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Books for Dudes – Norse Code

DBRLTeen - April 10, 2015

Whether it’s due to the increasing visibility of Marvel’s Thor or because of the History Channel’s popular Vikings series (for mature audiences), Norse mythology has definitely had a resurgence in popularity. Check out these great Norse reads for teens.

 Matt Thorsen constantly feels in the shadow of his older brothers in “Loki’s Wolves” by Kelley Armstrong. He knows every Norse myth, because he lives in a South Dakta town where everyone is a decendent of the Norse legends of old. So, of course, Matt knows of Ragnarok, the supposed end of days in the Norse world. What he didn’t know was that Ragnarok is happening now, and, Matt has been chosen to lead against the forces of evil. A very entertaining Norse tale from our juvenile section, Armstrong’s tale is a great update, and I’d highly recommend this book to lovers of fantasy and mythology–especially fan’s of Rick Riordan’s Percy Jackson series.

Thor has a lot of history, even as a comic character. He first appeared in comics in 1962. He’s been the focus of two movies in the last 10 years in addition to appearing in two Avengers movies (with the second one coming out next month). With all that history, where do you start reading Thor? I recommend Jason Aaron’s newer Thor series, “Thor, God of Thunder.” This series is written as a great-jumping on point, and you don’t need to know a lot about Thor…in fact, this series covers Thor’s past, present, and future! The gods across the universe are being murdered, and Thor is determined to find out what’s happening. The bloody trail leads him on the path of the God Butcher, a great new villain who has deep ties to Thor. Volumes 1 and 2 are part of the God Butcher story line, and Volumes 3 and 4 continue Thor’s adventures.

Welcome to the United States of…Asgard??? In the”The Lost Sun” by Tessa Gratton, seventeen-year-old Soren Bearskin is trying to prove he falls far from the tree. His famed warrior of a father killed thirteen innocents during a battle frenzy, and Soren has similar symptoms of that warrior rage. He tries to remain calm and detached to avoid his father’s fate, but how do you remain calm when a beautiful seer named Astrid tells him she’s been dreaming about him and their intertwined fates? When a popular Asgardian god disappears, it’s up to Soren and Astrid to find him. Lots of interesting turns in this update to Norse mythology.

More Norse gems are popping up all the time. Many readers are excited for Rick Riordan’s new Magnus Chase series, which has ties to his previous Percy Jackson books. The first book in the Magnus Chase and the Gods of Asgard series, “Sword of Summer,” comes out this October.

Originally published at Books for Dudes – Norse Code.

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New DVD List: Keep on Keepin’ on & More

DBRL Next - April 8, 2015

keep on keepin on

Here is a new DVD list highlighting various titles in fiction and nonfiction recently added to the library’s collection.

keeponkeepinonKeep on Keepin’ on
Trailer / Website / Reviews
Playing recently at the Ragtag in conjuction with the “We Always Swing” Jazz Series, this documentary follows jazz legend Clark Terry over four years to document the mentorship between Terry and 23-year-old blind piano prodigy Justin Kauflin as the young man prepares to compete in an elite, international competition.

outlanderOutlander
Season 1
Website / Reviews
TV series based on the book series by author Diana Gabaldon. Claire Randall is a married combat nurse from 1945 who is mysteriously swept back in time to 1743. When she is forced to marry a Scottish warrior, an affair is ignited that tears Claire’s heart between two men.

girlsinthebandGirls in the Band
Trailer / Website / Reviews
Playing last year at the Ragtag in conjuction with the “We Always Swing” Jazz Series, this films tells the poignant, untold stories of female jazz and big band instrumentalists from the late 30s to the present day. The challenges faced by these talented women provide a glimpse into decades of racism and sexism that have existed in America.

silicon valleySilicon Valley
Season 1
Website / Reviews
In the high-tech gold rush of modern Silicon Valley, the people most qualified to succeed are the least capable of handling success. A comedy partially inspired by Mike Judge’s own experiences as a Silicon Valley engineer in the late 1980s.

code blackCode Black
Trailer / Website / Reviews
Physician Ryan McGarry gives an unprecedented access to America’s busiest Emergency Department. Amidst real life-and-death situations, McGarry follows a dedicated team of charismatic young doctors-in-training as they wrestle with both their ideals and the realities of saving lives in a complex and overburdened system.

Other notable releases:
Sons of Anarchy” – Season 7Website / Reviews
Master of the Universe” – Trailer / Website / Reviews
Longmire” – Season 3Website / Reviews
Girls” – Season 1Website / Reviews
Watchers of the Sky” – Trailer / Website / Reviews
The Sixties” – Website / Reviews
House M.D.” – Season 1Website / Reviews
Trailer Park Boys” – Season 1 & Season 2Website / Reviews
Banshee” – Season 1, Season 2Website / Reviews
The Thin Blue Line” – Trailer / Website / Reviews
Veep” – Season 3Website / Reviews
WKRP in Cincinnati” – Season 1, Season 2, Season 3, Season 4Website
Remington Steele” – Season 1, Season 2, Season 3, Seasons 4 & 5Website

The post New DVD List: Keep on Keepin’ on & More appeared first on DBRL Next.

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2015 Teen Book Champion Is Chosen!

Teen Book Buzz - April 7, 2015

2015 March Madness Finalist Banner
After two months of nail-biting competition, central Missouri teens have selected their March Madness Teen Book Tournament Champion. We began with a list of 32 finalists which included bestsellers such as “The Fault in Our Stars” by John Green, “Mockingjay” by Suzanne Collins, and many Gateway and Truman Award nominees. Many thanks to the teachers and school librarians who have supported this program, and to all the teens who have participated! And now, our 2015 champion is….

The Maze Runner” by James Dashner

Stay tuned to teens.dbrl.org for our sneak peek at this year’s teen summer reading challenge, “Every Hero Has a Story.” Through this program, the library challenges young adults to read for 20 hours, share three book reviews, and do seven of our suggested activities. Complete the challenge, and you will be eligible to win some pretty awesome prizes like a black & white Amazon Kindle. Stay informed by subscribing to our email updates!

Originally published at 2015 Teen Book Champion Is Chosen!.

Categories: Book Buzz

2015 Teen Book Champion Is Chosen!

DBRLTeen - April 7, 2015

2015 March Madness Finalist Banner
After two months of nail-biting competition, central Missouri teens have selected their March Madness Teen Book Tournament Champion. We began with a list of 32 finalists which included bestsellers such as “The Fault in Our Stars” by John Green, “Mockingjay” by Suzanne Collins, and many Gateway and Truman Award nominees. Many thanks to the teachers and school librarians who have supported this program, and to all the teens who have participated! And now, our 2015 champion is….

The Maze Runner” by James Dashner

Stay tuned to teens.dbrl.org for our sneak peek at this year’s teen summer reading challenge, “Every Hero Has a Story.” Through this program, the library challenges young adults to read for 20 hours, share three book reviews, and do seven of our suggested activities. Complete the challenge, and you will be eligible to win some pretty awesome prizes like a black & white Amazon Kindle. Stay informed by subscribing to our email updates!

Originally published at 2015 Teen Book Champion Is Chosen!.

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Classics for Everyone: Spoon River Anthology

Next Book Buzz - April 6, 2015

Book cover for Spoon River AnthologyLet’s play literary Jeopardy. The clue is: Making its first appearance in April 1915, this book of poems spoke of life in a fictional Midwestern town and has been the inspiration for numerous theatrical productions, musical compositions in multiple genres and at least one computer game. If you said “What is ‘Spoon River Anthology’ by Edgar Lee Masters?” you won this round.

Masters was a practicing attorney who dabbled in literature on the side. He’d published a few pieces previous to 1915, but “Spoon River Anthology” brought him a level of success that allowed him to quit his law practice and follow his dream of writing full-time.

The fictional village of Spoon River was based on Masters’ hometown of Lewiston, Illinois. Each poem in the book, with the exception of the introductory one, is narrated from the grave by a different deceased town resident. Since there are no consequences to be suffered, the characters can speak with honesty, showing realities of small town life not often acknowledged at the time. People discuss extra-marital affairs, domestic violence, greed, swindling and all manner of pettiness with surprising frankness.

Just as in life, some speak with bitterness and others with contentment. This is true not only of their lives, but also their deaths and graves. A couple of cemetery dwellers quarrel with what’s written on their tombstones. But the town drunk is happy enough with his lot in death, enjoying the prestige of finding himself — through sheer happenstance — the next-door neighbor of a prominent citizen.

Some names come up again and again. The bank president, for instance, affected many lives. By allowing the characters to tell not only their own stories, but also share their memories of family and neighbors, Masters gives readers a more complete view of the life of the town. For instance, the village pharmacist muses on a married couple who have each already had a say about their relationship:

There were Benjamin Pantier and his wife,
Good in themselves, but evil toward each other:
He oxygen, she hydrogen,
Their son, a devastating fire.

Read the book and get to know the late residents of Spoon River. Your life will be richer for it. 100 years later, their voices still resonate.

The post Classics for Everyone: Spoon River Anthology appeared first on DBRL Next.

Categories: Book Buzz

Classics for Everyone: Spoon River Anthology

DBRL Next - April 6, 2015

Book cover for Spoon River AnthologyLet’s play literary Jeopardy. The clue is: Making its first appearance in April 1915, this book of poems spoke of life in a fictional Midwestern town and has been the inspiration for numerous theatrical productions, musical compositions in multiple genres and at least one computer game. If you said “What is ‘Spoon River Anthology’ by Edgar Lee Masters?” you won this round.

Masters was a practicing attorney who dabbled in literature on the side. He’d published a few pieces previous to 1915, but “Spoon River Anthology” brought him a level of success that allowed him to quit his law practice and follow his dream of writing full-time.

The fictional village of Spoon River was based on Masters’ hometown of Lewiston, Illinois. Each poem in the book, with the exception of the introductory one, is narrated from the grave by a different deceased town resident. Since there are no consequences to be suffered, the characters can speak with honesty, showing realities of small town life not often acknowledged at the time. People discuss extra-marital affairs, domestic violence, greed, swindling and all manner of pettiness with surprising frankness.

Just as in life, some speak with bitterness and others with contentment. This is true not only of their lives, but also their deaths and graves. A couple of cemetery dwellers quarrel with what’s written on their tombstones. But the town drunk is happy enough with his lot in death, enjoying the prestige of finding himself — through sheer happenstance — the next-door neighbor of a prominent citizen.

Some names come up again and again. The bank president, for instance, affected many lives. By allowing the characters to tell not only their own stories, but also share their memories of family and neighbors, Masters gives readers a more complete view of the life of the town. For instance, the village pharmacist muses on a married couple who have each already had a say about their relationship:

There were Benjamin Pantier and his wife,
Good in themselves, but evil toward each other:
He oxygen, she hydrogen,
Their son, a devastating fire.

Read the book and get to know the late residents of Spoon River. Your life will be richer for it. 100 years later, their voices still resonate.

The post Classics for Everyone: Spoon River Anthology appeared first on DBRL Next.

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One Read Vote 2015

One Read - April 6, 2015
Vote for the Next One Read Book April 6-24

“The Good Lord Bird”
by James McBride

“Station Eleven”
by Emily St. John Mandel Note: There is a poll embedded within this post, please visit the site to participate in this post's poll.

The post One Read Vote 2015 appeared first on One READ.

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Learn More About the 2015 One Read Finalists

One Read - April 6, 2015

The One Read reading panel narrowed the list of more than 115 book suggestions for the 2015 program to two top contenders. Between now and April 24, cast your vote for either “The Good Lord Bird” by James McBride or “Station Eleven” by Emily St. John Mandel.

The Good Lord Bird by James McBride“The Good Lord Bird” by James McBride

“Little Onion,” a 12-year-old slave actually named Henry, is mistaken for a girl and forced to flee the Kansas territory with abolitionist John Brown after an altercation with his master. The adventures that follow, told in Onion’s vibrant and singular voice, take us from Bloody Kansas to New York and Canada, where we meet the likes of Frederick Douglass and Harriet Tubman, before returning to Virginia and the doomed raid on Harpers Ferry. Sometimes humorous and irreverent, at other times sad and thoughtful, this character-driven novel makes a well-known and tragic time in our nation’s history feel new.

Preview the first few pages of “The Good Lord Bird.”

More information:

Station Eleven by Emily St. John Mandel“Station Eleven” by Emily St. John Mandel

Twenty years after a deadly flu outbreak kills most of the world’s population, what survives? What matters? This haunting novel begins with the on-stage death of a famous actor during his performance of King Lear, which coincides with the beginning of the pandemic. The narrative moves back and forth between the actor’s younger life and 20 years after his death, weaving the stories of a handful of people connected to him – some closely, like his ex-wife, and some by the smallest thread, like the EMT who attempted to save his life. A lyrically written examination of the importance of art and what it means to be human.

Preview the first few pages of “Station Eleven.”

More information:

 

The post Learn More About the 2015 One Read Finalists appeared first on One READ.

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Reader Review: To All The Boys I’ve Loved Before

DBRL Next - April 3, 2015

Editor’s note: This review was submitted by a library patron during the 2014 Adult Summer Reading program. We will continue to periodically share some of these reviews throughout the year.

toalltheboysivelovedbeforeLara Jean seems to think her life if pretty perfect with her sisters and her dad. When her older sister leaves for college, her life takes a sudden unexpected turn. She is left to take over as the “mom” of the family, but the biggest surprise she receives is when her secret love letters, kept in a hatbox, are all accidentally mailed out to all the boys she had feelings for in the past. She learns how to deal with it as each one emerges in her life as they receive them. “To All The Boys I’ve Loved Before” is a great book about a teenage girl learning to navigate her life and new love.

Three words that describe this book: easy read, self-discovery, sweet

You might want to pick this book up if: you like books with a little bit of romance and a high school girl learning how to navigate through life.

-Marisa

The post Reader Review: To All The Boys I’ve Loved Before appeared first on DBRL Next.

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Discover New YA Series and Authors with BookView

DBRLTeen - April 1, 2015

BookViewA cool surprise awaits young adults in the teen section of each of our three library branches. We recently integrated interactive touchscreens called BookViews into our teen displays. This device shares video previews for some of our most popular YA books. It’s a great way to discover new series and authors, or add to your personal reading list. The BookView is updated monthly to provide new book trailers for our ever-expanding collection of YA fiction. Be sure to check it out the next time you are at our facilities in Columbia, Fulton or Ashland!

Originally published at Discover New YA Series and Authors with BookView.

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Ask the Author: An Interview With Keija Parssinen

Next Book Buzz - March 31, 2015

Book cover for The Unraveling of Mercy Louis by Keija ParssinenKeija Parssinen, director of the local Quarry Heights Writers’ Workshop and author of the 2013 One Read book, “The Ruins of Us,” just published her second novel, “The Unraveling of Mercy Louis.” Kirkus Reviews described the book as “a modern Southern gothic with a feminist edge and the tense pacing of a thriller.” In anticipation of her talk at the Columbia Public Library this Thursday, Parssinen kindly agreed to be interviewed as part of DBRL Next’s Ask the Author series.

DBRL: Many of our patrons are familiar with your last novel, “The Ruins of Us,” which was the library’s One Read selection in 2013. That book told the story of a wealthy American-Saudi Arabian family living in Saudi Arabia. “The Unraveling of Mercy Louis” focuses on the stories of younger women and is set in a fictional oil refinery town in southern Texas. Can you discuss some of the differences between these books?

KP: While “The Ruins of Us” unfolds slowly, culminating in a violent act that undoes the Baylani family, “The Unraveling of Mercy Louis” opens with a bang — the discovery of a deceased fetus in a dumpster — and hurtles the reader forward, headlong, into the story. It is also narrated by two teenage girls, so it has a slightly narrower scope than Ruins, though I think both the narrators of Mercy are wise and astute in their own way. The books share more in common than appears at surface level, though — both novels are character-driven, with plot used as a device through which to examine individuals and their broader community. Character psychology, or what makes people act the way they do, is the most interesting thing about fiction, to me, so developing complex, fully dimensional characters in both books was important to me.

DBRL: What were some books or events that inspired “The Unraveling of Mercy Louis”?

KP: The spark of the idea came from an article by Susan Dominus in the New York Times Magazine, titled “What Happened to the Girls in LeRoy,” about a curious case of uncontrollable physical and verbal tics among a group of high school girls in upstate New York. The article immediately made me think of the Salem Witch Trials and Arthur Miller’s “The Crucible,” which is one of my favorite plays. Many of the characters’ names in Mercy Louis are borrowed from Salem, including Mercy’s. Some reviewers have also compared Mercy to “The Scarlet Letter,” which I had in mind, peripherally, while I was writing.

DBRL: The story is told partially from the protagonist, Mercy’s, point of view, and partially from Illa’s, an acquaintance at her school. Why did you choose to tell the story this way?

KP: Mercy is in some ways the classic Gothic heroine, naive to a fault. While she’s tough and strong and smart, she’s not very worldly. Illa is far more shrewd and can give the reader insight into Mercy’s world, and the town of Port Sabine, which Mercy herself can’t give. Plus I’m always drawn to narratives of obsession, and wallflower Illa’s obsession with superstar Mercy is a big plot driver in the novel.

DBRL: This book has been described as a coming-of-age story. Do you think that there is a lack of these types of books, at least ones that are told from the female perspective? Are there some particularly good ones that you’ve read?

KP: One reviewer very kindly compared Mercy to “To Kill a Mockingbird,” that classic Southern bildungsroman. I was very flattered by that comparison. Harper Lee aside, there does seem to be a dearth of classic coming-of-age stories from the female perspective, perhaps because until recently, society hasn’t been able to look honestly at what happens as a girl transitions into womanhood — it’s perhaps too messy, or too sexual, or too ugly. Only boys can make mistakes and then afford to write about them; girls had to hide them away like blemishes, I suppose. Lately, I’ve been devouring Elena Ferrante‘s Neapolitan novels, which offer a blazingly brave tale of coming of age in 1960s/70s Naples. In fact, they present the most astonishing, raw, sincere portrait of girlhood, sex, motherhood, marriage and friendship that I’ve ever read! I can’t say enough good things about these books. They have meant so much to me, as a woman and a writer.

DBRL: Have you read any other good books lately that you would like to recommend to our readers?

KP: See above! But also: I recently loved “Migratory Animals” by Mary Helen Specht, “Limestone Wall” by Marlene Lee, Alice Munro’s “Dear Life” and “Telex From Cuba” by Rachel Kushner.

Don’t miss Keija Parssinen’s author talk this Thursday, April 2nd at 7 p.m. in the Friend’s Room of the Columbia Public Library! Copies of the book will be available for purchase or signing. Also, check out her website to find more events or to learn more about the book.

The post Ask the Author: An Interview With Keija Parssinen appeared first on DBRL Next.

Categories: Book Buzz

Ask the Author: An Interview With Keija Parssinen

DBRL Next - March 31, 2015

Book cover for The Unraveling of Mercy Louis by Keija ParssinenKeija Parssinen, director of the local Quarry Heights Writers’ Workshop and author of the 2013 One Read book, “The Ruins of Us,” just published her second novel, “The Unraveling of Mercy Louis.” Kirkus Reviews described the book as “a modern Southern gothic with a feminist edge and the tense pacing of a thriller.” In anticipation of her talk at the Columbia Public Library this Thursday, Parssinen kindly agreed to be interviewed as part of DBRL Next’s Ask the Author series.

DBRL: Many of our patrons are familiar with your last novel, “The Ruins of Us,” which was the library’s One Read selection in 2013. That book told the story of a wealthy American-Saudi Arabian family living in Saudi Arabia. “The Unraveling of Mercy Louis” focuses on the stories of younger women and is set in a fictional oil refinery town in southern Texas. Can you discuss some of the differences between these books?

KP: While “The Ruins of Us” unfolds slowly, culminating in a violent act that undoes the Baylani family, “The Unraveling of Mercy Louis” opens with a bang — the discovery of a deceased fetus in a dumpster — and hurtles the reader forward, headlong, into the story. It is also narrated by two teenage girls, so it has a slightly narrower scope than Ruins, though I think both the narrators of Mercy are wise and astute in their own way. The books share more in common than appears at surface level, though — both novels are character-driven, with plot used as a device through which to examine individuals and their broader community. Character psychology, or what makes people act the way they do, is the most interesting thing about fiction, to me, so developing complex, fully dimensional characters in both books was important to me.

DBRL: What were some books or events that inspired “The Unraveling of Mercy Louis”?

KP: The spark of the idea came from an article by Susan Dominus in the New York Times Magazine, titled “What Happened to the Girls in LeRoy,” about a curious case of uncontrollable physical and verbal tics among a group of high school girls in upstate New York. The article immediately made me think of the Salem Witch Trials and Arthur Miller’s “The Crucible,” which is one of my favorite plays. Many of the characters’ names in Mercy Louis are borrowed from Salem, including Mercy’s. Some reviewers have also compared Mercy to “The Scarlet Letter,” which I had in mind, peripherally, while I was writing.

DBRL: The story is told partially from the protagonist, Mercy’s, point of view, and partially from Illa’s, an acquaintance at her school. Why did you choose to tell the story this way?

KP: Mercy is in some ways the classic Gothic heroine, naive to a fault. While she’s tough and strong and smart, she’s not very worldly. Illa is far more shrewd and can give the reader insight into Mercy’s world, and the town of Port Sabine, which Mercy herself can’t give. Plus I’m always drawn to narratives of obsession, and wallflower Illa’s obsession with superstar Mercy is a big plot driver in the novel.

DBRL: This book has been described as a coming-of-age story. Do you think that there is a lack of these types of books, at least ones that are told from the female perspective? Are there some particularly good ones that you’ve read?

KP: One reviewer very kindly compared Mercy to “To Kill a Mockingbird,” that classic Southern bildungsroman. I was very flattered by that comparison. Harper Lee aside, there does seem to be a dearth of classic coming-of-age stories from the female perspective, perhaps because until recently, society hasn’t been able to look honestly at what happens as a girl transitions into womanhood — it’s perhaps too messy, or too sexual, or too ugly. Only boys can make mistakes and then afford to write about them; girls had to hide them away like blemishes, I suppose. Lately, I’ve been devouring Elena Ferrante‘s Neapolitan novels, which offer a blazingly brave tale of coming of age in 1960s/70s Naples. In fact, they present the most astonishing, raw, sincere portrait of girlhood, sex, motherhood, marriage and friendship that I’ve ever read! I can’t say enough good things about these books. They have meant so much to me, as a woman and a writer.

DBRL: Have you read any other good books lately that you would like to recommend to our readers?

KP: See above! But also: I recently loved “Migratory Animals” by Mary Helen Specht, “Limestone Wall” by Marlene Lee, Alice Munro’s “Dear Life” and “Telex From Cuba” by Rachel Kushner.

Don’t miss Keija Parssinen’s author talk this Thursday, April 2nd at 7 p.m. in the Friend’s Room of the Columbia Public Library! Copies of the book will be available for purchase or signing. Also, check out her website to find more events or to learn more about the book.

The post Ask the Author: An Interview With Keija Parssinen appeared first on DBRL Next.

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Vote for the 2015 One Read Book

One Read - March 31, 2015

The One Read reading panel has narrowed this year’s nominated titles down to two finalists. What one book should our community read together this year? Vote starting Monday, April 6!

The post Vote for the 2015 One Read Book appeared first on One READ.

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What to Read While You Wait for All the Light We Cannot See

Next Book Buzz - March 30, 2015

Book cover for All the Light We Cannot SeeBestseller “All the Light We cannot See” by Anthony Doerr has a long waiting list at the library. This is a tale of two young people – blind Marie-Laure, living with her father in France, and Werner, a teenage orphan who as a child in Germany had great tenacity to learn all he could about radios and transmitting. Their paths cross when he, now a soldier in the the Nazi army, intercepts Marie-Laure’s innocent (but forbidden) reading of Jules Verne over the radio. If you find yourself on the waiting list for this work of historical fiction, here are a few other choices you might find enjoyable.

Book cover for Jacob's Oath by Martin FletcherJacob’s Oath” by Martin Fletcher

World War II has come to an end. Europe’s roads are clogged with homeless holocaust survivors. One survivor, Jacob, is consumed with hatred for the concentration camp guard nicknamed “The Rat” for killing his brother as well as many others. He meets Sarah on his journey home and falls in love. Now, he must choose to avenge the past or let it go and build a new life with Sarah.

Book cover for In the Wolf's Mouth by Adam FouldsIn the Wolf’s Mouth” by Adam Foulds

In this work of literary fiction set in Sicily at the end of World War II, as the allies chase the Nazis out into the Italian mainland, two parallel stories unfold. One focuses on two service men – Will Walker, English field security officer, and Ray Marifione, an Italian-American infantry man. The second story explores the presence of the mafia through the eyes of a young shepherd named Angilu and Ciro Albanese, a local Mafioso. The war is portrayed as just a temporary distraction from what is really going on in Sicily.

The Invisible Bridge” by Julie Orringer

In 1937 Budapest three brothers leave home to find their calling. Andras-Levi, architectural student, heads to Paris with a letter he promised to deliver to C. Morgenstern, with whom he ends up having a complicated relationship. His older brother heads to Modena to medical school as his younger brother leaves school for the stage. At the end of Andras’ second year in Paris, the Germans occupy the city, thrusting the brothers into the erupting war.

The post What to Read While You Wait for All the Light We Cannot See appeared first on DBRL Next.

Categories: Book Buzz

What to Read While You Wait for All the Light We Cannot See

DBRL Next - March 30, 2015

Book cover for All the Light We Cannot SeeBestseller “All the Light We cannot See” by Anthony Doerr has a long waiting list at the library. This is a tale of two young people – blind Marie-Laure, living with her father in France, and Werner, a teenage orphan who as a child in Germany had great tenacity to learn all he could about radios and transmitting. Their paths cross when he, now a soldier in the the Nazi army, intercepts Marie-Laure’s innocent (but forbidden) reading of Jules Verne over the radio. If you find yourself on the waiting list for this work of historical fiction, here are a few other choices you might find enjoyable.

Book cover for Jacob's Oath by Martin FletcherJacob’s Oath” by Martin Fletcher

World War II has come to an end. Europe’s roads are clogged with homeless holocaust survivors. One survivor, Jacob, is consumed with hatred for the concentration camp guard nicknamed “The Rat” for killing his brother as well as many others. He meets Sarah on his journey home and falls in love. Now, he must choose to avenge the past or let it go and build a new life with Sarah.

Book cover for In the Wolf's Mouth by Adam FouldsIn the Wolf’s Mouth” by Adam Foulds

In this work of literary fiction set in Sicily at the end of World War II, as the allies chase the Nazis out into the Italian mainland, two parallel stories unfold. One focuses on two service men – Will Walker, English field security officer, and Ray Marifione, an Italian-American infantry man. The second story explores the presence of the mafia through the eyes of a young shepherd named Angilu and Ciro Albanese, a local Mafioso. The war is portrayed as just a temporary distraction from what is really going on in Sicily.

The Invisible Bridge” by Julie Orringer

In 1937 Budapest three brothers leave home to find their calling. Andras-Levi, architectural student, heads to Paris with a letter he promised to deliver to C. Morgenstern, with whom he ends up having a complicated relationship. His older brother heads to Modena to medical school as his younger brother leaves school for the stage. At the end of Andras’ second year in Paris, the Germans occupy the city, thrusting the brothers into the erupting war.

The post What to Read While You Wait for All the Light We Cannot See appeared first on DBRL Next.

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2015 Gateway and Truman Award Predictions

Teen Book Buzz - March 30, 2015

2015 Predicted Gateway-Truman WinnersThe Gateway Readers Award honors a young adult book as selected by high school students, while the Truman Readers Award is chosen by junior high students. Even though these awards are administered by the Missouri Association of School Librarians (MASL), it is the responsibility of Missouri teens to choose the actual winner.  Based on circulation figures throughout our library system, DBRLTeen predicts that the following books will be recognized as this year’s top titles:

Predicted Gateway Readers Award winners:

Predicted Truman Readers Award winners:

  • First Place: “Cinder” by Marissa Meyer
  • Second Place: “The False Prince” by Jennifer A. Nielsen
  • Third Place: “The Raft” by S.A. Bodeen

The actual award winners will be announced at the MASL Spring Conference in mid-April.  Subscribe to our email updates to have the results delivered directly to your inbox!

Originally published at 2015 Gateway and Truman Award Predictions.

Categories: Book Buzz

2015 Gateway and Truman Award Predictions

DBRLTeen - March 30, 2015

2015 Predicted Gateway-Truman WinnersThe Gateway Readers Award honors a young adult book as selected by high school students, while the Truman Readers Award is chosen by junior high students. Even though these awards are administered by the Missouri Association of School Librarians (MASL), it is the responsibility of Missouri teens to choose the actual winner.  Based on circulation figures throughout our library system, DBRLTeen predicts that the following books will be recognized as this year’s top titles:

Predicted Gateway Readers Award winners:

Predicted Truman Readers Award winners:

  • First Place: “Cinder” by Marissa Meyer
  • Second Place: “The False Prince” by Jennifer A. Nielsen
  • Third Place: “The Raft” by S.A. Bodeen

The actual award winners will be announced at the MASL Spring Conference in mid-April.  Subscribe to our email updates to have the results delivered directly to your inbox!

Originally published at 2015 Gateway and Truman Award Predictions.

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Top Ten Books Librarians Love: The April 2015 List

Next Book Buzz - March 27, 2015

Library Reads LogoSpring has sprung! And with spring arrives a new crop of LibraryReads books, the top ten titles publishing in April and recommended by librarians across the country. With new books from old favorites like Sara Gruen and Elizabeth Berg, this month’s list contains nothing but novels and is heavy on the historical fiction. A little romance and some twisty thrillers round out the list. Enjoy!

Book cover for At the Water's EdgeAt the Water’s Edge” by Sara Gruen
“Set in Loch Ness, right in the middle of WWII, a foolish group of rich Americans arrive in search of the famous monster. Narrator Maddie must make sense of the circumstances that have brought her to this wild locale. Only then can she discover the strength she needs to make her own decisions. Enjoy a delightfully intriguing cast of characters and the engaging style of storytelling that has made Gruen so popular.” – Paulette Brooks, Elm Grove Public Library, Elm Grove, WI

Book cover for A Desperate FortuneA Desperate Fortune” by Susanna Kearsley
“While transcribing an old manuscript of a young girl’s diary, Sara decodes an account of Jacobite spies. Long before, Mary Dundas gets involved in a mission which makes her confidante to the King of Scotland in exile. And along the way, both women fall for men they know little about. Kearsley is a master at seamlessly blending stories from two time periods. Readers who enjoy a little puzzle solving with their historical fiction will be rewarded.” – Kimberly McGee, Lake Travis Community Library, Austin, TX

Book cover for The Dream Lover by Elizabeth BergThe Dream Lover” by Elizabeth Berg
“George Sand leaves her estranged husband and children to embark on a life of art in bohemian Paris. A talented writer who finds monetary and critical success, Sand adopts a man’s name, often dresses as a gentleman and smokes cigars. Through her writing, politics, sexual complexities and views on feminism, Sand is always seeking love. This novel has spurred me to learn more about George Sand, a woman truly ahead of her time.” – Catherine Coyne, Mansfield Public Library, Mansfield, MA

And here is the rest of the list with links to our catalog so you can place holds on these forthcoming books.

The post Top Ten Books Librarians Love: The April 2015 List appeared first on DBRL Next.

Categories: Book Buzz

Top Ten Books Librarians Love: The April 2015 List

DBRL Next - March 27, 2015

Library Reads LogoSpring has sprung! And with spring arrives a new crop of LibraryReads books, the top ten titles publishing in April and recommended by librarians across the country. With new books from old favorites like Sara Gruen and Elizabeth Berg, this month’s list contains nothing but novels and is heavy on the historical fiction. A little romance and some twisty thrillers round out the list. Enjoy!

Book cover for At the Water's EdgeAt the Water’s Edge” by Sara Gruen
“Set in Loch Ness, right in the middle of WWII, a foolish group of rich Americans arrive in search of the famous monster. Narrator Maddie must make sense of the circumstances that have brought her to this wild locale. Only then can she discover the strength she needs to make her own decisions. Enjoy a delightfully intriguing cast of characters and the engaging style of storytelling that has made Gruen so popular.” - Paulette Brooks, Elm Grove Public Library, Elm Grove, WI

Book cover for A Desperate FortuneA Desperate Fortune” by Susanna Kearsley
“While transcribing an old manuscript of a young girl’s diary, Sara decodes an account of Jacobite spies. Long before, Mary Dundas gets involved in a mission which makes her confidante to the King of Scotland in exile. And along the way, both women fall for men they know little about. Kearsley is a master at seamlessly blending stories from two time periods. Readers who enjoy a little puzzle solving with their historical fiction will be rewarded.” - Kimberly McGee, Lake Travis Community Library, Austin, TX

Book cover for The Dream Lover by Elizabeth BergThe Dream Lover” by Elizabeth Berg
“George Sand leaves her estranged husband and children to embark on a life of art in bohemian Paris. A talented writer who finds monetary and critical success, Sand adopts a man’s name, often dresses as a gentleman and smokes cigars. Through her writing, politics, sexual complexities and views on feminism, Sand is always seeking love. This novel has spurred me to learn more about George Sand, a woman truly ahead of her time.” - Catherine Coyne, Mansfield Public Library, Mansfield, MA

And here is the rest of the list with links to our catalog so you can place holds on these forthcoming books.

The post Top Ten Books Librarians Love: The April 2015 List appeared first on DBRL Next.

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2015 Teen Book Tournament Finalists Announced

DBRLTeen - March 26, 2015

2015 March Madness Finalists2VOTE NOW through April 1 for the tournament champion!

Three months of reading and preparation have led to this moment: the announcement of our teen book tournament finalists! Thank you to all the students who have shared their favorites with us. So far, we’ve collected over 200 ballots from dozens of area teens. With each round of voting, teens’ names have been entered into a drawing for a chance to win cool prizes like free book sets or a Barnes & Noble gift  card. Prize winners will be announced on Tuesday, April 7 when we announce our tournament champion.

March Madness Teen Book Tournament Finalists

The Maze Runner” by James Dashner
vs.
Legend” by Marie Lu

Don’t forget to VOTE for your favorite title by Wednesday, April 1 at 3 p.m. You may vote online at teens.dbrl.org or pick up a paper ballot at one of our three branch locations.

Originally published at 2015 Teen Book Tournament Finalists Announced.

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