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Reader Review: 2 A.M. at the Cat’s Pajamas

DBRL Next - August 6, 2015

Book cover for 2 am at the cats pajamas2 A.M. at the Cat’s Pajamas” follows several characters over the course of 24 hours. As the night ends they all end up at a local Jazz club called The Cats Pajamas! This is one of those books that I might have to go back and read closer to pick up things I have missed. It followed several characters in the course of a day/night and how all their lives connect. A quick read and interesting story. I am still not sure about one part of the ending, but I liked the book overall.

Three words that describe this book: charming, hope, loss

You might want to pick this book up if: If you enjoy the movie, “Love Actually,” you will like this book. If you like characters that are flawed and believable, you will like this book.

-Michelle

The post Reader Review: 2 A.M. at the Cat’s Pajamas appeared first on DBRL Next.

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Genealogy Tips, Programs and How-to Books at Your Library

DBRL Next - August 5, 2015

Book cover for Finding Your RootsNew to researching your family’s history? The Daniel Boone Regional Library is a great place to start, especially if you would like some in-person guidance. If you pick up one of our current program guides, check the index for our genealogy classes, or check the schedule online. You’ll find current programs and drop-in help sessions to make your family tree grow! Besides programs, we have two online databases we’ve previously recommended on this blog – Heritage Quest and Ancestry Library Edition. And we have a reference collection containing all kinds of local history as well as genealogy how-to books.

If your ancestors were local to this area, we have lots of great books of interest, from county and city histories and maps to extractions of marriage records and cemetery records. We also have a complete run of the Columbia Daily Tribune on microfilm at our Columbia location that you can access to get an obituary, marriage announcement or even a family reunion article.

In our circulating collection we have several how-to books you can check out and take home. Two of my favorite genealogy handbooks are: “The Source” and “The Handybook for Genealogists.” “The Source” provides excellent information about the types of records that you will find in your genealogical research of your American ancestry. Besides showing examples of these documents, the back of the book is loaded with names of libraries, archives and repositories that hold all kinds of records you might use to document the lives of your ancestors! “The Handybook for Genealogists” is a great guide that will help you learn about the various counties, their boundaries and when their records begin and how to access them. A whole section on maps – including migration patterns, trails and boundary lines – is also a part of this great reference book.

If you like to do your research online, or if you need to find documents and records from other states, see our genealogy subject guide – it has links to beginners’ guides, sources for vital records, cemetery records, immigration records and more.

So whether you want to come browse our reference collection and check out some how-to books or learn about online resources, we’ve got you covered! Who knows, maybe you will find the hero in your family tree!

The post Genealogy Tips, Programs and How-to Books at Your Library appeared first on DBRL Next.

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Flash Fiction Contest: After the End

One Read - August 4, 2015

“Everything ends. I am not afraid.” – Emily St. John Mandel, “Station Eleven”

Great minds only need simple tools by Antti KyllonenIn this year’s One READ selection, a famous actor dies of a heart attack on stage during a production of King Lear, and hours later, life as we know it begins to unwind. A flu pandemic eliminates 95% of the population and the survivors, 20 years later, navigate a world without electricity, transportation or medicine.

Taking inspiration from “Station Eleven,” we invite you to tell a story about a world’s end in 250 words or less. This world can be small and personal, like one’s family or home, or more literal, like a country or planet. Give us an ending — and what comes after.

Starting September 1, entries may be submitted using this form, mailed or dropped off at any library or bookmobile. (See full rules below for details.) Winning entries and honorable mentions will be published on this site and winners will receive a $20 book store gift card.

Entries are due by September 23. Participants must be age 16 or older and residents of Boone or Callaway Counties. Read on for complete contest rules.

Contest Rules Eligibility
  • The contest is open to those 16 years of age and older.
  • Participants must reside within the DBRL service area (Boone or Callaway County, Missouri).
Contest Deadline
  • Entries will be accepted through September 23, 2015. (Mailed entries must be postmarked by that date.)
Submission Requirements and Guidelines
  • One entry per individual.
  • Submissions must be 250 words or less in length.
  • Submissions must be in English.
  • Submissions must include writer’s name, age, address and email address or phone number for eligibility verification and contact purposes.
  • Entries must be in text format and typed.
  • Entries may be submitted through the online form or by mail (DBRL, ATTN: Judy/One Read Writing Contest, PO Box 1267, Columbia, MO 65205), or dropped off at a DBRL location.
  • Submissions must be original, unpublished works.
  • Each participant must be the sole author and exclusive owner of all right, title and interest in and to his or her submission.
  • DBRL’s publication and use of the submission in accordance with the terms set out herein will not infringe or violate the rights of any third party (including copyright), or require any payment to or consent/permission from any third party.
Content Restrictions
  • The submission must not contain any material that is inappropriate, indecent, profane, obscene, hateful, tortious, defamatory, slanderous or libelous.
  • The submission must not contain any material that promotes bigotry, racism, hatred or harm against any group or individual or promotes discrimination based on race, gender, religion, nationality, disability, sexual orientation or age.
  • The submission must not contain any material that is unlawful, in violation of or contrary to the laws or regulations in any jurisdiction where the submission is created.
  • The submission must not contain any commercial content that promotes any product or service of the sponsor or any third party.
Judging
  • Entries will be evaluated and the winners chosen based on creativity, grammar and emotion evoked by the writing, as well as adherence to the guidelines outlined above.
  • Two winners will be announced by October 12.
  • Winning entries and those receiving honorable mentions will appear on the One Read website.
  • Winners will be notified by phone or email and will each receive a $20 bookstore gift certificate.

 

The post Flash Fiction Contest: After the End appeared first on One READ.

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Reader Review: Still Life

DBRL Next - August 4, 2015

Book cover for Still Life by Louise PennyStill Life” by Louise Penny introduces Chief Inspector Gamache. There is a death in the small rural village of Three Pines near Montreal in Canada. Chief Inspector Gamache is called in to investigate what was originally thought to be a hunting accident resulting in the death of an elderly school teacher who was loved by all of the villagers. The plot unfolds to actually be a murder investigation with many twists and turns. The key appears to be in the painting done by the victim, and Inspector Gamache has to figure it out.

Three words that describe this book: Intriguing, captivating, interesting.

You might want to pick this book up if: You enjoy mysteries and like to try to figure it out as you read!

-Linda

The post Reader Review: Still Life appeared first on DBRL Next.

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Heavy Medal: Mock Newbery Awards

DBRLTeen - August 4, 2015

Mock Newbery Award
The Newbery Medal is awarded each year to “the author of the most distinguished contribution to American literature for children.” The Newbery Medal is to children’s literature what the Oscar is to the Academy Awards. In plain English: This award is given to the best chapter book of the year. Some popular Newbery award-winning titles include “The One and Only Ivan” by Katherine Applegate, “The Giver” by Lois Lowry and “The Graveyard Book” by Neil Gaiman.

About our Mock Newbery Program:

Throughout the fall, we are inviting youth in grades 4-8 to join us twice per month to discuss this year’s Newbery finalists. Library staff will facilitate the sessions along with Nancy Baumann, a local educator and previous Newbery committee member. This is the fourth year that the library has offered this unique book club opportunity and we hope that you will consider signing up.

How to get involved:

Sessions will be held from 4:30-5:30 p.m. at the Columbia Public Library on the following Wednesdays: September 9 and 23, October 7 and 21, November 4 and 18 and December 2 and 16. Registration begins Tuesday, September 1. To sign-up, please call (573) 443-3161.

This year’s books:

Wondering what books we’ll be discussing this year? See the list below!

Originally published at Heavy Medal: Mock Newbery Awards.

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Seventh Summer Reading Gift Card Winner!

DBRL Next - August 3, 2015

TrophyCongratulations to Monielle, a Fulton patron, for winning our seventh Adult Summer Reading prize drawing of the summer. She is the recipient of a $25 gift card from Well Read books.

We have just two more drawings left this summer, so keep your fingers crossed. You can still submit book reviews  to increase your chances of winning.

The post Seventh Summer Reading Gift Card Winner! appeared first on DBRL Next.

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Tech for Teachers, Free @ DBRL

DBRL Next - July 31, 2015

My librarian pal Hilary and I just had the pleasure of presenting to groups of area teachers, letting them know all about the free online learning tools for the kids they teach, as well as for their own professional development. The boatload of incredible information available to you if you have a library card and Internet access is pretty amazing. Here is just a handful of the online tools you should be using.

Lynda.com logoEducation and Elearning tools from Lynda.com
Want to take a course in deploying 1:1 iPads in the classroom? How about project-based learning or flipped classrooms? Need to get up to speed on a certain software, like Blackboard, Excel, Keynote or PowerPoint? These and so, so many more courses are available from Lynda.com. Your students can take courses, too, on topics like basic code-writing skills, time management, information literacy and research paper writing.

Learning Express Library logoTest preparation with LearningExpress Library
SAT, ACT, TOEFL, AP Exams, GRE, HiSET – prepare for these tests and more with up-to-date courses and practice tests. LearningExpress has career help as well, with prep for occupational exams (Praxis, Civil Service, EMT Certification) and skills building courses (business writing, popular Microsoft software). 

Transparent Language OnlineLanguage learning and ESL help from Transparent Language Online
Transparent Language Online provides an effective experience for learners of all levels looking to build their listening, speaking, reading and writing skills in a foreign language. This learning program provides courses and supplemental resources for over 95 languages, including English as a Second Language (ESL) materials for native speakers of 26 languages.

The post Tech for Teachers, Free @ DBRL appeared first on DBRL Next.

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Reader Review: Maine

DBRL Next - July 30, 2015

maineMaine” is a story about three women, all related, who find themselves in different situations in their life but sharing their family vacation home in Maine. The women look back at events in their lives, how they’ve reacted to situations and built or destroyed relationships and what shaped them into the people they have become (or could have become if it weren’t for the structure and history of their family). This is a great summer read; the chapters are all built around the three main characters and move along at a quick pace. It’s a bit bittersweet, though, and not just because of the characters’ lives unraveling. It makes you realize that summer vacations come to an end, and we have to return to our lives.

Two words that describe this book: poignant, bittersweet, fun

You might want to pick this book up if: You’ve ever taken a family vacation or even thought about it.

-Laura

The post Reader Review: Maine appeared first on DBRL Next.

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Summer Reading Ends August 15

DBRLTeen - July 30, 2015

Comic Book StruckYour story doesn’t end on this day, but Summer Reading does. August 15 is the final day for participants of all ages to claim rewards and enter into the final drawings for Summer Reading incentives.

Those who have completed the Teen Summer Reading Challenge can claim their free book at any of our three libraries or bookmobile stops. Finishers’ names will also be entered into a drawing for a Kindle E-reader (black and white) and other surprises!

If you have questions, please feel free to leave a comment, email us at teen@dbrl.org or call (573) 443-3161. It has been a pleasure for our staff to work with the over 300 teens who participated in this year’s program!

Photo by Flickr User Nawal Al-Mashouq. Used under Creative Commons license.

Originally published at Summer Reading Ends August 15.

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Nautical Adventures

Next Book Buzz - July 29, 2015

Book cover for Two Years Before the MastAs the summer heats up, many of us find that a great way to cool off is to head to the water. The swimming beach at Stephens Lake Park is a favorite place for my family to spend the afternoon, and we also enjoy canoeing at Finger Lakes State Park. In a figurative sense, one can cool off by reading great books about traveling on water, and the library has many that fit the bill. Let’s take a look at a few new and classic titles.

In the spring of 1834, Richard Henry Dana Jr. was a young man recently dropped out of Harvard University because of poor health and looking for something to do while recuperating from his illness. He signed on with the Pilgrim, a ship that launched from Boston. Dana recounted his experience in arguably the greatest work of maritime nonfiction, “Two Years Before the Mast.” The Pilgrim spent a great deal of time on the coast of colonial California, and Dana’s writing about these explorations is one of our best documents of the very early settlement period there. Dana also examines at length the injustices imparted upon common sailors. “The captain, in the first place, is lord paramount. He stands no watch, comes and goes as he pleases, and is accountable to no one,” writes Dana.

Dana was also obsessed, as were most sailors on these multi-year voyages, with the offerings of food and drink. “Food at Sea: Shipboard Cuisine From Ancient to Modern Times” by Simon Spalding is a detailed look at the history of food found on ocean-going vessels. On a ship like the Pilgrim, the fare was described in the following way by a common sailor: “the mush is never cooked, the beans are awful, and the Cape Cod turkey, or in plain English, the codfish, is the meanest mess of all.”

Book cover for ShackletonDozens of books have been written about Ernest Shackleton and his expeditions to the Antarctic, but two stand out in the crowd for their uniqueness. The first is the graphic novel “Shackleton: Antarctic Odyssey” by Nick Bertozzi. Historically accurate and concise, grabbing from Shackleton’s and other expedition members’ diaries, this thin volume will delight readers young and old. “Shackleton’s Boat Journey” authored by Frank Worsley, the captain of the Endurance, is also of note. In order to save his crew, Shackleton made a harrowing journey from Elephant Island to South Georgia Island. Shackleton’s eight men almost miraculously made it across this stretch of the Southern Ocean in a 12-foot boat, mainly due to Worsley’s uncanny skill at navigating by dead reckoning. This ocean journey is an accomplishment with few modern corollaries and was indeed performed near the apex of Antarctic winter. As Edmund Hillary wrote in the introduction: “It only confirmed the view of his friends that Shackleton was ‘the greatest leader that ever came on God’s earth, bar none.’”

On a more local level, for a look at the historic navigation of the Missouri River, I suggest “Wild River, Wooden Boats” by Michael Gillespie. Gillespie says: “The untamed Missouri was as close to a living thing as a river could get.” In the chapter “Sudden Death” Gillespie catalogs a whole range of terrible ways that human beings could perish on steamships: “The steamer Big Hatchie blew her boilers at Hermann, Missouri on July 25, 1845. Thirty-five unidentified victims are buried in the cemetery there.”

Modern day Missouri has an incredible network of smaller rivers and creeks perfect for boating. “A Paddler’s Guide to Missouri” offers lots of information about these waterways. This handy guidebook was created by the Missouri Department of Conservation, and it includes a full listing of navigable rivers and streams in the state. It even has mile markers, maps and difficulty ratings for each section of the river run. Happy paddling this summer!

The post Nautical Adventures appeared first on DBRL Next.

Categories: Book Buzz

Nautical Adventures

DBRL Next - July 29, 2015

Book cover for Two Years Before the MastAs the summer heats up, many of us find that a great way to cool off is to head to the water. The swimming beach at Stephens Lake Park is a favorite place for my family to spend the afternoon, and we also enjoy canoeing at Finger Lakes State Park. In a figurative sense, one can cool off by reading great books about traveling on water, and the library has many that fit the bill. Let’s take a look at a few new and classic titles.

In the spring of 1834, Richard Henry Dana Jr. was a young man recently dropped out of Harvard University because of poor health and looking for something to do while recuperating from his illness. He signed on with the Pilgrim, a ship that launched from Boston. Dana recounted his experience in arguably the greatest work of maritime nonfiction, “Two Years Before the Mast.” The Pilgrim spent a great deal of time on the coast of colonial California, and Dana’s writing about these explorations is one of our best documents of the very early settlement period there. Dana also examines at length the injustices imparted upon common sailors. “The captain, in the first place, is lord paramount. He stands no watch, comes and goes as he pleases, and is accountable to no one,” writes Dana.

Dana was also obsessed, as were most sailors on these multi-year voyages, with the offerings of food and drink. “Food at Sea: Shipboard Cuisine From Ancient to Modern Times” by Simon Spalding is a detailed look at the history of food found on ocean-going vessels. On a ship like the Pilgrim, the fare was described in the following way by a common sailor: “the mush is never cooked, the beans are awful, and the Cape Cod turkey, or in plain English, the codfish, is the meanest mess of all.”

Book cover for ShackletonDozens of books have been written about Ernest Shackleton and his expeditions to the Antarctic, but two stand out in the crowd for their uniqueness. The first is the graphic novel “Shackleton: Antarctic Odyssey” by Nick Bertozzi. Historically accurate and concise, grabbing from Shackleton’s and other expedition members’ diaries, this thin volume will delight readers young and old. “Shackleton’s Boat Journey” authored by Frank Worsley, the captain of the Endurance, is also of note. In order to save his crew, Shackleton made a harrowing journey from Elephant Island to South Georgia Island. Shackleton’s eight men almost miraculously made it across this stretch of the Southern Ocean in a 12-foot boat, mainly due to Worsley’s uncanny skill at navigating by dead reckoning. This ocean journey is an accomplishment with few modern corollaries and was indeed performed near the apex of Antarctic winter. As Edmund Hillary wrote in the introduction: “It only confirmed the view of his friends that Shackleton was ‘the greatest leader that ever came on God’s earth, bar none.’”

On a more local level, for a look at the historic navigation of the Missouri River, I suggest “Wild River, Wooden Boats” by Michael Gillespie. Gillespie says: “The untamed Missouri was as close to a living thing as a river could get.” In the chapter “Sudden Death” Gillespie catalogs a whole range of terrible ways that human beings could perish on steamships: “The steamer Big Hatchie blew her boilers at Hermann, Missouri on July 25, 1845. Thirty-five unidentified victims are buried in the cemetery there.”

Modern day Missouri has an incredible network of smaller rivers and creeks perfect for boating. “A Paddler’s Guide to Missouri” offers lots of information about these waterways. This handy guidebook was created by the Missouri Department of Conservation, and it includes a full listing of navigable rivers and streams in the state. It even has mile markers, maps and difficulty ratings for each section of the river run. Happy paddling this summer!

The post Nautical Adventures appeared first on DBRL Next.

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Reader Review: Bone to Be Wild

DBRL Next - July 28, 2015

Book cover for Bone to Be WildAfter the breakup of her engagement, Sarah Booth Delaney embarks on another case. This time she is investigating threats against a local blues club. The story takes many twists and turns, and Sarah Booth’s friends – Tinkie, Cece and Coleman – are instrumental in solving the case.

I love the Sarah Booth Delaney series because there is always a good mystery that keeps me guessing, but also because of the characters. The relationships between the characters are really what keep me coming back to see where they will go next. Especially Jitty, the ghost that does her fair share of complicating life for Sarah Booth, as well as providing some comic relief.

Three words that describe this book: mystery, Southern, adventure

You might want to pick this book up if: I found this series by looking for something similar to the Janet Evanovich Stephanie Plum series. While this one is similar in that the characters that become private investigators weren’t actually trained for that profession and they also get themselves in a fair amount of trouble, the series itself is a bit more serious than the Janet Evanovich books. Other similarities are strong female characters, the relationship development among the characters and the mystery aspect.

-Anonymous

The post Reader Review: Bone to Be Wild appeared first on DBRL Next.

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The League of Outsider Baseball

Next Book Buzz - July 27, 2015

Book cover for The League of Outsider BaseballSports are big business. The athletes are treated as commodities, and they are salesmen. They aren’t just coached on how to play their sport, but also on how to speak to the press. (It’s in cliches and non-answer answers. Really riveting stuff.) Sometimes it seems the true measure of an athlete’s accomplishments isn’t how many rings they win but the number of sponsorships they get.

Beneath this veneer of brand-spokesman blandness, corporate PR and the talking hairdos on 24-hour sports networks, something weird is still going on. The rules are arbitrary, the feats of physical accomplishments are freakish, and this slick business culture is built on a simple obsession over games. Yes, the fans can get obsessive, but the athletes themselves? They need an intervention. Ridiculous salaries for a few can make us forget how many people there are still playing their sport for very little. How many players in the Minor Leagues are sharing small apartments with teammates compared to Major League players with shoe contracts? Or Olympic athletes training early in the morning before work? It gets under their skin, and they have to play the game. Weird.

The League of Outsider Baseball” captures some of that obsessive weirdness. Author and Illustrator Gary Cieradkowski has put together a collection of beautifully illustrated profiles of baseball players. Some are household names, like Babe Ruth, but most are lesser known or forgotten players, like the ones you meet in the chapter, “The Could-Have-Beens.” Some of these players could have been household names too, but dumb luck or bad life choices derailed their promising careers. Take Pistol Pete Reiser, whose combination of physical skill and unbridled enthusiasm for the game gave him a penchant for playing through serious injuries and running into outfield walls. Once he was knocked unconscious so long a priest performed last rights. The chapter, “The Oddballs” is populated with unlikely contributions to baseball history from a one-armed pitcher, a hunchbacked orphan, one team composed entirely of brothers and another from an apocalyptic sect. This is the scruffy underbelly of baseball, and it’s fascinating reading.

This project started for Cieradkowski as a way of coping with the loss of his father. Swapping stories of obscure baseball players several times a week was one way they stayed connected. When his father died unexpectedly, Cieradkowski realized he didn’t have anyone to share this obsession with. He started a blog, The Infinite Baseball Card Set, to honor that relationship with his father and share his passion for these forgotten players with the rest of the world. Reading “The League of Outsider Baseball” is akin to a friend sharing their prized collection of baseball cards with you.

See Also
A few more books that give you a tour of baseball’s scruffy underbelly (The titles say it all):

Outsider Baseball. The Weird World of Hardball on the Fringe, 1876-1950,” by, Scott Simkus.

The Summer of Beer and Whiskey. How Brewers, Barkeeps, Rowdies, Immigrants, and A Wild Pennant Fight Made Baseball America’s Game,” by Edward Achorn.

Book cover for Big Hair and Plastic GrassBig Hair and Plastic Grass. A Funky Ride Through Baseball and America in the Swinging ’70s,” by Dan Epstein.

Who’s on Worst? The Lousiest Players, Biggest Cheaters, Saddest Goats and Other Antiheroes in Baseball History,” by Filip Bondy.

The post The League of Outsider Baseball appeared first on DBRL Next.

Categories: Book Buzz

The League of Outsider Baseball

DBRL Next - July 27, 2015

Book cover for The League of Outsider BaseballSports are big business. The athletes are treated as commodities, and they are salesmen. They aren’t just coached on how to play their sport, but also on how to speak to the press. (It’s in cliches and non-answer answers. Really riveting stuff.) Sometimes it seems the true measure of an athlete’s accomplishments isn’t how many rings they win but the number of sponsorships they get.

Beneath this veneer of brand-spokesman blandness, corporate PR and the talking hairdos on 24-hour sports networks, something weird is still going on. The rules are arbitrary, the feats of physical accomplishments are freakish, and this slick business culture is built on a simple obsession over games. Yes, the fans can get obsessive, but the athletes themselves? They need an intervention. Ridiculous salaries for a few can make us forget how many people there are still playing their sport for very little. How many players in the Minor Leagues are sharing small apartments with teammates compared to Major League players with shoe contracts? Or Olympic athletes training early in the morning before work? It gets under their skin, and they have to play the game. Weird.

The League of Outsider Baseball” captures some of that obsessive weirdness. Author and Illustrator Gary Cieradkowski has put together a collection of beautifully illustrated profiles of baseball players. Some are household names, like Babe Ruth, but most are lesser known or forgotten players, like the ones you meet in the chapter, “The Could-Have-Beens.” Some of these players could have been household names too, but dumb luck or bad life choices derailed their promising careers. Take Pistol Pete Reiser, whose combination of physical skill and unbridled enthusiasm for the game gave him a penchant for playing through serious injuries and running into outfield walls. Once he was knocked unconscious so long a priest performed last rights. The chapter, “The Oddballs” is populated with unlikely contributions to baseball history from a one-armed pitcher, a hunchbacked orphan, one team composed entirely of brothers and another from an apocalyptic sect. This is the scruffy underbelly of baseball, and it’s fascinating reading.

This project started for Cieradkowski as a way of coping with the loss of his father. Swapping stories of obscure baseball players several times a week was one way they stayed connected. When his father died unexpectedly, Cieradkowski realized he didn’t have anyone to share this obsession with. He started a blog, The Infinite Baseball Card Set, to honor that relationship with his father and share his passion for these forgotten players with the rest of the world. Reading “The League of Outsider Baseball” is akin to a friend sharing their prized collection of baseball cards with you.

See Also
A few more books that give you a tour of baseball’s scruffy underbelly (The titles say it all):

Outsider Baseball. The Weird World of Hardball on the Fringe, 1876-1950,” by, Scott Simkus.

The Summer of Beer and Whiskey. How Brewers, Barkeeps, Rowdies, Immigrants, and A Wild Pennant Fight Made Baseball America’s Game,” by Edward Achorn.

Book cover for Big Hair and Plastic GrassBig Hair and Plastic Grass. A Funky Ride Through Baseball and America in the Swinging ’70s,” by Dan Epstein.

Who’s on Worst? The Lousiest Players, Biggest Cheaters, Saddest Goats and Other Antiheroes in Baseball History,” by Filip Bondy.

The post The League of Outsider Baseball appeared first on DBRL Next.

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Wii U Family Game Night in Ashland

DBRLTeen - July 27, 2015

Mario Kart 8Wii U Family Game Night
Thursday, August 6 • 6:00 p.m.
Southern Boone County Public Library

Try out the library’s Wii U game console. Become a dancing superstar in “Just Dance 2015″ or a gold cup winner in “Mario Kart 8.” Snacks provided. Ages 10 and older. Parents welcome.

Originally published at Wii U Family Game Night in Ashland.

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Sixth Summer Reading Gift Card Winner

DBRL Next - July 24, 2015

winnerCongratulations to Pam S., a Columbia Public Library patron, on winning our sixth Adult Summer Reading 2015 prize drawing. She is the recipient of a $25 Barnes & Noble gift card.

If you have not registered for the library’s Adult Summer Reading program, you can still do so online or by visiting any of our locations. Once you sign up, you are automatically entered in the prize drawings. Also, don’t forget to submit book reviews to increase your odds of winning. There are three drawings left this summer, so keep reading and sharing your reviews with us!

The post Sixth Summer Reading Gift Card Winner appeared first on DBRL Next.

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Top Ten Books Librarians Love: The August 2015 List

Next Book Buzz - July 24, 2015

The August LibraryReads list – the top 10 titles publishing next month that librarians across the country recommend – includes plenty of novels for summer’s last hurrah. (And for you true bibliophiles out there, columnist Michael Dirda delivers “Browsings,” a charming collection of essays about reading, genre fiction, book stores, famous pets in fiction and even library book sales!)

Book cover for Best Boy by Eli GottliebBest Boy” by Eli Gottlieb
“What happens when someone on the autism spectrum grows up, and they aren’t a cute little boy anymore? Gottlieb’s novel follows the story of Todd Aaron, a man in his fifties who has spent most of his life a resident of the Payton Living Center. Todd begins to wonder what lies beyond the gates of his institution. A funny and deeply affecting work.” – Elizabeth Olesh, Baldwin Public Library, Baldwin, NY

Book cover for The Nature of the Beast by Louise PennyThe Nature of the Beast: A Chief Inspector Gamache Novel” by Louise Penny
“Louise Penny set the bar high with her last two books, but she had no trouble clearing it with this one. All our old friends are back in Three Pines where a young boy with a compulsion to tell tall tales tells one true story with disastrous results. But which story is the truth and why is it so threatening? Exquisitely suspenseful, emotionally wrenching and thoroughly satisfying.” – Beth Mills, New Rochelle Public Library, New Rochelle, NY

Book cover for A Window Opens by Elisabeth EganA Window Opens” by Elisabeth Egan
“Alice Pearce has a pretty great life. She has a loving family and works part-time as an editor for a magazine. When her family’s financial situation takes a drastic turn, Alice finds that she needs to step up to the plate and contribute more, and she finds this comes at a cost. I think many women will see themselves in Alice’s character. I recommend this book to moms who need a little time to themselves; they might realize that maybe things aren’t so bad for them after all.” – Rosanna Johnson, Chandler Public Library, Chandler, AZ

And here is the rest of the list for your holds-placing pleasure! Be one of the first people in line for these anticipated titles.

The post Top Ten Books Librarians Love: The August 2015 List appeared first on DBRL Next.

Categories: Book Buzz

Top Ten Books Librarians Love: The August 2015 List

DBRL Next - July 24, 2015

The August LibraryReads list – the top 10 titles publishing next month that librarians across the country recommend – includes plenty of novels for summer’s last hurrah. (And for you true bibliophiles out there, columnist Michael Dirda delivers “Browsings,” a charming collection of essays about reading, genre fiction, book stores, famous pets in fiction and even library book sales!)

Book cover for Best Boy by Eli GottliebBest Boy” by Eli Gottlieb
“What happens when someone on the autism spectrum grows up, and they aren’t a cute little boy anymore? Gottlieb’s novel follows the story of Todd Aaron, a man in his fifties who has spent most of his life a resident of the Payton Living Center. Todd begins to wonder what lies beyond the gates of his institution. A funny and deeply affecting work.” – Elizabeth Olesh, Baldwin Public Library, Baldwin, NY

Book cover for The Nature of the Beast by Louise PennyThe Nature of the Beast: A Chief Inspector Gamache Novel” by Louise Penny
“Louise Penny set the bar high with her last two books, but she had no trouble clearing it with this one. All our old friends are back in Three Pines where a young boy with a compulsion to tell tall tales tells one true story with disastrous results. But which story is the truth and why is it so threatening? Exquisitely suspenseful, emotionally wrenching and thoroughly satisfying.” – Beth Mills, New Rochelle Public Library, New Rochelle, NY

Book cover for A Window Opens by Elisabeth EganA Window Opens” by Elisabeth Egan
“Alice Pearce has a pretty great life. She has a loving family and works part-time as an editor for a magazine. When her family’s financial situation takes a drastic turn, Alice finds that she needs to step up to the plate and contribute more, and she finds this comes at a cost. I think many women will see themselves in Alice’s character. I recommend this book to moms who need a little time to themselves; they might realize that maybe things aren’t so bad for them after all.” – Rosanna Johnson, Chandler Public Library, Chandler, AZ

And here is the rest of the list for your holds-placing pleasure! Be one of the first people in line for these anticipated titles.

The post Top Ten Books Librarians Love: The August 2015 List appeared first on DBRL Next.

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Stay Connected @ Your Library

DBRLTeen - July 24, 2015

With the end of summer fast approaching, I wanted to share all the ways the library helps you stay connected to the books and services you love most. All you need is an internet connection, an email address and a library card.

Like us on Facebook: www.facebook.com/YourDBRL.

Download an eBook or audiobook through Overdrive.
Whether you enjoy reading on your iPad or Kindle, or listening on your smartphone, this service provides you with free titles to download at anytime. View a list of devices compatible with this service, or download the iOS or Android app.

Watch movies or stream music through Hoopla.
Through our newest online service, you can watch movies and TV shows, or listen to music and audiobooks with your computer or mobile device for free. Download the Hoopla app for iOSAndroid or Kindle Fire HDX to begin enjoying thousands of titles from major film studios, recording companies and publishers.

Borrow digital magazines for free through Zinio.
With your library card, you can access over 100 free digital magazines on your computer, tablet or smartphone such as Seventeen, ESPN, Girl’s Life, Rolling Stone, Teen Vogue, Popular Science, US Weekly and many more. Get the app for your iOSAndroid,  Kindle FireBlackberryNook HD or Windows 8 mobile device.

Submit a book review.
We love to hear about what teens are reading! Using this form, share your thoughts on the the books you love… and loathe. Select reviews will be highlighted at teens.dbrl.org.

Subscribe to our teen book eNewsletter.
Get a monthly email newsletter focusing on the most popular new releases in young adult fiction.

Join an online book club.
Each weekday you will receive successive five-minute selections from the beginning of a current teen book. By the end of the week, you’ll have read 2-3 chapters.

Register for our monthly teen program update.
Receive an email each month with a listing of our upcoming programs like writing workshops, book giveaways, art contests and teen gaming nights.

Sign up for DBRLTeen’s blog updates.
Get library program reminders, contest announcements, as well as book reviews and recommendations delivered directly to your inbox.

Originally published at Stay Connected @ Your Library.

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Reader Review: The Ingenious Mr. Pyke

DBRL Next - July 23, 2015

ingenious mr pykeThe Ingenious Mr. Pyke” is a biography of the brilliant and eccentric Englishman Geoffrey Pyke. He applied his intellect to the problems of the first half of the 20th century, especially the conflicts that erupted across Europe and the world over and over again during those years. The author organizes the material so that readers understand how Pyke framed questions and searched for answers. This is the story of a hero, in keeping with the theme of this summer’s reading program, and the book even includes a few “Superman” panels, yet Geoffrey Pyke was not a superhero but a complicated man living in difficult times.

Three words that describe this book: thought-provoking, interesting, well-written

You might want to pick this book up if: you are interested in creativity, history, political theory, narrative non-fiction and accounts of adventure and travel. I think that anyone who found the film “The Imitation Game” engrossing would also appreciate the book.

-Helen

The post Reader Review: The Ingenious Mr. Pyke appeared first on DBRL Next.

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