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New DVD: “The Punk Singer”

Center Aisle Cinema - April 28, 2014

thepunksinger

We recently added “The Punk Singer” to the DBRL collection. The film was shown earlier this year at Ragtag Cinema and currently has a rating of 83% from critics at Rotten Tomatoes. Here’s a synopsis from our catalog:

A look at the life of activist, musician, and cultural icon Kathleen Hanna, who formed the punk band Bikini Kill and pioneered the “riot grrrl” movement of the 1990s.

Check out the film trailer or the official film site for more info.

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Poetry for People Who Don’t Read Poetry

Next Book Buzz - April 28, 2014

Book cover for The Trouble With Poetry by Billy Collins“I don’t get poetry.”

Somewhere along our educational paths, some of us became convinced that poetry, by definition, must be hard, esoteric, incomprehensible. Others believe poetry is boring, the word conjuring up memories of a too-warm classroom and a lecture about syllables and iambic pentameter. If you believe you are not a poetry person, in honor of the last few days of National Poetry Month, I’m going to attempt to convince you otherwise.

Exhibit A: Billy Collins
Collins’ poetry is conversational, approachable and often gently humorous. He writes about love, loss, growing older, teenagers, camp lanyards, his kitchen and a whole host of other everyday topics, using elegant phrasing, surprising images and even wit to make what is common seem new.

Exhibit B: Mary Oliver
Oliver’s most recent collection of poems is all about the dogs she has owned. The verses in “Dog Songs” are unashamedly celebratory, as is much of her work. Nature is often the subject of her writing, and while not overtly religious, there is a quality of thanksgiving in her poems, an open wonder at the world and gratitude for her place in it. 

Exhibit C: Sharon Olds
There is a sharpness to Olds, and even a harshness at times, like she is shining a bright spotlight on her subjects. She writes fearlessly about death, sexuality, brutality and makes even the hardest truths beautiful through words and images.

What other poets would you recommend to reluctant poetry readers?

The post Poetry for People Who Don’t Read Poetry appeared first on DBRL Next.

Categories: Book Buzz

Poetry for People Who Don’t Read Poetry

DBRL Next - April 28, 2014

Book cover for The Trouble With Poetry by Billy Collins“I don’t get poetry.”

Somewhere along our educational paths, some of us became convinced that poetry, by definition, must be hard, esoteric, incomprehensible. Others believe poetry is boring, the word conjuring up memories of a too-warm classroom and a lecture about syllables and iambic pentameter. If you believe you are not a poetry person, in honor of the last few days of National Poetry Month, I’m going to attempt to convince you otherwise.

Exhibit A: Billy Collins
Collins’ poetry is conversational, approachable and often gently humorous. He writes about love, loss, growing older, teenagers, camp lanyards, his kitchen and a whole host of other everyday topics, using elegant phrasing, surprising images and even wit to make what is common seem new.

Exhibit B: Mary Oliver
Oliver’s most recent collection of poems is all about the dogs she has owned. The verses in “Dog Songs” are unashamedly celebratory, as is much of her work. Nature is often the subject of her writing, and while not overtly religious, there is a quality of thanksgiving in her poems, an open wonder at the world and gratitude for her place in it. 

Exhibit C: Sharon Olds
There is a sharpness to Olds, and even a harshness at times, like she is shining a bright spotlight on her subjects. She writes fearlessly about death, sexuality, brutality and makes even the hardest truths beautiful through words and images.

What other poets would you recommend to reluctant poetry readers?

The post Poetry for People Who Don’t Read Poetry appeared first on DBRL Next.

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Program Preview: Teen Game Night in Ashland

DBRLTeen - April 28, 2014

Super Mario BrosTeen Game Night
Friday, May 2  › 6:30-8:30 p.m.
Southern Boone County Public Library

Challenge your friends to a game on our Wii U console or to a board game tournament. We’ll have various games available as well as supplies for art projects. Refreshments provided. (Please enter through back door.)

Originally published at Program Preview: Teen Game Night in Ashland.

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Top Ten Books Librarians Love: The May List

Next Book Buzz - April 25, 2014

Library Reads logoThe days are getting warmer and longer, and summer reading is on the horizon! Here is the monthly list from LibraryReads, highlighting forthcoming titles librarians across the country recommend, including family dramas, suspense, literary fiction, and a memoir. Get ready to pack your beach bag with some great new books.

Book cover for We Were Liars by E. LockhartWe Were Liars
by E. Lockhart
“This brilliant and heartbreaking novel tells the story of a prestigious family living on a private island off the coast of Massachusetts. Full of love, lies, secrets, no shortage of family dysfunction and a shocking twist that you won’t see coming. Though this book is written for teens, it shouldn’t be overlooked by anyone looking for a fantastic read.”
- Susan Balla, Fairfield Public Library, Fairfield, CT

Book cover for All the Light We Cannot See All the Light We Cannot See
by Anthony Doerr
“Set during World War II Europe, this novel is sobering without being sentimental. The tension builds as the alternating, parallel stories of Werner and Marie-Laure unfold, and their paths cross. I highly recommend this beautiful and compelling story.”
- Kelly Currie, Delphi Public Library, Delphi, IN

Book cover for The Bees by Laline PaullThe Bees: A Novel
by Laline Paull
“This book is set entirely in a beehive, but the novel and its characters are so beautifully rendered that it could have been set anywhere. Societal codes and social mores combine with the ancient behavior rituals of bees, bringing forth a remarkable story that is sure to be a book club favorite.”
- Ilene Lefkowitz, Denville Public Library, Denville, NJ

Here is the rest of the list, with links to the library’s catalog so you can place holds on these on-order books!

The post Top Ten Books Librarians Love: The May List appeared first on DBRL Next.

Categories: Book Buzz

Top Ten Books Librarians Love: The May List

DBRL Next - April 25, 2014

Library Reads logoThe days are getting warmer and longer, and summer reading is on the horizon! Here is the monthly list from LibraryReads, highlighting forthcoming titles librarians across the country recommend, including family dramas, suspense, literary fiction, and a memoir. Get ready to pack your beach bag with some great new books.

Book cover for We Were Liars by E. LockhartWe Were Liars
by E. Lockhart
“This brilliant and heartbreaking novel tells the story of a prestigious family living on a private island off the coast of Massachusetts. Full of love, lies, secrets, no shortage of family dysfunction and a shocking twist that you won’t see coming. Though this book is written for teens, it shouldn’t be overlooked by anyone looking for a fantastic read.”
- Susan Balla, Fairfield Public Library, Fairfield, CT

Book cover for All the Light We Cannot See All the Light We Cannot See
by Anthony Doerr
“Set during World War II Europe, this novel is sobering without being sentimental. The tension builds as the alternating, parallel stories of Werner and Marie-Laure unfold, and their paths cross. I highly recommend this beautiful and compelling story.”
- Kelly Currie, Delphi Public Library, Delphi, IN

Book cover for The Bees by Laline PaullThe Bees: A Novel
by Laline Paull
“This book is set entirely in a beehive, but the novel and its characters are so beautifully rendered that it could have been set anywhere. Societal codes and social mores combine with the ancient behavior rituals of bees, bringing forth a remarkable story that is sure to be a book club favorite.”
- Ilene Lefkowitz, Denville Public Library, Denville, NJ

Here is the rest of the list, with links to the library’s catalog so you can place holds on these on-order books!

The post Top Ten Books Librarians Love: The May List appeared first on DBRL Next.

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Free Teen Life Skills Class

DBRLTeen - April 25, 2014

Rainbow House will be hosting a weekly life skills class for teens every Tuesday in May and June. Classes will be held at the Wilkes Boulevard United Methodist Church in Columbia and begin at 6:00 p.m. Each session will cover a range of skills from balancing a checkbook to changing a flat tire. This class is free and open to any young adult ages 16-22. For more information, please contact Claire Slama at (573) 474-6600, ext. 3203.

In the meantime, the library has many helpful resources for young adults preparing to set out on their own. Below is just a sampling of the titles available for check-out. All you need is a library card!

Originally published at Free Teen Life Skills Class.

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Docs Around Town: Apr. 25 – May 1

Center Aisle Cinema - April 24, 2014

noplaceonearth

April 27: “A Girl Like Her” 2:00 p.m. at Columbia Public Library, free. (via)
April 27: No Place on Earth” 1:00 p.m. at Ragtag, free. (via)

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“The World Before Her” on May 21st

Center Aisle Cinema - April 23, 2014

worldbeforeher

Wednesday, May 21, 2014 • 6:30 p.m.
Columbia Public Library, Friends Room

The World Before Her” (60 min.) is a tale of two Indias. In one, Ruhi Singh is a small-town girl competing in Bombay to win the Miss India pageant. In the other India, Prachi Trivedi is the young, militant leader of a fundamentalist Hindu camp for girls, where she preaches violent resistance to Western culture. Moving between these divergent realities, this film by Nisha Pahuja creates a lively, provocative portrait of the world’s largest democracy at a critical transitional moment—and of two women who hope to shape its future. The film played at the Citizen Jane Film Festival in 2012. The screening is a collaboration with POV, PBS’ award-winning nonfiction film series.

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Questions from “Herman’s House”

Center Aisle Cinema - April 23, 2014

hermanshouse

Thanks to everyone who came to the “Herman’s House” showing at the Columbia Public Library. Here are some questions about the film that you can respond to in the comments section of this blog post:

  1. Is prolonged solitary confinement “cruel and unusual”? Why or why not?
  2. What did you learn from the film about the ways that art and/or architecture can be used to address social justice issues or inspire change?
  3. Do you think re-designing Wallace’s cell would have impact on his well-being, and if so, how? If not, what other factors might contribute to an inmate’s well-being?
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Stream Free Music, Movies & Books From Your Library

Teen Book Buzz - April 23, 2014

Hoopla- Stream free movies, music and audiobooksWith our new digital service, Hoopla, you can watch videos or listen to music and audiobooks with your computer or mobile device for free. Hoopla allows us to add music, movies and TV to our digital offerings for the first time. Plus, you’ll never have to wait on any item through Hoopla because more than one person can access the same movie, album or audiobook at the same time.

Download the free Hoopla mobile app on your Android or iOS device to begin enjoying thousands of titles from major film studios, recording companies and publishers. Hoopla items can also stream to your computer through your Web browser.

  • You will be allowed to borrow 10 titles each month.
  • Movies & TV shows lend for 72 hours.
  • Music lends for 7 days.
  • Audiobooks lend for 21 days.
  • Content begins streaming immediately. You can also download most titles to devices for offline viewing or listening.
  • Once you borrow a title on one device it is automatically available via all devices with the Hoopla app or, on your computer, through your browser (Internet Explorer 8+, Firefox 12+, Safari 5+, Chrome 19+).
  • View or listen to the borrowed content as often as you want during the check-out period.

To use this free service, you need to have a current Daniel Boone Regional Library card. Don’t have one? Learn more at www.dbrl.org/librarycard.

Originally published at Stream Free Music, Movies & Books From Your Library.

Categories: Book Buzz

Stream Free Music, Movies & Books From Your Library

DBRLTeen - April 23, 2014

Hoopla- Stream free movies, music and audiobooksWith our new digital service, Hoopla, you can watch videos or listen to music and audiobooks with your computer or mobile device for free. Hoopla allows us to add music, movies and TV to our digital offerings for the first time. Plus, you’ll never have to wait on any item through Hoopla because more than one person can access the same movie, album or audiobook at the same time.

Download the free Hoopla mobile app on your Android or iOS device to begin enjoying thousands of titles from major film studios, recording companies and publishers. Hoopla items can also stream to your computer through your Web browser.

  • You will be allowed to borrow 10 titles each month.
  • Movies & TV shows lend for 72 hours.
  • Music lends for 7 days.
  • Audiobooks lend for 21 days.
  • Content begins streaming immediately. You can also download most titles to devices for offline viewing or listening.
  • Once you borrow a title on one device it is automatically available via all devices with the Hoopla app or, on your computer, through your browser (Internet Explorer 8+, Firefox 12+, Safari 5+, Chrome 19+).
  • View or listen to the borrowed content as often as you want during the check-out period.

To use this free service, you need to have a current Daniel Boone Regional Library card. Don’t have one? Learn more at www.dbrl.org/librarycard.

Originally published at Stream Free Music, Movies & Books From Your Library.

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Being Puppy Prepared

DBRL Next - April 23, 2014

Photo of the author's dog, ZarraI’ve had family dogs, where the responsibility of training, walking and caring for the animal was shared among four people, but Zarra, my red heeler, is the first dog I can completely call my own.  She’s spastic, energetic and, as her name implies, bizarre. When I first adopted her, I thought my previous experience raising dogs would be enough to reign in her crazy, but after a few months her behavior immediately alerted me that I was very, horrifyingly, wrong.

I constantly struggle to stop her from violently shaking her leash in an excited fit, and although I love the sound of her beautiful voice, her infatuation with barking is infuriating.

On the bright side, she is wicked smart, has more personality than three dogs combined and is the perfect snuggle companion when she’s not attempting to thrust me from the bed with tiny outstretched legs.

All this hassle led me to a moment of brilliance where I thought, why, I work at a library, don’t I? We have a dog training collection, don’t we? Then why don’t I check myself out some much-needed books that will enlighten me on how to reign in my fiendish friend?

And that’s what I’m here to tell you, all of you pessimistic people out there thinking of getting yourself a puppy this summer, or even adopting a dog from Second Chance. Make sure you properly equip yourself to handle your rowdy pup, and be sure to do it while they are still malleable little innocent beings unlike my red furred friend.

 Okay, I want a dog. Where do I start?

Book cover for Choosing the Dog That's Right for YouChoosing the Dog That’s Right for You” by Sam Stall

“Choosing the Dog That’s Right for You” goes over every canine breed and their individual quirks. At first, the type of breed you’re thinking of adopting might not seem important past looks, but trust me, it’s very important. This book covers factors you probably weren’t even considering, like known health issues and activity needs. Stall covers everything you’ll need to know from the amount of time you’ll spend caring for a Yorkshire Terrier’s hair, to the awful watch-dog ability of the overly friendly Huskie, to the loud and overactive personality of the Jack Russell Terrier.

Okay, I got my dog, What now?

Book cover for Good Dog, the Easy way to Train Your DogGood Dog! The Easy Way to Train your Dog” by Sarah Whitehead

This is a quick and easy-to-use book packed full of useful pictures and one-page training guides. I flipped through it multiple times, using the images to remind myself of the step-by-step process of whatever training technique I was currently working on. The pictures are extremely helpful, and it covers a wide range of tricks from the simple sit to the complex rollover.

 I want more training!

Book cover for Love That Dog Training ProgramThe Love That Dog Training Program” by Dawn Sylvia-Stasiewicz

Where “Good Dog!” is simple, “The Love That Dog Training Program” is detailed, thorough and complex. Sylvia-Stasiewicz sets up a day-by-day training schedule for you to follow over a five week-long course. Although I didn’t apply the Sylvia-Stasiewicz program, I do wish I’d had the opportunity when I first got Zarra. Instead, I found myself flipping through this book and using its troubleshooting section in an attempt to fix my dog’s behavioral problems while implementing its cookie sit and stay training techniques.

 More! More! More!

Columbia Public Library has over three shelves of books on dog training, and I highly recommend coming in and checking them out whether you have a troublesome pup on your hands or are thinking about getting yourself one.

Good luck! Be patient!

The post Being Puppy Prepared appeared first on DBRL Next.

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“A Girl Like Her” on April 27th

Center Aisle Cinema - April 21, 2014
agirllikeher Sunday, April 27 › 2-3:30 p.m. Columbia Public Library, Friends Room

Join us for a special showing of “A Girl Like Her” (48 min.) at Columbia Public Library. The film will be followed by a panel discussion including an adoptive parent, an adoptee, birth parents involved with an open and closed adoption and a social worker. Co-sponsored by the Adoption Triad Connection of Mid-Missouri.  Here’s a synopsis from the film webpage:

A GIRL LIKE HER reveals the hidden history of over a million young women who became pregnant in the 1950s and 60s and were banished to maternity homes to give birth, surrender their children, and return home alone. They were told to keep their secret, move on and forget. But, does a woman forget her child? The film combines footage from educational films and newsreels of the time period about dating, sex, “illegitimate” pregnancy, and adoption—that both reflected and shaped the public’s understanding of single pregnancy during that time—with the voices of these mothers as they speak today, with hindsight, about the long-term impact of surrender and silence on their lives.

This documentary written and directed by Ann Fessler, author of “The Girls Who Went Away.” While this film is not part of the monthly Center Aisle Cinema series, we’d still encourage you to attend.

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The Gentleman Recommends: Flann O’Brien

DBRL Next - April 21, 2014

Book cover for The Third Policeman by Flann O'BrienThe most important thing I can tell you about Flann O’Brien is: you should not read the introduction to “The Complete Novels” until after you’ve read the complete novels. Perhaps the introducer believed he was writing an afterword, or perhaps he believes he lives in a surreal utopia where everyone has read Flann O’Brien. Regardless, he drops spoilers like race cars during a bolt shortage, including a huge one that will change the way you read “The Third Policeman.” Fortunately, I long ago developed a suspicion of introductions and always save them for last, so it was with a self-satisfied smirk, wagged finger of admonishment and chest-puffed entreaty of “don’t be a monster that spoils stuff” that I greeted the introducer’s ghastly act of revealing the end of the “The Third Policeman,” where the reader should discover for themselves that [spoiler removed by editor].

Flann O’Brien, much like Batman or a rapper, has more than one name. His realest name is Brian O’Nolan, and, in addition to Flann, he also wrote as Myles na gCopaleen, which I presume is the result of several typos and an urge to be the most inscrutable superhero ever. Unlike my previous recommendations whose recommending came at least partially in the service of bribing them to be my friends, any relationship with O’Brien would be awkward and one-sided as the man died on April Fools’ Day in 1966. (Which, if one has to die, must be the best day to do so. Think of the incredulous responses when his friends and loved ones were notified!)

“The Third Policeman” begins with the narrator confessing to murder. From there it is a whirlwind consisting of a plot to obtain the deceased’s fortune; asides concerning the ludicrous theories of the philosopher de Selby (whom the narrator is obsessed with and had been planning to write a book on), such as his belief that night is an illusion caused by an accretion of black gases, that the earth is sausage-shaped and that with a large enough series of mirrors one is capable of seeing into the past; and absurd policemen whose fixations on bicycles, high-fallutin’ rhetoric and incomprehensible mathematics provide much of the fuel for this spectacular comedy.

There’s also some spectacular horror. In addition to murder, there is a conversation with a ghost, a journey into a surreal landscape where a police station looks two-dimensional, as if “it was painted on the sky,” an alliance with an army of one-legged men, some incomprehensible mathematics and a bicycle painted a color that drives anyone who sees it mad. There’s a chest of drawers so flawless that the only thing the policeman found worthy of putting in it was a smaller replica, which presented the same problem, which meant it must contain a smaller replica and so on until there’s a chest so small it can’t be spotted with a magnifying glass. This is a rare book that is creepy, hilarious and uncanny within the same sentence. Also, the ending is neat.

The post The Gentleman Recommends: Flann O’Brien appeared first on DBRL Next.

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The Gentleman Recommends: Flann O’Brien

Next Book Buzz - April 21, 2014

Book cover for The Third Policeman by Flann O'BrienThe most important thing I can tell you about Flann O’Brien is: you should not read the introduction to “The Complete Novels” until after you’ve read the complete novels. Perhaps the introducer believed he was writing an afterword, or perhaps he believes he lives in a surreal utopia where everyone has read Flann O’Brien. Regardless, he drops spoilers like race cars during a bolt shortage, including a huge one that will change the way you read “The Third Policeman.” Fortunately, I long ago developed a suspicion of introductions and always save them for last, so it was with a self-satisfied smirk, wagged finger of admonishment and chest-puffed entreaty of “don’t be a monster that spoils stuff” that I greeted the introducer’s ghastly act of revealing the end of the “The Third Policeman,” where the reader should discover for themselves that [spoiler removed by editor].

Flann O’Brien, much like Batman or a rapper, has more than one name. His realest name is Brian O’Nolan, and, in addition to Flann, he also wrote as Myles na gCopaleen, which I presume is the result of several typos and an urge to be the most inscrutable superhero ever. Unlike my previous recommendations whose recommending came at least partially in the service of bribing them to be my friends, any relationship with O’Brien would be awkward and one-sided as the man died on April Fools’ Day in 1966. (Which, if one has to die, must be the best day to do so. Think of the incredulous responses when his friends and loved ones were notified!)

“The Third Policeman” begins with the narrator confessing to murder. From there it is a whirlwind consisting of a plot to obtain the deceased’s fortune; asides concerning the ludicrous theories of the philosopher de Selby (whom the narrator is obsessed with and had been planning to write a book on), such as his belief that night is an illusion caused by an accretion of black gases, that the earth is sausage-shaped and that with a large enough series of mirrors one is capable of seeing into the past; and absurd policemen whose fixations on bicycles, high-fallutin’ rhetoric and incomprehensible mathematics provide much of the fuel for this spectacular comedy.

There’s also some spectacular horror. In addition to murder, there is a conversation with a ghost, a journey into a surreal landscape where a police station looks two-dimensional, as if “it was painted on the sky,” an alliance with an army of one-legged men, some incomprehensible mathematics and a bicycle painted a color that drives anyone who sees it mad. There’s a chest of drawers so flawless that the only thing the policeman found worthy of putting in it was a smaller replica, which presented the same problem, which meant it must contain a smaller replica and so on until there’s a chest so small it can’t be spotted with a magnifying glass. This is a rare book that is creepy, hilarious and uncanny within the same sentence. Also, the ending is neat.

The post The Gentleman Recommends: Flann O’Brien appeared first on DBRL Next.

Categories: Book Buzz

Staff Review: The Moon and More by Sarah Dessen

DBRLTeen - April 21, 2014

The Moon and More by Sarah DessenEmaline has just graduated from high school and she is facing some very important decisions. Is it important to go to an Ivy League university, or is an in-state college acceptable? Does she want to be in a committed, long-term relationship, or is she looking for a summer fling? Does she want to continue to have contact with her biological father, or is it worth the emotional investment? Emaline is trying to find her way while dealing with two step-sisters, a half-brother, her mother, her grandmother, her adopted dad, her summer job and assorted friends.

Why I liked it: The characters are believable. Emaline’s family has its share of sibling rivalry, but also love and support. Emaline has to do some hard thinking about what is right for her, not just accepting what other people think she should do.

Three words to describe the book: Humorous, realistic, thought-provoking.

Other books by Sarah Dessen:What Happened to Goodbye,” “Along for the Ride,” “Lock and Key,” “Just Listen,” “The Truth About Forever” and “Keeping the Moon.”

Originally published at Staff Review: The Moon and More by Sarah Dessen.

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Earth Day Approaches

DBRL Next - April 18, 2014

Are you ready to celebrate your momma? Don’t worry, Mother’s Day isn’t for another month, but you can celebrate your earth mother on April 22! Jefferson City celebrates Earth Day 2014 on Friday, April 25, and Columbia will hold its downtown Earth Day celebration the following Sunday (April 27th).  Until then, here are some books to get you in the Earth Day spirit.

Read a novel about our planet (fictional books):

  • Book cover for Flight Behavior by Barbara KingsolverFlight Behavior” by Barbara Kingsolver. A story of a woman and her family living in modern-day Appalachia, which discusses the intersection of rural poverty and the environment. Kingsolver has written many other books regarding the environment, including an account of her family living solely off food they and their neighbors grew for an entire year!
  • Ishmael” by Daniel Quinn. The novel begins with this newspaper advertisement: “TEACHER seeks pupil. Must have an earnest desire to save the world. Apply in person.” This philosophical work employs a monkey teacher and his human student to examine mythology’s effect on ethics and how it relates to sustainability.
  • Arctic Rising” by Tobias S. Buckell. In this futuristic tale, the arctic ice cap has almost completely melted, and militaries and corporations are racing to claim the newly exposed ocean oil.

Educate yourself on environmental issues (nonfiction books):

  • Book cover for Mycelium Running by Paul StametsMycelium Running” by Paul Staments. Learn about the mysterious world of mushrooms and how they can help save the world! Staments has discovered a way to use mushrooms’ microscopic mycelium to decompose toxic waste, reduce pathogens from agricultural watersheds, control insect populations and generally promote the health of our forests.
  • The Upcycle” by William McDonough. It’s rare to read a book that is optimistic about humanity’s future on earth, but according to this book we can save the health of our planet by taking a different approach to the way we live on it. Author William McDonough believes our ecological crisis is fundamentally a design problem and that we can (and must) create products that are designed to leave a positive impact on the environment instead of a negative or even a ‘zero impact.’
  • The Sixth Extinction” by Elizabeth Kolbert. Guess which species the title refers to? Yep, it’s us, womp womp. Earth has hosted five major extinctions over the past half a billion years, all of which caused the number of species on the planet to greatly diminish. “The Sixth Extinction” uses natural history and field reporting to chronicle the extinction unfolding before us.
  • Radical Homemakers” by Shannon Hayes. This book documents a new kind of homemaker: men and women who have chosen to return to their homes and families as an ecological and political act. These individuals seek to reclaim the role of a homemaker from corporations, capitalism and patriarchy in an attempt to find empowerment and fulfillment through nurturing their families and the environment.

Now get out there and do something! (books about gardening and green living):

  • Book cover for Worms Eat My Garbage by Mary AppelhofWorms Eat My Garbage” by Mary Appelhof. Take composting to a whole new level by using worms to recycle your waste.
  • The Vegetable Gardener’s Guide to Permaculture” by Christopher Shein. Go beyond gardening and create your own sustainable food ecosystem!
  • The Backyard Homestead.” Whether you live in town or in the country, learn how to raise chickens, grow and preserve food, keep bees and much more! Be sure to check out this book or one of our many other books on the subject of homesteading.
  • Cooking Green” by Kate Heyhoe. Take steps to reduce your carbon footprint starting in the kitchen! This book discusses ways you can cook and eat that are healthier for both you and the planet.
  • The Naturally Green Home” by Karyn Siegel-Maier. Save money and the environment by learning how to use non-toxic substances to clean your house.

Happy Earth Day!

The post Earth Day Approaches appeared first on DBRL Next.

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Docs Around Town: Apr. 18 – Apr. 24

Center Aisle Cinema - April 17, 2014

hermanshouse

April 18: Tim’s Vermeer” starts at Ragtag. (via)
April 23: Elena” 4:00 p.m. at  Tate Hall, Room 215, MU campus, free. (via)
April 23:
 “Herman’s House” 6:30 p.m. at Columbia Public Library, free. (via)
April 24: Elena” 5:15 p.m. at Ragtag. (via)

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2014 Gateway & Truman Award Winners Announced

Teen Book Buzz - April 17, 2014

It turns out that our predictions for the 2014 Gateway and Truman award winners were spot-on. Veronica Roth is the recipient of this year’s Gateway Readers Award for her book, “Divergent.” In a future Chicago, Beatrice Prior must choose among five predetermined factions to define her identity for the rest of her life, a decision made more difficult when she discovers that she is an anomoly who does not fit into any one group. Runners-up for the Gateway Award were “Anna Dressed in Blood” by Kendare Blake and “Ashfall” by Mike Mullin.

Congratulations also goes to Marie Lu who is this year’s Truman Readers Award recipient for her book, “Legend.” In the dark future where North America has split into two warring nations, teenagers Day, a famous criminal, and June, a brilliant soldier hired to capture him, discover that they have a common enemy. Richard Paul Evans was the second place award winner for “Michael Vey: the Prisoner of Cell 25,” while Wendelin Van Draanen received the third place honor for “The Running Dream.”

Originally published at 2014 Gateway & Truman Award Winners Announced.

Categories: Book Buzz
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