian who can help in real time from your computer. Learn more.

Originally published at Be Part of National History Day.

Categories: More From DBRL...

Fall Program Preview: One Read and More

DBRL Next - August 29, 2016

one-read-logo-newSeptember is almost here! The kids are back in school, and those vacations to the mountains or the lake (or just the hammock in the back yard) are now memories and fodder for the “what I did this summer” English class essays. Your calendars are likely filling up with fall events, and so are ours! At the library, September is One Read month, with four weeks of programs around a single book the community helps select. This year’s book is the memoir “Bettyville” by George Hodgman. You can see the full line-up of discussions, films, art events and more online. And here are other great programs for adults happening soon.

Danny SantosDanny Santos Concert
Wednesday, September 7, 2016 › 7-8 p.m.
Columbia Public Library, Friends Room
Taking inspiration from his Chicano heritage, a musical legacy ranging from Hank Williams to the Beatles and his Texas-sized determination, singer-songwriter Danny Santos creates a unique mix of country and folk tinged with bluegrass and the blues. His songs illuminate the joys of true love, the woe of love lost and the weary longing of a heart still searching, and his style is heavily influenced by the likes of Townes Van Zandt, Guy Clark and other Texas singer-songwriters. When he’s not appearing solo, he also fronts the acoustic band Los Bluegrass Vatos. Adults and teens.

Affordable Care Act News & Updates
Thursday, September 8, 2016 › 6-7:30 p.m.
Callaway County Public Library, Friends Room, Or
Thursday, September 15, 2016 › 5-7 p.m.
Southern Boone County Public Library
Primaris Foundation, a nonprofit organization based in Columbia, will help you better understand what your ACA health insurance options are, where you can go to get free help with using the online system or the call center, how the Health Insurance Marketplace works with other health insurance, and where else to get free and confidential help with your coverage needs.

Genealogy Drop-in
Monday, September 12, 2016 › 9:30 a.m.-Noon
Columbia Public Library, Training Center
Drop in to ask questions about researching your family history.

Game Time for Grown-ups
Monday, September 12, 2016 › 12:30-2 p.m.
Southern Boone County Public Library
Bring your friends and join us for Wii bowling, coloring and board games. Adults.

Will They Count Your Vote?
Sunday, September 18, 2016 › 2-3:30 p.m.
Columbia Public Library, Friends Room
In honor of National Constitution Day, come learn about the Voting Rights Act, the impact of the 2013 Supreme Court Decision on the Act, and subsequent state-level efforts affecting voting rights around the nation. Copies of the U.S. Constitution will be available for for the first 50 attendees. Refreshments will be provided. Co-sponsored by the League of Women Voters of Columbia-Boone County and the American Association of University Women-Columbia Branch.

Mizzou Botanic Garden Author Reception
Monday, September 19 › 7-8:30 p.m.
Columbia Public Library, Friends Room
Come meet nationally known author LaManda Joy, the founder of Chicago’s Peterson Garden Project, and hear her speak about the process of starting and maintaining a community garden. Copies of her book “Start a Community Food Garden” will be available for purchase and signing. Co-sponsored by the Mizzou Botanic Garden.

See all of our upcoming programs at dbrl.org.

The post Fall Program Preview: One Read and More appeared first on DBRL Next.

Categories: More From DBRL...

Reader Review: Red Rising

DBRL Next - August 26, 2016

Editor’s note: This review was submitted by a library patron during the 2016 Adult Summer Reading program. We will continue to periodically share some of these reviews throughout the year.

red risingIn his debut novel (and the first in the Red Rising trilogy), Pierce Brown introduces a dystopian story that should appeal to readers who enjoyed the Hunger Games trilogy. Teenaged Darrow lives in an under-earth colony on Mars that toils to make the surface livable for future inhabitants. Oppressive rule is all he’s known, but a dramatic turn of events soon forces Darrow to fight for a better life for his community. If that sounds a bit cliche, I suppose it’s because I didn’t find much new to keep my interest in this story. Other than the setting and the sex of the main character, it feels very much like “Hunger Games: Catching Fire.” Whereas that was the second book in a trilogy (with the benefit of the slow-build to revolutionary action and character development from the first book), this book seems to move the reader quickly down Darrow’s (stealth) revolutionary path. I found it difficult to feel empathy for the main character’s motivations without experiencing more of his world before he took steps toward revolution. I think I’m in the minority in not caring for this book, though, so if you like dystopian novels, give it a try!

Three words that describe this book: dystopian, quick-read, Hunger-Games-like

You might want to pick this book up if: You enjoy dystopian novels with teenage protagonists, especially if you are a fan of the Hunger Games novels.

-Katie

The post Reader Review: Red Rising appeared first on DBRL Next.

Categories: More From DBRL...

Against the Grain: Docs About Outlaws

DBRL Next - August 24, 2016

wild and wonderful whites of west virginia 1

The rules of society are sometimes flaunted by criminals. Who are these people, and what makes them tick? Check out these documentaries that feature various outlaws.

wile and wonderful whites of west virginiaThe Wild and Wonderful Whites of West Virginia” (2010)

A shocking and outlandish year-in-the-life documentary about the White Family of Boone County, West Virginia’s most notorious extended family. The film includes shoot-outs, robberies, gas-huffing, drug dealing and using, pill popping, murders and tap dancing.

smash and grabSmash and Grab” (2013)

This film is an exclusive all-access pass into the mysterious world of international jewel thieves.  Dubbed ‘The Pink Panthers,’ the formidable Balkan gang has stolen nearly a billion dollars worth of jewels from boutiques in the world’s most opulent cities.

if a tree fallsIf a Tree Falls: A Story of the Earth Liberation Front” (2011)

The remarkable story of the rise and fall of the Earth Liberation Front, a radical environmental group that the FBI calls America’s ‘number one domestic terrorist threat, ‘ told through the transformation and radicalization of one of its members, Daniel McGowan.

The post Against the Grain: Docs About Outlaws appeared first on DBRL Next.

Categories: More From DBRL...

ACT/SAT Test Prep Resources @ Your Library

DBRLTeen - August 23, 2016

Do you have questions about the ACT OR SAT exam? Well, DBRLTeen has answers.  We have compiled a list of resources to help you prepare for these college entrance exams.

  • How much does the ACT OR SAT exam cost?
  • Where are the testing centers in Boone and Callaway counties?
  • What are the deadlines to register for the ACT OR SAT exam?
  • Most importantly, how can I prepare for these tests?

Learn more by reviewing our online guide to ACT/SAT preparation. Young adults are also encouraged to borrow one of our many printed ACT or SAT test guides, or take free online practice exams through LearningExpress Library.  And, don’t forget to subscribe to our blog updates for regular reminders of upcoming test registration deadlines!

Originally published at ACT/SAT Test Prep Resources @ Your Library.

Categories: More From DBRL...

Staff Review: The Grownup

Next Book Buzz - August 22, 2016

Grownup bookc coverAs a young adult, I sometimes feel like a fraud — a kid just playing pretend at being a grownup. I think most people have feelings like this occasionally, but the unnamed narrator in Gillian Flynn’s latest is a fraud and has made a living at it her entire life. Growing up poor, she and her mother would beg on the streets, and they had an intricate system: they knew who to ask, how to ask, when to embellish and which specific embellishment to use on a particular mark.

As “The Grownup” opens, the narrator makes ends meet by a rather unsavory profession, which she simply calls working in “customer service.” When she gets the chance to work as (read: pretend to be) a psychic, she jumps on it, knowing that her ability to manipulate people would make for easy money. She takes on Susan as a client, a housewife with a rocky relationship with her seemingly evil stepson and a house that appears haunted. Is the narrator finally in over her head? One thing is certain: something malicious exists, but where it originates and what can be done to stop it will keep you guessing.

This book, clocking in at 64 pages, is an incredibly short yet satisfying read. It was originally published as part of a collection of short stories — “Rogues,” edited by George R.R. Martin and Gardner Dozois. Flynn acknowledges Martin at the end of the book, thanking him for asking her to write him a story, but this reader would like to thank Flynn for providing us with this intriguing little tale.

The post Staff Review: The Grownup appeared first on DBRL Next.

Categories: Book Buzz

Staff Review: The Grownup

DBRL Next - August 22, 2016

Grownup bookc coverAs a young adult, I sometimes feel like a fraud — a kid just playing pretend at being a grownup. I think most people have feelings like this occasionally, but the unnamed narrator in Gillian Flynn’s latest is a fraud and has made a living at it her entire life. Growing up poor, she and her mother would beg on the streets, and they had an intricate system: they knew who to ask, how to ask, when to embellish and which specific embellishment to use on a particular mark.

As “The Grownup” opens, the narrator makes ends meet by a rather unsavory profession, which she simply calls working in “customer service.” When she gets the chance to work as (read: pretend to be) a psychic, she jumps on it, knowing that her ability to manipulate people would make for easy money. She takes on Susan as a client, a housewife with a rocky relationship with her seemingly evil stepson and a house that appears haunted. Is the narrator finally in over her head? One thing is certain: something malicious exists, but where it originates and what can be done to stop it will keep you guessing.

This book, clocking in at 64 pages, is an incredibly short yet satisfying read. It was originally published as part of a collection of short stories — “Rogues,” edited by George R.R. Martin and Gardner Dozois. Flynn acknowledges Martin at the end of the book, thanking him for asking her to write him a story, but this reader would like to thank Flynn for providing us with this intriguing little tale.

The post Staff Review: The Grownup appeared first on DBRL Next.

Categories: More From DBRL...

Book and Tea Pairings

Next Book Buzz - August 19, 2016

tea and book

“You can never get a cup of tea large enough or a book long enough to suit me.” ~ C.S. Lewis

Last year I broke my foot and had to have surgery. That meant recovery time, which actually meant reading time. During the week following my surgery, between bouts of nausea and fatigue, I read the All Souls Trilogy by Deborah Harkness. I also exclusively drank Harney & Sons Green Tea with Coconut Blend. Now anytime I drink that coconut green tea, the scent bombards me with reminders of magic, time travel, alchemy and romance.

While my magical fantasy + coconut green tea pairing happened organically, it inspired me to think up some other tea and book pairings.

Old Man and the Sea book coverClassics like “Jane Eyre,” an enduring romance centered around a strong, non-traditional heroine, or Hemingway’s “The Old Man and the Sea,” in which a fisherman battles with a marlin, need a classic tea, no? I suggest an English Breakfast tea (decaf, if you’re reading past your bedtime).

Seveneves book coverIf you’re interested in books with a more elaborate storyline, perhaps “The Thirteenth Tale” by Diane Setterfield is for you. A famous reclusive author commissions a biographer, and both women must confront family secrets. Or try “Seveneves” by Neal Stephenson. This story follows the progeny of the few survivors from Earth who have lived in space for five thousand years, and now they must return to the drastically changed planet. Whichever book you choose, pair it with the complex and sophisticated Earl Grey to make a great duo.

Hamilton book coverMaybe you’ve managed to get your hands on a copy of “Alexander Hamilton,” the biography by Ron Chernow on which the Tony-winning musical, Hamilton, is based. Or perhaps you’re perusing “Hamilton, the Revolution,” the complete libretto itself, including photos and cast interviews. You’ll want something a little more patriotic, a little less sophisticated (like young and scrappy Hamilton himself): freshly brewed iced tea — sweetened if you’re more of a Southerner like Thomas Jefferson.

Modern Lovers book coverPerhaps some fun and easygoing books are more your cup of tea (ha!). “Not Working” follows the life of Claire, who spontaneously quits her job and loses all semblance of a routine. With her new free time she is forced down a path of self discovery. Emma Straub’s newest, “Modern Lovers,” is about a close bunch of college friends who have grown up and have college-aged children of their own. When their children start having relationships with each other, the parents’ lives begin to unravel. Both of these recently published books are sure to leave you happy and content, and what could go better with a fun story than a refreshing cup of fruity tea? Wild berry would pair excellently with either literary pick.

The post Book and Tea Pairings appeared first on DBRL Next.

Categories: Book Buzz

Book and Tea Pairings

DBRL Next - August 19, 2016

tea and book

“You can never get a cup of tea large enough or a book long enough to suit me.” ~ C.S. Lewis

Last year I broke my foot and had to have surgery. That meant recovery time, which actually meant reading time. During the week following my surgery, between bouts of nausea and fatigue, I read the All Souls Trilogy by Deborah Harkness. I also exclusively drank Harney & Sons Green Tea with Coconut Blend. Now anytime I drink that coconut green tea, the scent bombards me with reminders of magic, time travel, alchemy and romance.

While my magical fantasy + coconut green tea pairing happened organically, it inspired me to think up some other tea and book pairings.

Old Man and the Sea book coverClassics like “Jane Eyre,” an enduring romance centered around a strong, non-traditional heroine, or Hemingway’s “The Old Man and the Sea,” in which a fisherman battles with a marlin, need a classic tea, no? I suggest an English Breakfast tea (decaf, if you’re reading past your bedtime).

Seveneves book coverIf you’re interested in books with a more elaborate storyline, perhaps “The Thirteenth Tale” by Diane Setterfield is for you. A famous reclusive author commissions a biographer, and both women must confront family secrets. Or try “Seveneves” by Neal Stephenson. This story follows the progeny of the few survivors from Earth who have lived in space for five thousand years, and now they must return to the drastically changed planet. Whichever book you choose, pair it with the complex and sophisticated Earl Grey to make a great duo.

Hamilton book coverMaybe you’ve managed to get your hands on a copy of “Alexander Hamilton,” the biography by Ron Chernow on which the Tony-winning musical, Hamilton, is based. Or perhaps you’re perusing “Hamilton, the Revolution,” the complete libretto itself, including photos and cast interviews. You’ll want something a little more patriotic, a little less sophisticated (like young and scrappy Hamilton himself): freshly brewed iced tea — sweetened if you’re more of a Southerner like Thomas Jefferson.

Modern Lovers book coverPerhaps some fun and easygoing books are more your cup of tea (ha!). “Not Working” follows the life of Claire, who spontaneously quits her job and loses all semblance of a routine. With her new free time she is forced down a path of self discovery. Emma Straub’s newest, “Modern Lovers,” is about a close bunch of college friends who have grown up and have college-aged children of their own. When their children start having relationships with each other, the parents’ lives begin to unravel. Both of these recently published books are sure to leave you happy and content, and what could go better with a fun story than a refreshing cup of fruity tea? Wild berry would pair excellently with either literary pick.

The post Book and Tea Pairings appeared first on DBRL Next.

Categories: More From DBRL...

Stay Connected @ Your Library

DBRLTeen - August 19, 2016

With the end of summer and the beginning of a new school year, I wanted to share all the ways the library helps you stay connected to the books and services you love most. All you need is an internet connection, an email address and a library card. Don’t forget to also sign up for our monthly email newsletter to get library program reminders, contest announcements, as well as book reviews and recommendations delivered directly to your inbox.

Like us on Facebook: www.facebook.com/YourDBRL.

Overdrive offers access to thousands of downloadable eBook and audiobook titles, including many of the most popular young adult novels. Whether you enjoy reading on your iPad or Kindle, or listening on your smartphone, this service provides you with free titles to download at anytime. View a list of devices compatible with this service, or download the iOS or Android app.

Hoopla allows you to watch movies and TV shows, listen to music and audiobooks, or read eBooks and comic books with your computer or mobile device for free. Download the Hoopla app for iOSAndroid or Kindle Fire HDX to begin enjoying thousands of titles from major film studios, recording companies and publishers.

Zinio offers over 100 free digital magazines for you to read on your computer, tablet or smartphone such as Seventeen, ESPN, Girl’s Life, Rolling Stone, Teen Vogue, Popular Science, US Weekly and many more. Get the app for your iOS, Android,  Kindle Fire, Blackberry, Nook HD or Windows 8 mobile device.

Freegal allows you to permanently download five free songs per week and listen to five hours of ad-free streaming music daily. Freegal works on most devices and the apps are free through Google Play or the App Store.

Originally published at Stay Connected @ Your Library.

Categories: More From DBRL...
Copyright © 2016 Daniel Boone Regional Library | (573) 443-3161 | web@dbrl.org