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Project Teen: Anti-Valentine’s Day Party

DBRLTeen - January 19, 2016

no_cupidProject Teen: Anti-Valentine’s Day Party
Monday, February 1, 6-7:30 p.m.
Columbia Public Library

If you think valentines are okay, but fat babies carrying bows and arrows seem kind of creepy, then join us to forget about cupid. Snacks and music with your friends is better, anyway. Join us for utterly unromantic crafts and fun activities. Ages 12-18. Registration begins Tuesday, January 19. To sign-up, please call (573) 443-3161.

Project Teen: Anti-Valentine’s Day
Thursday, February 18, 6:30-7:30 p.m.
Callaway County Public Library

Sick of all the red and pink hearts at this time of year? Join us for utterly unromantic crafts and fun activities using black, blue, green, any color but red! Ages 12-18.

Originally published at Project Teen: Anti-Valentine’s Day Party.

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The Gentleman Recommends: Glenn Taylor

Next Book Buzz - January 18, 2016

Book cover for A Hanging at Cinder BottomAs the old saying goes, “…judge a book by its cover.” The eye-catching cover of “A Hanging at Cinder Bottom” by Glenn Taylor caught my eyes, and the contents held them. If my team of editors, web developers, interns and chefs has done its job, the cover should be to the right. A keen eye will spot a monkey on a pedestal. Beware though: the monkey doesn’t show up until deep into the novel, and he doesn’t appear on a pedestal, but the wait and subterfuge about his standing gear is worth it. He’s a brave and loyal little rascal, and he wins his owner’s bets by being able to drink a bottle of beer and smoke a cigarette in under two minutes. Now, we’ve all seen our share of smoking, alcoholic monkeys, but this monkey is special. His owner, Tony Thumbs (he’s missing a thumb), loves him, and this gentleman reader was moved by the revelation that Tony, out of concern for the monkey’s health, only asked his little pal to pull the trick on occasion, when it might prove useful in making friends.

While it shouldn’t take more than a quality monkey to sell you on “A Hanging at Cinder Bottom,” it is a ripping yarn written with a poet’s dedication to word choice, and it is about much more than an awesome monkey. There is also a stage show featuring a man perfectly playing the tune “Yankee Doodle” with his farts.

The novel opens in 1910 with life-long loves Abe Baach, a card sharp and conman, and Goldie Toothman, a brothel madam capable of throwing a playing card with deadly precision, awaiting the gallows for murdering the mayor. With ropes around necks and Abe’s promise to “tell the truth before I die” or “walk out of hell in kerosene drawers and set the world on fire” ringing in the crowd’s ears, the evil sheriff collapses on the stage and lets loose some profound flatulence, and with that ringing in the crowd’s ears:

“The sun came free of the clouds then, and the people looked skyward, and there was only the north-born sound of the tardy noon train’s wheeze. The engine was not yet fully stopped at the station when men began to jump from inside the empty coal hoppers. They hit the hard dirt beside the railbed and rolled and got to their feet quick. They ran on wrenched ankles, headlong into the people staring at the heavens.”

And there, as we hope those men are injuring their ankles in an effort to save our charming heroes, the novel leaps back to 1877, and then to 1897, so that we might better understand why our protagonists would run afoul of the most powerful people in the county. Then the novel returns to 1910 and the months leading up to the hanging, where the bulk of our time is spent, and we get the story of the long con that puts them in the nooses we find them in at the beginning. While you might guess the general thrust of the ending, the specifics will delight you. Someone will eventually film the closing sequence, and while it will be impossible to improve on the novel and a reader’s imagination, it will be great fun to see someone try. Here’s hoping they cast the right monkey.

The post The Gentleman Recommends: Glenn Taylor appeared first on DBRL Next.

Categories: Book Buzz

The Gentleman Recommends: Glenn Taylor

DBRL Next - January 18, 2016

Book cover for A Hanging at Cinder BottomAs the old saying goes, “…judge a book by its cover.” The eye-catching cover of “A Hanging at Cinder Bottom” by Glenn Taylor caught my eyes, and the contents held them. If my team of editors, web developers, interns and chefs has done its job, the cover should be to the right. A keen eye will spot a monkey on a pedestal. Beware though: the monkey doesn’t show up until deep into the novel, and he doesn’t appear on a pedestal, but the wait and subterfuge about his standing gear is worth it. He’s a brave and loyal little rascal, and he wins his owner’s bets by being able to drink a bottle of beer and smoke a cigarette in under two minutes. Now, we’ve all seen our share of smoking, alcoholic monkeys, but this monkey is special. His owner, Tony Thumbs (he’s missing a thumb), loves him, and this gentleman reader was moved by the revelation that Tony, out of concern for the monkey’s health, only asked his little pal to pull the trick on occasion, when it might prove useful in making friends.

While it shouldn’t take more than a quality monkey to sell you on “A Hanging at Cinder Bottom,” it is a ripping yarn written with a poet’s dedication to word choice, and it is about much more than an awesome monkey. There is also a stage show featuring a man perfectly playing the tune “Yankee Doodle” with his farts.

The novel opens in 1910 with life-long loves Abe Baach, a card sharp and conman, and Goldie Toothman, a brothel madam capable of throwing a playing card with deadly precision, awaiting the gallows for murdering the mayor. With ropes around necks and Abe’s promise to “tell the truth before I die” or “walk out of hell in kerosene drawers and set the world on fire” ringing in the crowd’s ears, the evil sheriff collapses on the stage and lets loose some profound flatulence, and with that ringing in the crowd’s ears:

“The sun came free of the clouds then, and the people looked skyward, and there was only the north-born sound of the tardy noon train’s wheeze. The engine was not yet fully stopped at the station when men began to jump from inside the empty coal hoppers. They hit the hard dirt beside the railbed and rolled and got to their feet quick. They ran on wrenched ankles, headlong into the people staring at the heavens.”

And there, as we hope those men are injuring their ankles in an effort to save our charming heroes, the novel leaps back to 1877, and then to 1897, so that we might better understand why our protagonists would run afoul of the most powerful people in the county. Then the novel returns to 1910 and the months leading up to the hanging, where the bulk of our time is spent, and we get the story of the long con that puts them in the nooses we find them in at the beginning. While you might guess the general thrust of the ending, the specifics will delight you. Someone will eventually film the closing sequence, and while it will be impossible to improve on the novel and a reader’s imagination, it will be great fun to see someone try. Here’s hoping they cast the right monkey.

The post The Gentleman Recommends: Glenn Taylor appeared first on DBRL Next.

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Win a Pair of Lux Passes to the True/False Film Fest

DBRL Next - January 15, 2016

True False LogoUPDATE: This contest is now closed. Congratulations to Chris W. of Boone County, our Lux Pass winner! Thanks to all who entered.

Saturday, January 30, at 10:30 a.m., the Columbia Public Library will be hosting our fourth annual “How to True/False” with 102.3 BXR and 1400 KFRU. You’ll get a step-by-step explanation of all things True/False, including a Q&A session with fest organizers. They will also share an exclusive sneak peek at a few films before the official fest schedule is released.

Space is limited, so plan to arrive early. For easier parking, consider using the library’s north lot, across from Landmark Bank at the corner of Garth and Walnut.

In celebration of our partnership with the True/False Film Fest, we are giving away two free Lux passes to one lucky winner. You must register online to enter. These passes, valued at $200 each, will give you nearly unlimited access to the festival’s most popular films and special events. The winner will be selected at random and contacted on Monday, February 1. One entry per person, please. You must live in Boone or Callaway County to be eligible. Good luck!

The post Win a Pair of Lux Passes to the True/False Film Fest appeared first on DBRL Next.

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Staff Review: Walk on Earth a Stranger by Rae Carson

DBRLTeen - January 14, 2016

Walk on Earth a StrangerWhy I Checked It Out: “Walk on Earth a Stranger” is by Rae Carson! That’s why! I mean, I loved her “Fire and Thorn” series, so that was really the only reason I needed to put this on hold and excitedly wait for its release.

What It’s About: I didn’t know the book was a historical fantasy until I got it in my hands and started reading. It’s set during the great California gold rush, and follows Lee Westfall, a young girl with the ability to magically sense gold. Can you already see the complications that might cause? A gold rush and a girl who can sense gold? The book focuses on her struggle to cross the country and keep her secret safe.

What I liked About It: It’s a very unique idea. It’s not a knock-off, or a combination of two different stories already published. It is fresh and different. It also covers a historical time period that YA books have yet to really focus on. 

Besides that, Rae Carson is an amazing writer and Lee Westfall is a great character who is easy to love. Overall the book was a bumpy, suspenseful wagon ride across the country.

What I didn’t Like About It: Although original, “Walk on Earth a Stranger” was a little expected. Once Lee sets off for California, you kind of knew what was going to happen. People were going to die while they crossed the country from the expected Oregon trail traveling blunders– wagon train attacks, starvation, and illness.

After a point, some parts of the long journey across the country dragged. I did get to a point where I was like, “Can’t we just get to California already!?” That aside, I still had no trouble reading it in a couple weeks, and not once did I even consider putting it back on the shelf. I would still highly recommend it.

Similar Titles: If you haven’t read Rae Carson’s other trilogy yet, I would highly suggest checking out the first book in the series, “The Girl of Fire and Thorns.” While more fantasy than “Walk on Earth a Stranger,” it is still a great read!

For some other historical fantasy reads, check out Libba Bray’s “A Great and Terrible Beauty,” set in the Victorian era or “Grave Mercy” by Robin LaFevers which takes place during the Middle Ages.

And remember, “Walk on Earth a Stranger” is the first in a trilogy, with the next book coming out sometime next year.

Originally published at Staff Review: Walk on Earth a Stranger by Rae Carson.

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New DVD List: Meru, Finders Keepers & More

DBRL Next - January 13, 2016

meru imageHere is a new DVD list highlighting various titles recently added to the library’s collection.

meruMeru
Trailer / Website / Reviews
Playing last year at the True False Film Fest, this film follows three renowned climbers as they navigate nature’s harshest elements and their own complicated inner demons to ascend Mount Meru, the most technically complicated and dangerous peak in the Himalayas. Meru is the story of that journey – one of friendship, sacrifice, hope and obsession.

finders keepersFinders Keepers
Trailer / Website / Reviews
Another True False Film Fest pick, this film finds recovering addict and amputee John Wood in a battle to reclaim his mummified leg from Southern entrepreneur Shannon Whisnant, who found it in a grill he bought at an auction. The stranger-than-fiction chain of events soon sets John heading to his certain demise.

hunting groundThe Hunting Ground
Trailer / Website / Reviews
Playing in 2015 at the Missouri Theatre, this film is a startling expose of sexual assault on US campuses, their institutional cover-ups and the devastating toll they take on students and their families. Weaving together footage and first person testimonies, the film follows the lives of several undergraduate assault survivors.


kurt cobainKurt Cobain: Montage of Heck
Trailer / Website / Reviews
Playing at the 2015 True False Film Fest, this film explores Kurt Cobain like never before in the only fully authorized portrait of the famed music icon. Directed by acclaimed film maker Brett Morgen, who blends Cobain’s personal archive of art, music, movies, animation and revelatory interviews from his family and closest friends.

twinstersTwinsters” 
Trailer / Website / Reviews
A remarkable true story of identity and journey into sisterhood. Raised on different continents, with no idea the other existed, and connected 25 years later through social media, Samantha and Anais discover that they are identical twin sisters separated at birth. The film explores the ideas of family, adoption, nature vs. nurture and the power of social media.

Other notable releases:
Seymour” – 
 Website / Reviews / Trailer
Burroughs” –
Website / Reviews / Trailer
Mr. Dynamite: The Rise of James Brown” – Website / Reviews / Trailer
1971 – Website / Reviews / Trailer
Fear the Walking Dead” 
 – Season 1 – Website / Reviews
One Cut One LifeWebsite / Reviews / Trailer
HannibalSeason 3 – Website / Reviews
Matt Shepard Is A Friend of MineWebsite / Reviews / Trailer
Doc MartinSeries 7 – Website / Reviews
Emptying the SkiesWebsite / Reviews / Trailer
ShamelessSeason 5 – Website / Reviews

The post New DVD List: Meru, Finders Keepers & More appeared first on DBRL Next.

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Finding Summer Jobs for Teens

DBRLTeen - January 12, 2016

Finding Summer Jobs for Teens
Wednesday, January 27, 4-5:30 p.m.
Columbia Public Library

Starting a summer job search now can help you find work that will contribute to a fun and profitable summer vacation. We’ll look at local resources for teen job-seekers. You will leave with resources in hand, including a personalized form which will make it easier to complete applications. Snacks provided. Ages 15-18. Registration begins Tuesday, January 12. Please call (573) 443-3161 to sign up. 

Originally published at Finding Summer Jobs for Teens.

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Classics For Everyone: Brave New World

Next Book Buzz - January 11, 2016

Book cover for Brave New WorldKids these days, with their “Hunger Games” and “Divergent.” The millennial generation thinks they’re the first ones to discover futuristic dystopian literature? I’ll show them futuristic dystopian literature. Aldous Huxley was writing it before their grandparents were born.

His 1932 book, “Brave New World,” presents a society where lives are created by cloning and controlled through technology and drugs. Fulfillment is meant to be found in consumer goods, and Henry Ford is worshiped. A caste system is enforced through genetic engineering. There are no families, no personal attachments. Or at least there aren’t supposed to be.

Enter John, aka “the Savage.” Through happenstance, he has grown up removed from the World State, raised by a mother, even, albeit not a stable one. His development was largely influenced by an old volume of the works of William Shakespeare, and it provides his frame of reference as he tries to understand what passes for the civilized world, once he is dropped into its midst. He repeatedly speaks of the “brave new world,” a quote from Miranda in Shakespeare’s play, “The Tempest.” But each time he utters the phrase, it takes on a different meaning.

John’s three main companions in his new life are Bernard Marx, who oversees psychological sleep training at the (human) Hatchery and Conditioning Center, Bernard’s friend Helmholtz Watson, a university lecturer and Lenina Crowne, a giver of vaccines at the Hatchery. All three are, in their own ways, discontent with life in their supposed Utopia, though Lenina tries her best to find happiness, or failing that, at least numbness.

“Brave New World” tackles questions that are still relevant today, issues about the role of technology and medical ethics. To what extent should we meddle with nature? How much can we improve life and health by doing so, and what do we risk losing? Is complacency the same as happiness? How much social engineering is acceptable in order to maintain a stable society?

Kids these days. Do they think they’re the first one to ask those questions? They’re not. Every generation asks them. Aldous Huxley saw this.

The post Classics For Everyone: Brave New World appeared first on DBRL Next.

Categories: Book Buzz

Classics For Everyone: Brave New World

DBRL Next - January 11, 2016

Book cover for Brave New WorldKids these days, with their “Hunger Games” and “Divergent.” The millennial generation thinks they’re the first ones to discover futuristic dystopian literature? I’ll show them futuristic dystopian literature. Aldous Huxley was writing it before their grandparents were born.

His 1932 book, “Brave New World,” presents a society where lives are created by cloning and controlled through technology and drugs. Fulfillment is meant to be found in consumer goods, and Henry Ford is worshiped. A caste system is enforced through genetic engineering. There are no families, no personal attachments. Or at least there aren’t supposed to be.

Enter John, aka “the Savage.” Through happenstance, he has grown up removed from the World State, raised by a mother, even, albeit not a stable one. His development was largely influenced by an old volume of the works of William Shakespeare, and it provides his frame of reference as he tries to understand what passes for the civilized world, once he is dropped into its midst. He repeatedly speaks of the “brave new world,” a quote from Miranda in Shakespeare’s play, “The Tempest.” But each time he utters the phrase, it takes on a different meaning.

John’s three main companions in his new life are Bernard Marx, who oversees psychological sleep training at the (human) Hatchery and Conditioning Center, Bernard’s friend Helmholtz Watson, a university lecturer and Lenina Crowne, a giver of vaccines at the Hatchery. All three are, in their own ways, discontent with life in their supposed Utopia, though Lenina tries her best to find happiness, or failing that, at least numbness.

“Brave New World” tackles questions that are still relevant today, issues about the role of technology and medical ethics. To what extent should we meddle with nature? How much can we improve life and health by doing so, and what do we risk losing? Is complacency the same as happiness? How much social engineering is acceptable in order to maintain a stable society?

Kids these days. Do they think they’re the first one to ask those questions? They’re not. Every generation asks them. Aldous Huxley saw this.

The post Classics For Everyone: Brave New World appeared first on DBRL Next.

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New Year, New You? Three Books for Your Best Self

Next Book Buzz - January 8, 2016

Year of Yes book coverI rarely make resolutions. I do like the notion of the coming year as a clean slate, a calendar full of possibilities, and I’m a proponent of self-improvement. However, I bristle at the typical resolution’s focus on weight loss or basis in dissatisfaction, what I don’t have or don’t do but should. And because they are so often abandoned, making resolutions feels like I’m setting myself up for failure.

This year I bucked my own trend and made some resolutions. Why? Maybe it’s because I’m in my 40s now and feel like I need to make some lifestyle adjustments for my future health. (Calcium supplements! Weight training!) Maybe it’s because I really like checking items off of to-do lists. (Session with personal trainer scheduled? Check! Best calcium supplements researched – I am a librarian, after all – and purchased? check!) Whatever the reason, I’ve started off 2016 as a goal-setter. If you want to join me and need some inspiration for shaking up your status quo, finding work-life balance or otherwise becoming a better version of yourself, pick up one of these books.

Book cover for 10% Happier10% Happier” by Dan Harris

Subtitled, “How I Tamed the Voice in My Head, Reduced Stress Without Losing My Edge, and Found Self-help That Actually Works – a True Story,” this often funny narrative winds up a convincing argument for meditation and mindfulness. While I haven’t read it yet, a woman in my book club quietly asserted that this book changed her life. Endorsement enough for me.

Year of Yes” by Shonda Rhimes

Chronicles of the year a writer spent conducting some sort of personal experiment – strictly living according to the bible, only eating food grown within 100 miles of home, etc. – are not new. However, Rhimes’ fresh and personal voice keeps her memoir from feeling like it’s something we’ve already heard. On her sister’s challenge, Rhimes embarks on a year of saying yes to things that scare her, from public speaking engagements to promotional opportunities. The outcomes are pretty dramatic, and Rhimes’ journey inspires.

Book cover for OverwhelmedOverwhelmed: Work, Love, and Play When No One Has the Time” by Brigid Schulte

I often think that if I added up all of those little chunks of time I spend at the end of my day scrolling through Facebook posts, I could get a whole lot more novel reading done. Or at least some laundry. Schulte investigates why modern workers (particularly women with kids) have so little leisure time. She looks to European countries for alternative models and makes some practical suggestions for time-management and reclaiming time we waste attempting to multitask or spend on manufactured busyness.

Happy New Year!

The post New Year, New You? Three Books for Your Best Self appeared first on DBRL Next.

Categories: Book Buzz

New Year, New You? Three Books for Your Best Self

DBRL Next - January 8, 2016

Year of Yes book coverI rarely make resolutions. I do like the notion of the coming year as a clean slate, a calendar full of possibilities, and I’m a proponent of self-improvement. However, I bristle at the typical resolution’s focus on weight loss or basis in dissatisfaction, what I don’t have or don’t do but should. And because they are so often abandoned, making resolutions feels like I’m setting myself up for failure.

This year I bucked my own trend and made some resolutions. Why? Maybe it’s because I’m in my 40s now and feel like I need to make some lifestyle adjustments for my future health. (Calcium supplements! Weight training!) Maybe it’s because I really like checking items off of to-do lists. (Session with personal trainer scheduled? Check! Best calcium supplements researched – I am a librarian, after all – and purchased? check!) Whatever the reason, I’ve started off 2016 as a goal-setter. If you want to join me and need some inspiration for shaking up your status quo, finding work-life balance or otherwise becoming a better version of yourself, pick up one of these books.

Book cover for 10% Happier10% Happier” by Dan Harris

Subtitled, “How I Tamed the Voice in My Head, Reduced Stress Without Losing My Edge, and Found Self-help That Actually Works – a True Story,” this often funny narrative winds up a convincing argument for meditation and mindfulness. While I haven’t read it yet, a woman in my book club quietly asserted that this book changed her life. Endorsement enough for me.

Year of Yes” by Shonda Rhimes

Chronicles of the year a writer spent conducting some sort of personal experiment – strictly living according to the bible, only eating food grown within 100 miles of home, etc. – are not new. However, Rhimes’ fresh and personal voice keeps her memoir from feeling like it’s something we’ve already heard. On her sister’s challenge, Rhimes embarks on a year of saying yes to things that scare her, from public speaking engagements to promotional opportunities. The outcomes are pretty dramatic, and Rhimes’ journey inspires.

Book cover for OverwhelmedOverwhelmed: Work, Love, and Play When No One Has the Time” by Brigid Schulte

I often think that if I added up all of those little chunks of time I spend at the end of my day scrolling through Facebook posts, I could get a whole lot more novel reading done. Or at least some laundry. Schulte investigates why modern workers (particularly women with kids) have so little leisure time. She looks to European countries for alternative models and makes some practical suggestions for time-management and reclaiming time we waste attempting to multitask or spend on manufactured busyness.

Happy New Year!

The post New Year, New You? Three Books for Your Best Self appeared first on DBRL Next.

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FAFSA Frenzy Sessions Begin Soon!

DBRLTeen - January 7, 2016

Scrabble MoneyWhat is the FAFSA and why is it important?

F-A-F-S-A. Commit these five letters to memory. If you plan on attending college, they will follow you throughout the course of your entire academic career.

FAFSA stands for Free Application for Federal Student Aid. All prospective college students looking to qualify for federal grants or loans must complete this online application. Most colleges also require this application so that they can award institutional scholarships based on financial need.

Another important note: Once you are admitted and attending college, you will have to complete this form every year until you graduate. Typically the latest version of the FAFSA form is available in early January, or shortly before.

Of all the applications you submit, your FAFSA ranks right up there with your application to the college or university you have chosen to attend. Translation: Very Important. You have through early spring to complete this online form, though deadlines vary by state. Be sure to review the 2015 FAFSA deadlines.

The Missouri Department of Higher Education has an assistance program called FAFSA Frenzy to help you and your family successfully complete this online application form. They will be hosting several free events at mid-Missouri high schools. If you are planning to attend college in the fall, mark your calendars now for one of these four sessions. 

Best all, FAFSA Frenzy attendees are entered for a chance to win a scholarship to a Missouri postsecondary institution for the Fall 2016 semester!

Where are FAFSA Frenzy events being held in Boone & Callaway counties?

Location: Address: Date & Time: Fulton High School 1 Hornet Dr., Fulton Wednesday, February 3 from 4:30-6:30 p.m. Battle High School 7575 St. Charles Road, Columbia Thursday, February 11 from 4:30-6:30 p.m. Hickman High School 1104 N. Providence Rd., Columbia Tuesday, February 9 from 5-7:00 p.m. Columbia Area Career Center 4203 S. Providence Rd. Sunday, February 28 from 2-4 p.m.

What to bring:

  • Your parents’ and your 2015 W-2 forms
  • Copies of your parents’ and your 2015 tax forms, if they are ready.

If you or your parents have not yet filed your 2015 tax returns, be sure to bring any statements of interest earned in 2015, any 1099 forms and any other forms required to complete your taxes.

Originally published at FAFSA Frenzy Sessions Begin Soon!.

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Audiobooks for Book Clubs on Hoopla

Next Book Buzz - January 6, 2016

Hoopla logoDo you love listening to audiobooks? Have you ever run all over town trying to find the book for your book club’s next meeting, only to discover that the slightly faster members of your book club already grabbed every copy available within a 50-mile radius? Hoopla can help! Hoopla is a media service that allows you to stream and download audiobooks, eBooks, comics, movies and television shows. Sign up for an account (this quick start guide shows you how), and borrow up to 10 items per month. The best part? Everyone in your book club can borrow the same book on Hoopla – there’s no limit to how many people can borrow an item at once!

Here are just a few of the book club-worthy titles available as audiobooks on Hoopla:

Book cover for My Brilliant Friend by Elena FerranteMy Brilliant Friend” is the first novel in the popular Neapolitan series by Italian author Elena Ferrante. Set in a downtrodden neighborhood, this story of female friendship is told in luscious prose. Book clubs will find lots to talk about in the forces that shape Elena and Lila’s evolving friendship.

Need a thriller that will keep you guessing? Try “The Good Girl” by Mary Kubica. Told in “before” and “after” and by multiple characters, this novel keeps the tension high as readers piece together the story.

Book cover for The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying UpIf your book club is approaching the new year with resolution-mindedness, then try “The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and Organizing” by Marie Kondo. This small book contains the tenets of the KonMari method, including a clothes-folding technique that turns messy dresser drawers into expanses of true beauty. Take before and after pics for a spirited discussion!

The post Audiobooks for Book Clubs on Hoopla appeared first on DBRL Next.

Categories: Book Buzz

Audiobooks for Book Clubs on Hoopla

DBRL Next - January 6, 2016

Hoopla logoDo you love listening to audiobooks? Have you ever run all over town trying to find the book for your book club’s next meeting, only to discover that the slightly faster members of your book club already grabbed every copy available within a 50-mile radius? Hoopla can help! Hoopla is a media service that allows you to stream and download audiobooks, eBooks, comics, movies and television shows. Sign up for an account (this quick start guide shows you how), and borrow up to 10 items per month. The best part? Everyone in your book club can borrow the same book on Hoopla – there’s no limit to how many people can borrow an item at once!

Here are just a few of the book club-worthy titles available as audiobooks on Hoopla:

Book cover for My Brilliant Friend by Elena FerranteMy Brilliant Friend” is the first novel in the popular Neapolitan series by Italian author Elena Ferrante. Set in a downtrodden neighborhood, this story of female friendship is told in luscious prose. Book clubs will find lots to talk about in the forces that shape Elena and Lila’s evolving friendship.

Need a thriller that will keep you guessing? Try “The Good Girl” by Mary Kubica. Told in “before” and “after” and by multiple characters, this novel keeps the tension high as readers piece together the story.

Book cover for The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying UpIf your book club is approaching the new year with resolution-mindedness, then try “The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and Organizing” by Marie Kondo. This small book contains the tenets of the KonMari method, including a clothes-folding technique that turns messy dresser drawers into expanses of true beauty. Take before and after pics for a spirited discussion!

The post Audiobooks for Book Clubs on Hoopla appeared first on DBRL Next.

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Project Teen: Zines

DBRLTeen - January 5, 2016

Project Teen Zine 225pxProject Teen: Zines
Monday, January 18, 1-2:30 p.m.
Columbia Public Library

Do you have a message you’re ready to share with the world? Tell it all in your own unique and personal homemade maga(zine). This pre-digital creative medium mixes storytelling, scrapbooking, collage and more. Ages 12-18. Registration begins Tuesday, January 5. To sign-up, please call (573) 443-3161.

Originally published at Project Teen: Zines.

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What a Year! My 2015 in Books

Next Book Buzz - January 4, 2016

Book cover for Can't We Talk About Something More Pleasant?Book cover for Being Mortal by Atul GawandeBook cover for Still AliceI am one of those crazy, weird, super geeky people that actually tracks what they read. Not only that, but I have participated in a reading challenge for the past five years. This year, I originally set a reading goal of 75 books and then increased it to 100 when it became apparent that I was going to blow right past the original goal. I have reached and surpassed my revised goal by reading 125 books! I had someone tell me that a personally difficult year translates into a fruitful reading year, and this seems to be true. Looking over my list, there are several stand-out books, some that I have already written about and others that deserve a mention. There are also a few stinkers, but why dwell on that? I also discovered some interesting trends in my reading.

A member of our family is struggling with the end stages of Alzheimer’s and bladder cancer, which is reflected in many of the books I read in 2015, including “Can’t We Please Talk About Something More Pleasant,” “Being Mortal” and “Still Alice.” All three of these books gave me comfort, courage and an expanded perspective.

Book cover for All the Light We Cannot SeeI found several incredible books that allowed me a few moments of pure escapism. “All the Light We Cannot See” is probably one of the most beautiful books I have ever read. “Good Lord Bird,” “Furiously Happy” and “Hyperbole and a Half” kept me laughing even about things that are not supposed to be funny. I really needed to find reasons to laugh this year.

There were nonfiction titles that kept my mind active during long periods of just waiting.  And waiting. And waiting. “The Disappearing Spoon: And Other True Tales of Madness, Love, and the History of the World from the Periodic Table of the Elements,” “Surely You’re Joking, Mr. Feynman” and “Knowledge is Beautiful: Impossible Ideas, Invisible Patterns, Hidden Connections – Visualized” all fed the geek in me.

Book cover for My Life on the RoadFor pure inspiration, I discovered a few role models. “My Life on the Road” by Gloria Steinem – I just want to HUG her! But I’m an introvert, and that would be creepy and weird, but still…I just want to HUG her! Or maybe I could be like her, except that I’m a horrible homebody. This is definitely one of my favorite books of the year. I had actually read Steinem’s classic, “Outrageous Acts and Everyday Rebellions,” earlier in the year before I even knew that she had another book coming out. Oddly enough, her books dovetailed nicely with Amanda Palmer’s “The Art of Asking: or How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Let People Help.” Okay, so Amanda Palmer can still make me very uncomfortable (blame it on my age, environment, introvertedness, whatever) but I also think I really love her. I mean really. Love her.

There are so many more great books that I probably should mention, but it’s time to look forward. My reading goal for next year is once again 75 books. I know that having read 125 I should try to keep that up, right? But I’m hoping for a happier and healthier year spent doing more things with family and friends. And hey, 75 is still a highly respectable goal!

Happy New Reading Year!

The post What a Year! My 2015 in Books appeared first on DBRL Next.

Categories: Book Buzz

What a Year! My 2015 in Books

DBRL Next - January 4, 2016

Book cover for Can't We Talk About Something More Pleasant?Book cover for Being Mortal by Atul GawandeBook cover for Still AliceI am one of those crazy, weird, super geeky people that actually tracks what they read. Not only that, but I have participated in a reading challenge for the past five years. This year, I originally set a reading goal of 75 books and then increased it to 100 when it became apparent that I was going to blow right past the original goal. I have reached and surpassed my revised goal by reading 125 books! I had someone tell me that a personally difficult year translates into a fruitful reading year, and this seems to be true. Looking over my list, there are several stand-out books, some that I have already written about and others that deserve a mention. There are also a few stinkers, but why dwell on that? I also discovered some interesting trends in my reading.

A member of our family is struggling with the end stages of Alzheimer’s and bladder cancer, which is reflected in many of the books I read in 2015, including “Can’t We Please Talk About Something More Pleasant,” “Being Mortal” and “Still Alice.” All three of these books gave me comfort, courage and an expanded perspective.

Book cover for All the Light We Cannot SeeI found several incredible books that allowed me a few moments of pure escapism. “All the Light We Cannot See” is probably one of the most beautiful books I have ever read. “Good Lord Bird,” “Furiously Happy” and “Hyperbole and a Half” kept me laughing even about things that are not supposed to be funny. I really needed to find reasons to laugh this year.

There were nonfiction titles that kept my mind active during long periods of just waiting.  And waiting. And waiting. “The Disappearing Spoon: And Other True Tales of Madness, Love, and the History of the World from the Periodic Table of the Elements,” “Surely You’re Joking, Mr. Feynman” and “Knowledge is Beautiful: Impossible Ideas, Invisible Patterns, Hidden Connections – Visualized” all fed the geek in me.

Book cover for My Life on the RoadFor pure inspiration, I discovered a few role models. “My Life on the Road” by Gloria Steinem – I just want to HUG her! But I’m an introvert, and that would be creepy and weird, but still…I just want to HUG her! Or maybe I could be like her, except that I’m a horrible homebody. This is definitely one of my favorite books of the year. I had actually read Steinem’s classic, “Outrageous Acts and Everyday Rebellions,” earlier in the year before I even knew that she had another book coming out. Oddly enough, her books dovetailed nicely with Amanda Palmer’s “The Art of Asking: or How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Let People Help.” Okay, so Amanda Palmer can still make me very uncomfortable (blame it on my age, environment, introvertedness, whatever) but I also think I really love her. I mean really. Love her.

There are so many more great books that I probably should mention, but it’s time to look forward. My reading goal for next year is once again 75 books. I know that having read 125 I should try to keep that up, right? But I’m hoping for a happier and healthier year spent doing more things with family and friends. And hey, 75 is still a highly respectable goal!

Happy New Reading Year!

The post What a Year! My 2015 in Books appeared first on DBRL Next.

Categories: More From DBRL...

After School in Ashland

DBRLTeen - December 31, 2015
Southern Boone Eagles Logo

This month, make logo items from shrinking plastic to support your favorite team.

Mark your calendars now for these cool after-school events scheduled for January at the Southern Boone County Public Library in Ashland.

Checkmate
Thursday, January 7, 3:30-4:30 p.m.
Southern Boone County Public Library
Join us for basic chess instruction and a chance to play one of the world’s oldest games at this drop-in program. Ages 11 and older.

Wii Game Time
Wednesday, January 13, 2:45-4:30 p.m.
Southern Boone County Public Library
Think you have the best dance moves? Prove it! Can you drive like Mario? Bring it! Come play a variety of games on the Wii U. Treats served. Teens.

The Book vs. the Movie
Wednesday, January 20, 2:45-4 p.m.
Southern Boone County Public Library
Have you read “Holes” by Louis Sachar and seen the movie based on the book? (If not, check them out from the library.) If so, come share your opinions about which was better and why. Snacks served. Ages 10 and older.

Checkmate
Thursday, January 21, 3:30-4:30 p.m.
Southern Boone County Public Library
Join us for basic chess instruction and a chance to play one of the world’s oldest games at this drop-in program. Ages 11 and older.

Team Spirit
Tuesday, January 26, 3:30-4:30 p.m.
Southern Boone County Public Library
Support for your favorite team by creating logo items from shrinking plastic that you can attach to a key chain, necklace or backpack. Ages 8-14.

Originally published at After School in Ashland.

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Your New Year’s Reading Resolution: Read Harder Book Challenge

Next Book Buzz - December 30, 2015

My reading stack photo by Chris Chapman, FlickrSure, you can resolve to make 2016 the year to lose 10 pounds, run a marathon or learn to speak Spanish. Those are all fine goals. But here at the library we like our resolutions literary, and book challenges fit the bill quite nicely.

What’s a book challenge? Basically, you read books according to a certain set of guidelines and share your reviews of those books with other readers. There are food writing challenges, debut author challenges and “to be read pile” challenges, just to name a few.

This year I’ve got my eye on Book Riot’s Read Harder Challenge. The idea is to read a book in each of 24 categories, many of which will require you to sample new genres and stretch your usual reading boundaries. Read a play! Read a collection of essays! Read a nonfiction book about science! Join this book challenge and be a better person. (Or at least get way better at trivia night and cocktail party small talk.) If you want to join this challenge, you can download a pdf of the reading task list. Not sure where to start? I’ve got recommendations for each of the categories below. Enjoy!

Book cover for Broken MonstersRead a horror book
Shining Girls” or “Broken Monsters” by Lauren Beukes or “Revival” by Stephen King

Read a nonfiction book about science
The Nurture Effect” by Anthony Biglan or anything by Mary Roach (“Gulp,” “Packing for Mars“)

Read a collection of essays
The Empathy Exams” by Leslie Jamison or “Our Only World” by Wendell Berry

Book cover for To Kill a MockingbirdRead a book out loud to someone else
To Kill a Mockingbird” by Harper Lee, “The Phantom Tollbooth” by Norton Juster or “The Book With no Pictures” by B. J. Novak

Read a middle grade novel
Wonder” by R.J. Palacio or “My Diary From the Edge of the World” by Jodi Lynn Anderson

Read a biography (not a memoir or autobiography)
Clementine: The Life of Mrs. Winston Churchill” by Sonia Purnell, “E.E. Cummings: A Life” by Susan Cheever or “The Wright Brothers” by David McCullough

Book cover for Zone OneRead a dystopian or post-apocalyptic novel
The Road” by Cormac McCarthy (obvious choice), “Zone One” by Colson Whitehead (zombies!) or “Station Eleven” by Emily St. John Mandel (no zombies! Shakespeare!)

Read a book originally published in the decade you were born
1960s: “Silent Spring” by Rachel Carson
1970s: “Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy” by John Le Carré
1980s: “The Handmaid’s Tale” by Margaret Atwood
1990s: “Paradise” by Toni Morrison

Book cover for Still Foolin' Em by Billy CrystalListen to an audiobook that has won an Audie award
Silkworm” by Robert Galbraith (Read by Robert Glenister) or “Still Foolin’ ‘Em” by Billy Crystal (Read by Billy Crystal)

Read a book over 500 pages long
All the Light we Cannot See” by Anthony Doerr or “The Secret History” by Donna Tartt

Read a book under 100 pages
The Metamorphosis” by Franz Kafka or “Turn of the Screw” by Henry James

Book cover for George by Alex GinoRead a book by or about a person that identifies as transgender
George” by Alex Gino or “She’s Not There” by Jennifer Finney Boylan

Read a book that is set in the Middle East
The Ruins of Us” by Keija Parssinen or “Persepolis” by Marjane Satrapi

Read a book that is by an author from Southeast Asia
In the Shadow of the Banyan” by Vaddey Ratner or “Sightseeing: Stories” by Rattawut Lapcharoensap

Book cover for The White QueenRead a book of historical fiction set before 1900
Caleb’s Crossing” by Geraldine Brooks or  “The White Queen” by Philippa Gregory

Read the first book in a series by a person of color
Devil in A Blue Dress” (first in a mystery series) by Walter Mosley or “The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms” (first in a sci-fi trilogy) by N.K. Jemisin

Read a non-superhero comic that debuted in the last three years
Descender” by Jeff Lemire or “The Woods” by James Tynion

Book cover for Brooklyn by Colm ToibinRead a book that was adapted into a movie, then watch the movie. Debate which is better
Brooklyn” by Colm Tóibín, “The Martian” by Andy Weir or “Me and Earl and the Dying Girl” by Jesse Andrews

Read a nonfiction book about feminism or dealing with feminist themes
How to Be a Woman” by Caitlin Moran or “Bad Feminist” by Roxane Gay

Read a book about religion (fiction or nonfiction)
Learning to Walk in the Dark” by Barbara Brown Taylor or “Islam Without Extremes: A Muslim Case for Liberty” by Mustafa Akyol

Book cover for Team of RivalsRead a book about politics, in your country or another (fiction or nonfiction)
Team of Rivals: The Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln” by Doris Kearns Goodwin or “Double Down” by Mark Halperin and John Heilemann

Read a food memoir
Blood, Bones, and Butter” by Gabrielle Hamilton or “Tender at the Bone” by Ruth Reichl

Read a play
Wit” by Margaret Edson or “The Piano Lesson” by August Wilson

Book cover for furiously happyRead a book with a main character that has a mental illness
Furiously Happy” by Jenny Lawson, “I Know This Much is True” by Wally Lamb or “Too Bright to Hear Too Loud to See” by Juliann Garey

Have other books you’d like to suggest in any of these categories? Let us know in the comments.

The post Your New Year’s Reading Resolution: Read Harder Book Challenge appeared first on DBRL Next.

Categories: Book Buzz

Your New Year’s Reading Resolution: Read Harder Book Challenge

DBRL Next - December 30, 2015

My reading stack photo by Chris Chapman, FlickrSure, you can resolve to make 2016 the year to lose 10 pounds, run a marathon or learn to speak Spanish. Those are all fine goals. But here at the library we like our resolutions literary, and book challenges fit the bill quite nicely.

What’s a book challenge? Basically, you read books according to a certain set of guidelines and share your reviews of those books with other readers. There are food writing challenges, debut author challenges and “to be read pile” challenges, just to name a few.

This year I’ve got my eye on Book Riot’s Read Harder Challenge. The idea is to read a book in each of 24 categories, many of which will require you to sample new genres and stretch your usual reading boundaries. Read a play! Read a collection of essays! Read a nonfiction book about science! Join this book challenge and be a better person. (Or at least get way better at trivia night and cocktail party small talk.) If you want to join this challenge, you can download a pdf of the reading task list. Not sure where to start? I’ve got recommendations for each of the categories below. Enjoy!

Book cover for Broken MonstersRead a horror book
Shining Girls” or “Broken Monsters” by Lauren Beukes or “Revival” by Stephen King

Read a nonfiction book about science
The Nurture Effect” by Anthony Biglan or anything by Mary Roach (“Gulp,” “Packing for Mars“)

Read a collection of essays
The Empathy Exams” by Leslie Jamison or “Our Only World” by Wendell Berry

Book cover for To Kill a MockingbirdRead a book out loud to someone else
To Kill a Mockingbird” by Harper Lee, “The Phantom Tollbooth” by Norton Juster or “The Book With no Pictures” by B. J. Novak

Read a middle grade novel
Wonder” by R.J. Palacio or “My Diary From the Edge of the World” by Jodi Lynn Anderson

Read a biography (not a memoir or autobiography)
Clementine: The Life of Mrs. Winston Churchill” by Sonia Purnell, “E.E. Cummings: A Life” by Susan Cheever or “The Wright Brothers” by David McCullough

Book cover for Zone OneRead a dystopian or post-apocalyptic novel
The Road” by Cormac McCarthy (obvious choice), “Zone One” by Colson Whitehead (zombies!) or “Station Eleven” by Emily St. John Mandel (no zombies! Shakespeare!)

Read a book originally published in the decade you were born
1960s: “Silent Spring” by Rachel Carson
1970s: “Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy” by John Le Carré
1980s: “The Handmaid’s Tale” by Margaret Atwood
1990s: “Paradise” by Toni Morrison

Book cover for Still Foolin' Em by Billy CrystalListen to an audiobook that has won an Audie award
Silkworm” by Robert Galbraith (Read by Robert Glenister) or “Still Foolin’ ‘Em” by Billy Crystal (Read by Billy Crystal)

Read a book over 500 pages long
All the Light we Cannot See” by Anthony Doerr or “The Secret History” by Donna Tartt

Read a book under 100 pages
The Metamorphosis” by Franz Kafka or “Turn of the Screw” by Henry James

Book cover for George by Alex GinoRead a book by or about a person that identifies as transgender
George” by Alex Gino or “She’s Not There” by Jennifer Finney Boylan

Read a book that is set in the Middle East
The Ruins of Us” by Keija Parssinen or “Persepolis” by Marjane Satrapi

Read a book that is by an author from Southeast Asia
In the Shadow of the Banyan” by Vaddey Ratner or “Sightseeing: Stories” by Rattawut Lapcharoensap

Book cover for The White QueenRead a book of historical fiction set before 1900
Caleb’s Crossing” by Geraldine Brooks or  “The White Queen” by Philippa Gregory

Read the first book in a series by a person of color
Devil in A Blue Dress” (first in a mystery series) by Walter Mosley or “The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms” (first in a sci-fi trilogy) by N.K. Jemisin

Read a non-superhero comic that debuted in the last three years
Descender” by Jeff Lemire or “The Woods” by James Tynion

Book cover for Brooklyn by Colm ToibinRead a book that was adapted into a movie, then watch the movie. Debate which is better
Brooklyn” by Colm Tóibín, “The Martian” by Andy Weir or “Me and Earl and the Dying Girl” by Jesse Andrews

Read a nonfiction book about feminism or dealing with feminist themes
How to Be a Woman” by Caitlin Moran or “Bad Feminist” by Roxane Gay

Read a book about religion (fiction or nonfiction)
Learning to Walk in the Dark” by Barbara Brown Taylor or “Islam Without Extremes: A Muslim Case for Liberty” by Mustafa Akyol

Book cover for Team of RivalsRead a book about politics, in your country or another (fiction or nonfiction)
Team of Rivals: The Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln” by Doris Kearns Goodwin or “Double Down” by Mark Halperin and John Heilemann

Read a food memoir
Blood, Bones, and Butter” by Gabrielle Hamilton or “Tender at the Bone” by Ruth Reichl

Read a play
Wit” by Margaret Edson or “The Piano Lesson” by August Wilson

Book cover for furiously happyRead a book with a main character that has a mental illness
Furiously Happy” by Jenny Lawson, “I Know This Much is True” by Wally Lamb or “Too Bright to Hear Too Loud to See” by Juliann Garey

Have other books you’d like to suggest in any of these categories? Let us know in the comments.

The post Your New Year’s Reading Resolution: Read Harder Book Challenge appeared first on DBRL Next.

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