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Bookmarks: What’s Saving Your Page?

Next Book Buzz - April 9, 2014

Bookmarks are thought to have been used since at least the end of the medieval period, but one of the first references to their use involves the presentation of a silk bookmark to Queen Elizabeth I of England (circa 1584). People use all sorts of different things as bookmarks, everything from old receipts to love letters. Lauren, one of our librarians at the Columbia Public Library, said she attended a conference where four or five librarians admitted to having found bacon in a book! How do you save your place in a book? Let us know in the comments! (And please don’t put bacon in our books.)

I have been using leftover paint chips from a project as bookmarks. This color is “Radiant Orchid.” Currently reading: “The Creative Habit” by Twyla Tharp.

1 Katie

Rob is using his car title at the moment. Currently reading: “The Exegesis of Philip K. Dick.” (Editor’s note: This was a patron’s personal book. Using important documents as bookmarks in library books is not a good idea.)

Photo of a book and bookmark

This adorable handmade creature marks Angela’s page. Currently reading: “Every Day” by David Levithan.

Photo of a book and bookmark

Barb had lots of bookmarking to do. Luckily she had plenty of these tiny post-its! Currently reading: “The Help” by Kathryn Stockett.

Photo of a book and bookmark

Althea’s beautiful bookmark. Currently reading: “Adé” by Rebecca Walker.

Photo of a book and bookmark

Brandy loves sloths so much that one of her coworkers made her this bookmark.

Photo of a book and bookmark

Rosie the Riveter never stops working, even as a bookmark! Brian is using a gallery guide from a recent trip to Crystal Bridges American Art Museum as his bookmark. Currently reading: “The Upcycle” By William McDonough.

Photo of a book and bookmark

Hilary uses her pets as bookmarks! (Or maybe they use her?) Currently reading: “Adventures in Yarn Farming” by Barbara Parry.

Photo of a cat as bookmark

Eric was using his Ha Ha Tonka concert ticket, until he found a postcard from Romania in this used textbook. Currently reading: “Interpersonal Process in Therapy” by Edward Teyber and Faith Holmes McClure.

Photo of a book and bookmark

The Warrior card from a Xultun tarot deck guards Kelsey’s spot in her book. Currently reading: “Perdido Street Station” by China Miéville.

10 Kelsey

Ida’s daughter made her this cross-stitched Hunger Games bookmark.

Hunger Games bookmark

And here’s a box of long lost bookmarks in the Columbia Public Library’s Circulation Department.
box of lost bookmarks

So, what’s in your book?

The post Bookmarks: What’s Saving Your Page? appeared first on DBRL Next.

Categories: Book Buzz

Bookmarks: What’s Saving Your Page?

DBRL Next - April 9, 2014

Bookmarks are thought to have been used since at least the end of the medieval period, but one of the first references to their use involves the presentation of a silk bookmark to Queen Elizabeth I of England (circa 1584). People use all sorts of different things as bookmarks, everything from old receipts to love letters. Lauren, one of our librarians at the Columbia Public Library, said she attended a conference where four or five librarians admitted to having found bacon in a book! How do you save your place in a book? Let us know in the comments! (And please don’t put bacon in our books.)

I have been using leftover paint chips from a project as bookmarks. This color is “Radiant Orchid.” Currently reading: “The Creative Habit” by Twyla Tharp.

1 Katie

Rob is using his car title at the moment. Currently reading: “The Exegesis of Philip K. Dick.” (Editor’s note: This was a patron’s personal book. Using important documents as bookmarks in library books is not a good idea.)

Photo of a book and bookmark

This adorable handmade creature marks Angela’s page. Currently reading: “Every Day” by David Levithan.

Photo of a book and bookmark

Barb had lots of bookmarking to do. Luckily she had plenty of these tiny post-its! Currently reading: “The Help” by Kathryn Stockett.

Photo of a book and bookmark

Althea’s beautiful bookmark. Currently reading: “Adé” by Rebecca Walker.

Photo of a book and bookmark

Brandy loves sloths so much that one of her coworkers made her this bookmark.

Photo of a book and bookmark

Rosie the Riveter never stops working, even as a bookmark! Brian is using a gallery guide from a recent trip to Crystal Bridges American Art Museum as his bookmark. Currently reading: “The Upcycle” By William McDonough.

Photo of a book and bookmark

Hilary uses her pets as bookmarks! (Or maybe they use her?) Currently reading: “Adventures in Yarn Farming” by Barbara Parry.

Photo of a cat as bookmark

Eric was using his Ha Ha Tonka concert ticket, until he found a postcard from Romania in this used textbook. Currently reading: “Interpersonal Process in Therapy” by Edward Teyber and Faith Holmes McClure.

Photo of a book and bookmark

The Warrior card from a Xultun tarot deck guards Kelsey’s spot in her book. Currently reading: “Perdido Street Station” by China Miéville.

10 Kelsey

Ida’s daughter made her this cross-stitched Hunger Games bookmark.

Hunger Games bookmark

And here’s a box of long lost bookmarks in the Columbia Public Library’s Circulation Department.
box of lost bookmarks

So, what’s in your book?

The post Bookmarks: What’s Saving Your Page? appeared first on DBRL Next.

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New DVD: “Let the Fire Burn”

Center Aisle Cinema - April 7, 2014

letthefireburn

We recently added “Let the Fire Burn” to the DBRL collection. The film played last year at various film festivals and currently has a rating of 97% from critics at Rotten Tomatoes. Here’s a synopsis from our catalog:

A found-footage film that unfurls with the tension of a great thriller. On May 13, 1985, a longtime feud between the city of Philadelphia and controversial Black Power group MOVE came to a deadly climax. By order of local authorities, police dropped military-grade explosive onto a MOVE-occupied rowhouse. TV cameras captured the conflagration that quickly escalated-and resulted in the tragic deaths of eleven people (including five children) and the destruction of 61 homes.

Check out the film trailer or the official film site for more info.

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Classics for Everyone: Emily Dickinson

Next Book Buzz - April 7, 2014

Book cover for Collected Poems of Emily DickinsonIf Emily Dickinson never came out of her room, how does everyone know about her? The answer lies in the 1,775 poems the recluse in white left behind when she died in 1886. Only a few were published during her lifetime. But thanks to the efforts of her sister, Lavinia, the world came to know Emily and her verse posthumously.

From around the age of 30 on, Dickinson limited the physical range of her world to the confines of her Amherst, Massachusetts home and a wardrobe of white dresses. But she kept a connection to society through prolific correspondence with a number of people. Many of her letters included poems; more than 100 went to the editor of the Atlantic Monthly. But editors of the day were not ready for the ways in which her poems broke with convention.

Though she lived a largely intellectual life, her poetry shows richness, depth and a grounding in concrete realities. She wrote of death heralded not with trumpets but the buzzing of a fly. She describes a snake as “the narrow fellow in the grass” and the feeling you get when you see him as “zero at the bone.” Even hope took on a physical manifestation for her: “Hope is the thing with feathers…”

Dickinson packed acres of meaning into a few square inches of paper. Most of her poems are concise, yet speak profoundly about themes such as death, time, nature, love and immortality. Her work can be found in “Collected Poems” and in the library’s LitFINDER database.

To learn more about the poet’s life, try Gordon Lyndall’s book, “Lives Like Loaded Guns.” Lyndall explores the relationships and feuds among members of the Dickinson family. The conflicts carried on long after Dickinson’s death, with struggles for control over her work and even how the story of her life would be told. Lyndall takes his title from a Dickinson poem, one which allows Emily herself to have the last word:

“My Life had stood — a Loaded Gun —
In Corners — till a Day
The Owner passed — identified —
And carried Me away.”

 

The post Classics for Everyone: Emily Dickinson appeared first on DBRL Next.

Categories: Book Buzz

Classics for Everyone: Emily Dickinson

DBRL Next - April 7, 2014

Book cover for Collected Poems of Emily DickinsonIf Emily Dickinson never came out of her room, how does everyone know about her? The answer lies in the 1,775 poems the recluse in white left behind when she died in 1886. Only a few were published during her lifetime. But thanks to the efforts of her sister, Lavinia, the world came to know Emily and her verse posthumously.

From around the age of 30 on, Dickinson limited the physical range of her world to the confines of her Amherst, Massachusetts home and a wardrobe of white dresses. But she kept a connection to society through prolific correspondence with a number of people. Many of her letters included poems; more than 100 went to the editor of the Atlantic Monthly. But editors of the day were not ready for the ways in which her poems broke with convention.

Though she lived a largely intellectual life, her poetry shows richness, depth and a grounding in concrete realities. She wrote of death heralded not with trumpets but the buzzing of a fly. She describes a snake as “the narrow fellow in the grass” and the feeling you get when you see him as “zero at the bone.” Even hope took on a physical manifestation for her: “Hope is the thing with feathers…”

Dickinson packed acres of meaning into a few square inches of paper. Most of her poems are concise, yet speak profoundly about themes such as death, time, nature, love and immortality. Her work can be found in “Collected Poems” and in the library’s LitFINDER database.

To learn more about the poet’s life, try Gordon Lyndall’s book, “Lives Like Loaded Guns.” Lyndall explores the relationships and feuds among members of the Dickinson family. The conflicts carried on long after Dickinson’s death, with struggles for control over her work and even how the story of her life would be told. Lyndall takes his title from a Dickinson poem, one which allows Emily herself to have the last word:

“My Life had stood — a Loaded Gun —
In Corners — till a Day
The Owner passed — identified —
And carried Me away.”

 

The post Classics for Everyone: Emily Dickinson appeared first on DBRL Next.

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Exploring the Missouri Immigrant Experience Through Photography and Film

DBRL Next - April 4, 2014

photo of Latino immigrants, from the Missouri Valley Special Collections, Kansas City Public LibraryMissouri’s history is rich with the contributions of immigrants from Germany, Ireland, Italy, Poland, and elsewhere. Today, as a destination for refugees and new groups of immigrants, Missouri has become home to people from Bosnia, Bhutan, Vietnam, Iraq, Somalia, Mexico and other countries, contributing to and shaping Missouri’s economy, neighborhoods and families.

Explore the Missouri immigrant experience with these programs at the Columbia Public Library.

Faces and Places Photo Exhibit
April 5 – 25
Columbia Public Library

View an exhibit of photos about the Missouri immigrant experience on the first and second floor clay brick walls. The exhibit features historical images from archival collections and a selection of photos by contemporary photographers of immigrant communities in Missouri. The exhibit is sponsored by Missouri Immigrant & Refugee Advocates with support from the Missouri Arts Council, the Missouri History Museum, the Missouri Humanities Council, the Puffin Foundation, the State Historical Society, the Regional Arts Commission of St. Louis, the City of Columbia Human Rights Commission and Welcoming Missouri.

The exhibit features contemporary works by:
Juan Montaña
Amela Sinanagic
Oscar Pedroza
Rita Chu

Photo of immigrants by a train from the YMCA Photo Collection

The Missouri Immigrant Experience Gallery Walk
Saturday, April 5 › 10 a.m.-12:30 p.m.
Columbia Public Library, Friends Room

Hear the story behind the photo exhibit with a gallery walk led by curator Danny Gonzalez of the Missouri Historical Society and some of the photographers who have told the stories of their immigrant communities through the images on display. After the walk, enjoy refreshments in the Friends Room and meet with some immigrants established and new.

“Welcome to Shelbyville” Film & Discussion
Wednesday, April 9 › 6:30-8:30 p.m.
Columbia Public Library, Friends Room

This documentary by Kim Snyder explores one community’s struggle to integrate newcomers from other countries into its rural culture, asking the question, who is American and exploring the idea of American identity. A panel discussion afterwards will include speakers from groups that help refugees and immigrants adjust to new lives here in Columbia. (Film is 50 min., rated PG.) See more at our films blog, Center Aisle Cinema.

 

The post Exploring the Missouri Immigrant Experience Through Photography and Film appeared first on DBRL Next.

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Books for Dudes – “Blackout”

DBRLTeen - April 4, 2014

Robison Wells, author of popular YA books “Variant” and “Feedback,” begins a new YA series with “Blackout.” This thriller starts with super-powered teens attacking Hoover Dam, and the action only gets bigger from there. These teen terrorist attacks are happening all over the U.S., and the devastation is pretty epic. (Hint: You don’t want to be a fictional character living in Chicago in this book.)

indexThe terrorists, however, are not the only teens with powers. Teens all over the country randomly start exhibiting powers. Jack, a former student turned janitor at his old high school, is shocked to see his entire school rounded up by the government, just as his old friend Aubrey turns invisible and escapes. Jack and Aubrey go on the run to avoid the government and try to find out why Aubrey has powers, while another perspective follows the terrorists trying to pick more damaging targets. The government blames a virus–but if so, how was it transmitted, why is it only affecting teens, and why are so many of the teens terrorists? Wells provides an interesting take on powers, and he has a flair for unexpected betrayals and bad situations becoming much worse.

If you’re a fan of X-Men or any other superhero fiction, chances are you’ll enjoy this book. Wells sets himself apart from other superhero fiction with his unusual take on traditional powers. For instance, instead of invisibility, Aubrey actually has the power to just be unnoticed by people around her. A terrorist doesn’t have complete mind control, but he can add or change memories to get what he wants. The power descriptions were as entertaining as finding out what happens next…speaking of, read this book and then join me in waiting for its sequel!

Originally published at Books for Dudes – “Blackout”.

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Docs Around Town: Apr. 4 – Apr. 10

Center Aisle Cinema - April 3, 2014

whywefight

April 9: “Welcome to Shelbyville” 6:30 p.m. at Columbia Public Library, free. (via)
April 9: Why We Fight” 7:00 p.m. at Boone County Government Center, free. (via)

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