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Prison Reform and Zombie Pandemics: This Week in Community Events

Next Book Buzz - February 3, 2014

I moved to Columbia to attend university and never left. I love the trails, and living in a college town affords me opportunities that might not be present in a city of similar size. This week, I have two such opportunities. Columbia will be visited by two popular authors: Piper Kerman and Colson Whitehead. Both events are free and open to the public.

Book cover for Orange Is the New Black by Piper KermanEditor’s note: due to weather, Piper Kerman’s talk is being rescheduled. She will not appear at the Missouri Theatre on February 5 as previously advertised. We will provide an update when we have one. 

Piper Kerman, author of the memoir “Orange is the New Black: My Year in a Women’s Prison,” will speak at the Missouri Theatre on Wednesday, February 5 at 7:30 p.m. Kerman served time in federal prison for a crime she had committed a decade prior to incarceration. As viewers of the Netflix series based on her memoir can attest, Kerman’s experience ranges from funny to tragic. Kerman will talk about both her experience specifically and the prison system in general.

Book cover for Zone One by Colson WhiteheadThe following night, Colson Whitehead, author of the New York Times bestselling zombie survival tale “Zone One,” will be the latest speaker in the Department of English Creative Writing Visiting Writers Series. The event will take place Thursday, February 6 at 7:30 p.m. in the Reynolds Alumni Center on the University of Missouri campus. Whitehead writes everything from autobiographical essays to post-apocalyptic novels and has won loads of awards. His latest book, “The Noble Hustle: Poker, Beef Jerky and Death,” is about the World Series of Poker and will be published in May.

The post Prison Reform and Zombie Pandemics: This Week in Community Events appeared first on DBRL Next.

Categories: Book Buzz

Win Two Free Lux Passes to the True/False Film Fest

Center Aisle Cinema - February 3, 2014

True False LogoDue to the icy weather conditions, we were forced to cancel both sessions of our ”How to True/False” event this past weekend. Now that preparations for the film festival are in full force, we will not be able to reschedule this program. If you are a first-time attendee, we recommend reviewing “How to Festival,” an online guide for newbies available on the True/False website.

We also wanted to share that the library will be raffling two free Lux passes to one lucky winner. You must register online to enter. These passes, valued at $175 each, will give you nearly unlimited access to the festival’s most popular films and special events. The winner will be selected at random and contacted on Tuesday, February 4. One entry per person, please. You must live in Boone or Callaway County to be eligible.

Don’t forget that the library has an extensive collection of documentaries for you to borrow for free with your library card. We have dozens of former True/False selections for you to enjoy along with popular television series like “Downton Abbey” and “Sherlock.”  Our next free screening at the library will be April 23 when we show “Herman’s House,”  a documentary that demonstrates the transformative power of art.

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2014 ALA Teen Book Award Winners Announced

Teen Book Buzz - February 3, 2014
Erin Morgenstern

Me and Erin Morgenstern, author of “The Night Circus”

Every January the American Library Association hosts its annual Youth Media Awards Press Conference. At this time, authors and illustrators of children’s and young adult literature are recognized for the amazing works they have published over the last year. Below is a list of this year’s award-winning titles.

My personal favorites are the Printz Award and the Alex Award. The Printz Award honors an author for “excellence in literature written for young adults.” In other words, it’s a pretty big deal. My favorite Printz Award winner, so far, has been “Looking for Alaska“ by John Green.

The Alex Award, however, honors the top 10 adult books with teen appeal. My favorite among the Alex Award recipients has been “The Night Circus.” I even got to meet the author, Erin Morgenstern! Squee!

Have you read any of this year’s award-winners? What did you think? Who might you have picked for this year’s top awards?

Michael L. Printz Award for excellence in literature written for young adults.

William C. Morris Award for a debut book published by a first-time author writing for teens.

YALSA Award for Excellence in Nonfiction for Young Adults honors the best nonfiction book published for young adults.

Alex Award Winners are the 10 best adult books that appeal to teen audiences.

Odyssey Award for best audiobook produced for children and/or young adult.

  • Award Winner: “Scowler,”written by Daniel Kraus and narrated by Kirby Heyborne
  • Honor Book: “Better Nate Than Ever,” written and narrated by Tim Federle
  • Honor Book: “Creepy Carrots!” written by Aaron Reynolds
  • Honor Book: “Eleanor & Park,” written by Rainbow Rowell, and narrated by Rebecca Lowman and Sunil Malhotra
  • Matilda,” written by Roald Dahl, and narrated by Kate Winslet

Coretta Scott King (Author) Book Award recognizes an African American author and illustrator of outstanding books for children and young adults:

Pura Belpré (Author) Award honors a Latino writer whose children’s books best portray, affirm and celebrate the Latino cultural experience:

Stonewall Children’s and Young Adult Literature Award is given annually to children’s and young adult books of exceptional merit relating to the gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgendered experience.

Schneider Family Book Award for books that embody an artistic expression of the disability experience.

Mildred L. Batchelder Award for an outstanding children’s book originally published in a language other than English in a country other than the United States.

  • Award Winner:  “Mister Orange,” written by Truus Matti, translated by Laura Watkinson
  • Honor Book: “Vacation of My Life,” written by Charlotte Moundlic, illustrated by Olivier Tallec, translated by Claudia Zoe Bedrick
  • Honor Book: “My Father’s Arms Are a Boat,” written by Stein Erik Lunde, illustrated by Øyvind Torseter, translated by Kari Dickson
  • Honor Book: “The War Within These Walls,” written by Aline Sax, illustrated by Caryl Strzelecki, translated by Laura Watkinson

Originally published at 2014 ALA Teen Book Award Winners Announced.

Categories: Book Buzz

2014 ALA Teen Book Award Winners Announced

DBRLTeen - February 3, 2014
Erin Morgenstern

Me and Erin Morgenstern, author of “The Night Circus”

Every January the American Library Association hosts its annual Youth Media Awards Press Conference. At this time, authors and illustrators of children’s and young adult literature are recognized for the amazing works they have published over the last year. Below is a list of this year’s award-winning titles.

My personal favorites are the Printz Award and the Alex Award. The Printz Award honors an author for “excellence in literature written for young adults.” In other words, it’s a pretty big deal. My favorite Printz Award winner, so far, has been “Looking for Alaska“ by John Green.

The Alex Award, however, honors the top 10 adult books with teen appeal. My favorite among the Alex Award recipients has been “The Night Circus.” I even got to meet the author, Erin Morgenstern! Squee!

Have you read any of this year’s award-winners? What did you think? Who might you have picked for this year’s top awards?

Michael L. Printz Award for excellence in literature written for young adults.

William C. Morris Award for a debut book published by a first-time author writing for teens.

YALSA Award for Excellence in Nonfiction for Young Adults honors the best nonfiction book published for young adults.

Alex Award Winners are the 10 best adult books that appeal to teen audiences.

Odyssey Award for best audiobook produced for children and/or young adult.

  • Award Winner: “Scowler,”written by Daniel Kraus and narrated by Kirby Heyborne
  • Honor Book: “Better Nate Than Ever,” written and narrated by Tim Federle
  • Honor Book: “Creepy Carrots!” written by Aaron Reynolds
  • Honor Book: “Eleanor & Park,” written by Rainbow Rowell, and narrated by Rebecca Lowman and Sunil Malhotra
  • Matilda,” written by Roald Dahl, and narrated by Kate Winslet

Coretta Scott King (Author) Book Award recognizes an African American author and illustrator of outstanding books for children and young adults:

Pura Belpré (Author) Award honors a Latino writer whose children’s books best portray, affirm and celebrate the Latino cultural experience:

Stonewall Children’s and Young Adult Literature Award is given annually to children’s and young adult books of exceptional merit relating to the gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgendered experience.

Schneider Family Book Award for books that embody an artistic expression of the disability experience.

Mildred L. Batchelder Award for an outstanding children’s book originally published in a language other than English in a country other than the United States.

  • Award Winner:  “Mister Orange,” written by Truus Matti, translated by Laura Watkinson
  • Honor Book: “Vacation of My Life,” written by Charlotte Moundlic, illustrated by Olivier Tallec, translated by Claudia Zoe Bedrick
  • Honor Book: “My Father’s Arms Are a Boat,” written by Stein Erik Lunde, illustrated by Øyvind Torseter, translated by Kari Dickson
  • Honor Book: “The War Within These Walls,” written by Aline Sax, illustrated by Caryl Strzelecki, translated by Laura Watkinson

Originally published at 2014 ALA Teen Book Award Winners Announced.

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Win Two Free Lux Passes to the True/False Film Fest

DBRL Next - January 31, 2014

Editor’s Note: Thanks to all those who registered for our Lux pass giveaway. We are happy to announce that Helen Katz is the lucky winner! This Saturday, February 1,  the Columbia Public Library will be hosting our third annual “How …
Continue reading »

The post Win Two Free Lux Passes to the True/False Film Fest appeared first on DBRL Next.

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Financial Aid Fridays: Minority Report

DBRLTeen - January 31, 2014

Diverse StudentsToday, there are more women and people of color attending college then ever before. In an effort to provide equal access to higher education and promote campus diversity, colleges and civic organizations provide financial aid exclusively to these groups.

As a Mexican American, I received a minority scholarship from the American Library Association. Without it, I would never have been able to afford the graduate school required to become a librarian. If you are investigating minority scholarships, below are a few online resources to help you get started.

Gates Millennium Scholars: This scholarship program is intended to increase the number of African-Americans, American Indians/Alaska Natives, Asian Pacific Americans and Hispanic Americans completing undergraduate and graduate degree programs.

United Negro College Fund: This link will take you to a listing of scholarships offered or promoted through the UNCF.

American Indian College Fund: Learn about the two different scholarship programs available, the Tribal Colleges and Universities scholarship program and The Full Circle scholarship program.

Hispanic College Fund: Review the scholarships available based on your current class level.

Asian & Pacific Islander American Scholarship Fund: The APIASF administers nearly 15 different scholarships each year and offers a listing of additional funding opportunities available to Asian and Pacific Islander Americans.

Don’t forget to stop by the library to review these helpful resources. While the newest editions of these reference titles do not circulate, you may borrow the older editions.

Photo credit: Baha’ibow! by Lorenia via Flickr. Used under creative commons license.

Originally published at Financial Aid Fridays: Minority Report.

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Docs Around Town: Jan. 31 – Feb. 6

Center Aisle Cinema - January 30, 2014

20feetfromstardomFebruary 1: How to True False at Columbia Public Library, free. (via)
February 1: Third Goal International Film Festival at the MU Student Center, free. (via)
February 3
:
 “20 Feet From Stardom” 5:00 p.m. & 7:00 p.m. at  Forum 8. (via)
February 4: “God Loves Uganda” starts at Ragtag. (via)
February 5: “Is the Man Who Is Tall Happy?” starts at Ragtag. (via)
February 6: “Fuel” 7:00 p.m. at the MU Student Center, free. (via)

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Ready to Start Making Movies? You’re in the Right Place!

DBRL Next - January 30, 2014

Thanks in large part to the True/False Film Festival, Mid-Missouri has developed a reputation for supporting independent movies. From our documentary film series Center Aisle Cinema to our collection of books on filmmaking and screenwriting, your library has plenty of resources to increase your appreciation of film and provide inspiration should you want to make a movie of your own.
Continue reading »

The post Ready to Start Making Movies? You’re in the Right Place! appeared first on DBRL Next.

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New DVD: “The Act of Killing”

Center Aisle Cinema - January 29, 2014

theactofkilling

We recently added “The Act of Killing” to the DBRL collection. This film played at the True/False Film Festival in 2013, and currently has a rating of 95% from critics at Rotten Tomatoes. Here’s a synopsis from our catalog:

The filmmakers examine a country where death squad leaders are celebrated as heroes, challenging them to reenact their real-life mass-killings in the style of the American movies they love.

Check out the film trailer or the official film site for more info.

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Program Preview: Reinvent Your T-Shirt

DBRLTeen - January 29, 2014

Reinvent Your T-ShirtTshirt Scarf
Thursday, February 13 › 5:30-7 p.m.
Columbia Public Library

Bring your old t-shirts, and we’ll transform them into new fashions, such as scarves, bracelets and headbands. Ages 12 and older, adults welcome. Registration begins Tuesday, February 4. Call (573) 443-3161 to sign-up!

If you are into upcycled crafts, you should consider borrowing some of these titles from the library:

Photo credit: Upcycled T-Shirt Scarf by Kim Piper Werker via Flickr. Used under creative commons license. Check out the tutorial to make this awesome scarf!

Originally published at Program Preview: Reinvent Your T-Shirt.

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New DVD: “The Graduates”

Center Aisle Cinema - January 27, 2014

thegraduates

We recently added “The Graduates” to the DBRL collection. The film was shown in last October on the PBS series Independent Lens. Here’s a synopsis from our catalog:

This two-part special examines the many roots of the Latino dropout crisis through the eyes of six inspiring young students who are part of an ongoing effort to increase graduation rates for a growing Latino population.

Check out the film trailer or the official film site for more info.

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Top Ten Books Librarians Love: The February List

Next Book Buzz - January 27, 2014

LibraryReads_banner1_FEBRUARY

Last year I encouraged you to read like a librarian and use the newly launched Library Reads list to find out what about-to-be-published books we library folks across the country are most abuzz about. Well, get ready to add more titles to your holds list – the February edition of Library Reads is here.

Book cover for Red Rising by Pierce BrownRed Rising
by Pierce Brown
“The next great read for those who loved The Hunger Games. This story has so much action, intrigue, social commentary and character development that the reader who never reads science fiction will happily overlook the fact that the story takes place on Mars far in the future. The characters are perfectly flawed, causing the reader to feel compassion and revulsion for both sides. Can’t wait for the next installment!”
- Cindy Stevens, Pioneer Library System, Norman, OK

Book cover for The Good Luck of Right Now by Matthew QuickThe Good Luck of Right Now
by Matthew Quick
“Socially-awkward 40-year-old Bartholomew has lived with his mother all his life and has never held a job. When she succumbs to cancer, he channels her favorite actor, Richard Gere, to make her happy during her last days. Funny and sad, with moving, unsentimental prose and a quick, satisfying pace. Highly recommended.”
- Michael Colford, Boston Public Library, Boston, MA

Book cover for This Dark Road to Mercy by Wiley CashThis Dark Road to Mercy: A Novel
by Wiley Cash
“Cash’s second novel is as good as his first. In this story, we meet Easter and her sister Ruby, who have been shuffled around the foster care system in Gastonia, North Carolina. Then their ne’er-do-well father whisks them away in the middle of the night. I was on the edge of my seat as I followed the girls’ tale and hoping for a safe outcome. Fans of ‘A Land More Kind Than Home’ will enjoy this book as well.”
- Robin Nesbitt, Columbus Metropolitan Library, Columbus, OH

Here are the remaining titles on February’s list that are on order and ready for you to place on hold. Be the first among your friends to get your hands on these great reads!

The post Top Ten Books Librarians Love: The February List appeared first on DBRL Next.

Categories: Book Buzz

Top Ten Books Librarians Love – The February List

DBRL Next - January 27, 2014

LibraryReads_banner1_FEBRUARY

Last year I encouraged you to read like a librarian and use the newly launched Library Reads list to find out what about-to-be-published books we library folks across the country are most abuzz about. Well, get ready to add more titles to your holds list – the February edition of Library Reads is here.

Book cover for Red Rising by Pierce BrownRed Rising
by Pierce Brown
“The next great read for those who loved The Hunger Games. This story has so much action, intrigue, social commentary and character development that the reader who never reads science fiction will happily overlook the fact that the story takes place on Mars far in the future. The characters are perfectly flawed, causing the reader to feel compassion and revulsion for both sides. Can’t wait for the next installment!”
- Cindy Stevens, Pioneer Library System, Norman, OK

Book cover for The Good Luck of Right Now by Matthew QuickThe Good Luck of Right Now
by Matthew Quick
“Socially-awkward 40-year-old Bartholomew has lived with his mother all his life and has never held a job. When she succumbs to cancer, he channels her favorite actor, Richard Gere, to make her happy during her last days. Funny and sad, with moving, unsentimental prose and a quick, satisfying pace. Highly recommended.”
- Michael Colford, Boston Public Library, Boston, MA

Book cover for This Dark Road to Mercy by Wiley CashThis Dark Road to Mercy: A Novel
by Wiley Cash
“Cash’s second novel is as good as his first. In this story, we meet Easter and her sister Ruby, who have been shuffled around the foster care system in Gastonia, North Carolina. Then their ne’er-do-well father whisks them away in the middle of the night. I was on the edge of my seat as I followed the girls’ tale and hoping for a safe outcome. Fans of ‘A Land More Kind Than Home’ will enjoy this book as well.”
- Robin Nesbitt, Columbus Metropolitan Library, Columbus, OH

Here are the remaining titles on February’s list that are on order and ready for you to place on hold. Be the first among your friends to get your hands on these great reads!

The post Top Ten Books Librarians Love – The February List appeared first on DBRL Next.

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Congratulations to Our Audiobook Winners!

DBRL Next - January 24, 2014

TrophyImagine balloons and confetti dropping from the ceiling as you read this post. A big congratulations to the winners of our audiobook giveaway! Renee won a copy of “The Age of Miracles” by Karen Thompson Walker, and LaShawn received “The Future” by Al Gore. Thanks to everyone who entered.

If you weren’t a winner this time around, don’t fret. We have more freebies in the works, so check back in the upcoming weeks to learn how to enter our next giveaway!

The post Congratulations to Our Audiobook Winners! appeared first on DBRL Next.

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Financial Aid Fridays: Scholarships vs. Loans

DBRLTeen - January 24, 2014

Money LaunderingGrants and loans and scholarships, oh my! With so many options to fund your college education, it’s easy to see how one might get confused. Here’s a basic breakdown of the most common forms of financial aid as defined by FinAid.org:

Scholarships: Scholarships are forms of aid that help students pay for their education. Unlike student loans, scholarships do not have to be repaid. Generally, scholarships are reserved for students with special qualifications, such as academic, athletic or artistic talent. Awards are also available for students who are interested in particular fields of study, who are members of underrepresented groups, who live in certain areas of the country or who demonstrate financial need.

Grants: Grants are a form of financial aid, based on need, which you do not have to repay. Most commonly, grants are awarded by the federal government and based on the responses provided on your FAFSA form.

Loans: An education loan is a form of financial aid that must be repaid, with interest. Education loans come in three major categories: student loans (e.g., Stafford and Perkins loans), parent loans (e.g., PLUS loans) and private student loans (also called alternative student loans). More than $100 billion in federal education loans and $10 billion in private student loans are borrowed each year. In order to qualify for student loans, you must complete the FAFSA form.

Here are some great books for you to borrow from the library to help you investigate general sources for scholarship funding:

Photo credit: Laundering Money by Images of Money via Flickr. Used under creative commons license.

Originally published at Financial Aid Fridays: Scholarships vs. Loans.

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Docs Around Town: Jan. 24 – Jan. 30

Center Aisle Cinema - January 23, 2014

inequalityforallJanuary 27: “Inequality for All” 5:00 p.m. & 7:00 p.m. at  Forum 8. (via)
January 29: “Justice for My Sister” 7:00 p.m. at Stephens College Charters Auditorium, free. Filmmaker in attendance. (via)

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How to True/False on February 1st

Center Aisle Cinema - January 22, 2014

howtotruefalse

Saturday, February 1
Session one: 10:30-11:30 a.m. or Session two: Noon-1 p.m.

Columbia Public Library, Friends Room

Get ready for the True/False Film Festival with 102.3 BXR and 1400 KFRU. You’ll get a step-by-step explanation of all things True/False, including a Q&A session with fest organizers and an exclusive sneak peek at a few films before the schedule is released. This program is expected to fill up, so we’re offering two sessions of the same program that you can attend. Find additional parking in the library’s north lot.

Don’t forget that we have many of the past True/False films in the DBRL collection. You can view our True/False Film Fest lists that we’ve set up on our catalog.

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Pie Pie Love

DBRL Next - January 22, 2014

Eat Pie, photo by Todd Lapin via FlickrDo you love pie?  Most everyone does, and in my family there is a deep vein of love for it. When my oldest son was very young, we regularly visited my mother out in the Maryland countryside. Being a chef, recipe columnist and cookbook writer, she has tons of cookbooks. At the age of 2, my son pulled “Martha Stewart’s Pies and Tarts” off a low bookshelf at her house and started leafing through it, totally absorbed by all the sumptuous photos of scrumptious pies presented therein. It became his favorite picture book, and for the next year or so, every time we visited “Banana” he would go directly to the bookcase, extract it from the shelf and sit to feast his eyes.

Peanut Butter Pie, photo by Stefani via FlickrMy youngest son’s first sentence was “Mo’ pie,” as in “More pie.” He was sitting in his booster seat at my sister’s kitchen table. We (my extended family and I) were enjoying a homemade pecan pie, and he had just finished his first ever piece of this divine concoction. I could tell he was enjoying it, and through his eyes I saw the gears turning in his mind – he was formulating something.  Then, with effort, he let that two word sentence fly. We all busted out laughing, which delighted him, and then I gave him another sliver, which delighted him even more.

I am pleased to inform you that January 23 is National Pie Day.  Now, you don’t really need an excuse to tuck a sweet or savory filling between buttery layers of crust that flake up with baking, but if your culinary life has been deprived lately of this comforting treat, why not take the time now and celebrate this pie-designated day. What about an earthy and filling chicken pot pie for dinner and then a refined and decadent chocolate chess pie, dolloped with whipped cream, for dessert? There is no shortage of options - here’s proof. If you are gluten intolerant, as I am, you can still enjoy pie because there are lots of recipes for gluten-free crusts roaming around out there. It’s cold outside! Turn that oven on; make and bake a pie. You’ll warm your home, then your belly and finally your heart.

Photos used under the Creative Commons License.

The post Pie Pie Love appeared first on DBRL Next.

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February 7 Deadline for March SAT Exam

DBRLTeen - January 22, 2014

Standardized TestThe registration deadline for the March 8 SAT exam is Friday, February 7. Sign-up online.

If you would like to know more about testing locations, exam costs and fee waivers, please visit our  online guide to SAT/ACT preparation. The library also has a wide selection of printed ACT and SAT test guides for you to borrow.

Our most popular resource for test-takers, though, is LearningExpress Library. Through this website, you may take free online practice tests for the ACT or SAT exam. To access LearningExpress Library, you will need to login using your DBRL library card number. Your PIN is your birthdate (MMDDYYYY).  If you have questions or encounter difficulties logging in, please call  (800) 324-4806.

Finally, don’t forget to subscribe to our blog updates for regular reminders of upcoming test registration deadlines!

Originally published at February 7 Deadline for March SAT Exam.

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The Gentleman Recommends: Susanna Clarke

Next Book Buzz - January 20, 2014

Book cover for Jonathan Strange & Mr. Norrell by Susanna ClarkeIf what we read is awesome enough it will contribute to who we are. “Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell” is exceedingly awesome and about magic and magicians and an era when gentlemen were commonplace. So it will not surprise the reader to learn of my affinity for the novel and that I was both drawn to it by what I already was and shaped by it into what I currently am: a wearer of tophats and caster of the occasional spell. One cannot spend 850 often breathtaking pages in the company of gentlemen and gentlewomen without absorbing their delightful (and, increasingly in my view, mandatory) manners. The book’s influence extended beyond making suits and kerchiefs compulsory and replacing ibuprofen with laudanum as the tonic for headaches and chills*; it also provided much of the origin for my immense fear of faeries.

Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell” is overflowing with ideas. There are footnotes throughout relaying stories other writers would have been thrilled to settle on for the course of a book but that Susanna Clarke uses as spice to deepen the flavor of a work so savory and rich that if it were food it would be impolite to serve to the book’s characters and their stiff English palates without stern warnings of its decidedly un-pudding like flavors.

Clarke created a history so persuasive that one is given to wonder if she did not simply unearth England’s true history and that the country was shaped by magic, both literally in the sense of magically altered coastlines, and figuratively in the sense of magicians aiding them in their wars and inspiring their limericks. She tells, with a voice made to illicit chuckles and wry appreciative nods, the story of the titular magicians and their plight to reassert magic to its lofty and rightful heights. At the book’s onset magic is studied by a society of gentleman but never performed as they are unable. Soon Mr Norrell emerges,** desiring to disband the “theoretical magicians” and succeeding by showing that magic can be done. His spell provides the first of hundreds of the book’s mind-searing images: he causes the statues of a great church to come alive for a short while. Magic begins its ascent in esteem. Jonathan Strange, a career-less young man, accidentally discovers his aptitude for it. The two magicians join forces. Mr Norrell brings a young woman back to life with the aid of a faerie.*** The faerie, referred to only as “the man with the thistle-down hair,” has rather disagreeable terms. In addition to taking one of Lady Pole’s fingers, he bargains for domain over half her life. Mr Norrell accepts the terms, foolishly believing the faerie will take the last half of the lady’s life. Instead the resurrected finds her nights occupied by a perpetual ball taking place in the eerie bone-strewn semi-ruins of the faerie’s castle, a place called Lost-Hope. Lady Pole and her butler, Stephen Black, to whom the faerie has taken an unfortunate liking, find when trying to speak of their predicament and thereby exercise themselves from it they can only relate arcane bits of faerie history.

The novel builds to a climax worthy of its bulk. Readers will be sad to leave it and find themselves tempted to summon a faerie that might enchant them into the book’s pages permanently. Take heed though – a reread is a better idea; unlike a faerie’s bargain it won’t leave you missing a digit and with your house, which you can never leave, made from  the pages of a novel. Great novel though it may be, weather will not do it any favors.

____________________

*Also contributed to my fondness for footnotes.

**Figuratively. Norrell much prefers to remain cloistered in his library where he’s hoarded every book of magic, thereby effectively preventing anyone from practicing.

***A creature he detests but needs for such lofty magic.

The post The Gentleman Recommends: Susanna Clarke appeared first on DBRL Next.

Categories: Book Buzz
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