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The Work of Denis Johnson

DBRL Next - February 6, 2015

Book cover for Train Dreams by Denis JohnsonIf you’re a Denis Johnson fan, part of the excitement about a forthcoming book is anticipating where he will take you this time. He is not an author to be pigeonholed. His wonderful novella, “Train Dreams,” was originally serialized in “The Paris Review” and was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in 2012. (Nobody won that year — the Pulitzer Committee couldn’t come to a final decision.) The story follows a day laborer’s travels in the American West during the early 20th century. Before that Johnson published another novella, “Nobody Move,” this time serialized in Playboy. It tells an archetypal noir story about a group of shady characters in pursuit of a bag of cash. You can get an idea of the diverse subjects he is interested in through his nonfiction collection, “Seek.” There he writes about hippies, militia groups, gold mining in Alaska, Christian biker gangs and war-ravaged Liberia.

Book cover for The Laughing Monsters by Denis JohnsonSome of his experiences in Liberia were inspiration for his newest book, “The Laughing Monsters.” This book treads some similar territory to a previous one, “Tree of Smoke.” That was Johnson’s “Big Novel,” which won the 2007 National Book Award. It focuses on a spy-in-training during the Vietnam War engaged in psychological operations against the Vietcong, but its scope is broad. Covering a span of 20 years, it is as much about the character of America as the war in Vietnam. “The Laughing Monsters,” on the other hand, is a novella with a small cast of characters, set in the present day, and covers a short period of time. Like “Tree of Smoke,” it concerns intelligence operatives who have represented western governments, although their original countries of origin are convoluted, and their loyalties/allegiances are dubious. These operatives are also traveling through damaged and war-torn countries on missions, and maybe counter-missions, while opportunistically pursuing personal profit. It might be the closest thing to a comedy Johnson has written, although there aren’t many belly laughs to be had. The New York Times picked the book as one of it’s 100 notable books for 2014 and described it as “cheerfully nihilistic.”

Book cover for Tree of Smoke by Denis JohnsonTwo of the main characters in “Tree of Smoke” are soldiers in the Vietnam War, the brothers Bill and James Houston. Bill Houston is also one of the central characters in Johnson’s first novel, “Angels.” Bill meets a wife running away with her two kids on a Greyhound bus. Together they bounce around the fringes of America through bus stations, bars and cheap motels. They encounter lots of dispossessed, strange and dangerous people. They inevitably get into trouble and make bad decisions, which get them into even more trouble. The book’s bleak subject matter could come off as exploitative in another author’s hands, but Johnson’s deft characterization and artful sentences make this story of marginal characters about something bigger than them. While it isn’t necessary to read “Angels” before reading “Tree of Smoke,” there is an added poignancy to reading about Bill Houston’s past when you already know his future.

The setting, time period and character types of Johnson’s stories can vary greatly from book to book, but there are shared characteristics within his body of work. Like most writers, he returns to certain themes and fascinations. You can see his interest in the spy genre in “The Laughing Monsters,” and “Tree of Smoke.” They are more like the spy stories of Graham Greene or John LeCarre than Ian Fleming, but the trappings of spycraft are there, as is the thrill of reading about it. He’s also a fan of crime, noir and hard-boiled fiction. (He adapted the Jim Thompson novel, “A Swell Looking Dame” for the screen.) His novel “Already Dead” is a complex noir about a descendant of a wealthy family who’s at risk of losing what remains of his fortune. After crossing a member of a drug syndicate, he’s on the run from two of his goons, including one who likes to punctuate punches to the face with quotes from Nietzsche.

While the protagonist in “Already Dead” might already be dead, the protagonist in “The Name of The World” is living a “posthumous life,” or so he has felt since his wife and child were killed in a car crash. An excellent addition to the genre I’m going to call “University Novels,” “The Name of The World” is about an academic in a small college town who finds himself forced to “act like somebody who cares what happens to him” despite his tentativeness about re-engaging with life. It is another short, poignant and beautifully written novel by Johnson.

Denis Johnson started his writing career as a poet. His first book of poetry was published when he was 19. I think this is the reason so many of his novels are short, but they never suffer for it. The books are as long as they need to be and crafted as precisely as his sentences. Sometimes he illuminates the emotional weight of his stories with language and images that are borderline hallucinogenic. There are always elements that surprise in his work and a consistency of quality, whether it’s short stories or plays, fiction or nonfiction. Despite some of his awards and critical acclaim, he remains an underappreciated writer in many ways. Just as he deserves the accolades he has received, he deserves to be read widely.

The post The Work of Denis Johnson appeared first on DBRL Next.

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Books for Dudes – Ultimate Comics: Spider-man, Volume 1

DBRLTeen - February 6, 2015

Miles as Spider-manThink you know Spider-man? Maybe you do, maybe you don’t! Peter Parker, Spider-man, debuted in Marvel Comics Amazing Fantasy #15 in 1962, and you can still read his adventures in comics, newspapers, and graphic novels today. In 2000, Marvel decided to create a separate, updated universe as if all its characters were created in modern day. Dubbed the Ultimate line, Ultimate Spider-man #1 premiered with a teenage Peter Parker being bitten by a genetically modified spider (as opposed to the radioactive one of the primary Marvel Universe).

After a successful run, Ultimate Spider-man writer Brian Michael Bendis decided to push differences between the regular and Ultimate Spider-man even further by killing off teenage Peter Parker. Right before his heroic death, a 13-year-old boy named Miles Morales gained powers similar to Peter Parker. Inspired by Peter’s heroic death fighting evil, Miles Morales became the new Spider-man in the Ultimate Universe. So, Marvel currently has two universes being published, with two different Spider-men. Grown-up Peter Parker is in the regular universe, Miles Morales is now Spider-man in the Ultimate universe. To get started on the ground floor of Mike Morales’ adventures, check out Ultimate Comics: Spider-man Volume 1

As readers get into the new Ultimate Comics: Spider-man series, we quickly find out that Miles has more differences than Peter besides just ethnicity. Due to the modified spider that bit Miles, he can become invisible, he can administer a venom sting, and his spider-sense doesn’t work quite as well as Peter’s. Miles also, at least initially, lacks Peter’s webs.

Volume 1

Initially skeptical of a non Peter Parker Spider-man, I quickly grew to enjoy Miles as a character. He has a great supporting cast, too. His best friend, Ganke, is an enthusiastic help as Miles deals with life’s complications to becoming a super hero. And for those who follow Marvel comics regularly, this summer’s “Secret Wars” sees a big event that ends both the regular and ultimate universes, with something new coming out of the event by the fall…something that may just have Miles Morales and adult Peter Parker in the same world. Marvel has already been quoted as saying Miles plays a large part of this big summer story which changes the Marvel landscape. Start reading now and catch up on this great series.

Originally published at Books for Dudes – Ultimate Comics: Spider-man, Volume 1.

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Books to Celebrate a Century of Black Life, History and Culture

DBRL Next - February 4, 2015

Book cover for Extraordinary Black Missourians by John A. Wright and Sylvia WrightFebruary is Black History Month, a time when we celebrate the contributions and accomplishments of African Americans in our nation’s history and our local communities. The Association for the Study of African American Life and History (ASALH) was founded in 1915 by Dr. Carter G. Woodson, and in celebration of this organization’s 100th anniversary, this year’s Black History Month theme is “A Century of Black Life, History and Culture.”

Perhaps no book illustrates how African Americans shaped the past 100 years better than  “The African-American Century” by Henry Louis Gates, Jr. and Cornel West. From authors to politicians, activists to artists, this book profiles the rich variety of black Americans’ contributions to this nation’s development.

Similarly grand in scope is “The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America’s Great Migration” by Pulitzer Prize-winner Isabel Wilkerson. This sweeping narrative follows the movement of black citizens, looking for a better life, from the South to cities in both the north and west over a period of more than 50 years.

Black America a Photographic JourneyBlack America: A Photographic Journey” by Marcia A. Smith surveys the black experience throughout the past century and earlier, using powerful visuals to accompany written narratives about the Civil War, Reconstruction, the Great Depression, the Harlem Renaissance, the civil rights movement and more.

Want to know more about black history in Missouri? Educator and writer John A. Wright, with the assistance of his wife Sylvia Wright, has published a number of books on the history of African Americans in Missouri, particularly in the St. Louis area. Their most recent book is “Extraordinary Black Missourians: Pioneers, Leaders, Performers, Athletes, and Other Notables Who’ve Made History.”  For more local history, check out Gary Kremer’s “Race and Meaning: The African American Experience in Missouri” and Rose Nolen’s “African Americans in Mid-Missouri: From Pioneers to Ragtimers.”

More resources from DBRL

  • Browse our Black Culture and History subject guide with links to library research databases and the best web links for learning about African Americans in Missouri and nationwide.
  • Discover our African-American History Online database (free with your library card) and find expansive and in-depth information – including primary source documents – on the people, events and topics important to the study of African-American history.

The post Books to Celebrate a Century of Black Life, History and Culture appeared first on DBRL Next.

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FAFSA Frenzy Sessions Begin This Month

DBRLTeen - February 2, 2015

Scrabble MoneyWhat is the FAFSA and why is it important?

F-A-F-S-A. Commit these five letters to memory. If you plan on attending college, they will follow you throughout the course of your entire academic career.

FAFSA stands for Free Application for Federal Student Aid. All prospective college students looking to qualify for federal grants or loans must complete this online application. Most colleges also require this application so that they can award institutional scholarships based on financial need.

Another important note: Once you are admitted and attending college, you will have to complete this form every year until you graduate. Typically the latest version of the FAFSA form is available in early January, or shortly before.

Of all the applications you submit, your FAFSA ranks right up there with your application to the college or university you have chosen to attend. Translation: Very Important. You have through early spring to complete this online form, though deadlines vary by state. Be sure to review the 2015 FAFSA deadlines.

The Missouri Department of Higher Education has an assistance program called FAFSA Frenzy to help you and your family successfully complete this online application form. They will be hosting several free events at mid-Missouri high schools. If you are planning to attend college in the fall, mark your calendars now for one of these four sessions. 

Best all, FAFSA Frenzy attendees are entered for a chance to win a scholarship to a Missouri postsecondary institution for the Fall 2015 semester!

Where are FAFSA Frenzy events being held in Boone & Callaway counties?

Location: Address: Date & Time: Fulton High School 1 Hornet Dr., Fulton Tuesday, February 3 from 4:30-7 p.m. Battle High School 7575 St. Charles Road, Columbia Tuesday, February 10 from 6-8 p.m. Hickman High School 1104 N. Providence Rd., Columbia Wednesday, February 18 from 5-7:00 p.m. Columbia Area Career Center 4203 S. Providence Rd. Sunday, February 22 from 2-4 p.m.

What to bring:

  • Your parents’ and your 2014 W-2 forms
  • Copies of your parents’ and your 2014 tax forms, if they are ready.
  • Student PIN and parent PIN. You may apply for your PINs at www.pin.ed.gov before attending a FAFSA Frenzy event.

If you or your parents have not yet filed your 2014 tax returns, be sure to bring any statements of interest earned in 2014, any 1099 forms and any other forms required to complete your taxes.

Originally published at FAFSA Frenzy Sessions Begin This Month.

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Top Ten Books Librarians Love: The February 2015 List

Next Book Buzz - February 2, 2015

Library Reads LogoThis month’s LibraryReads list definitely has something for every reading taste (just like the library itself)! The list of books publishing in February that librarians across the country recommend includes an entertaining historical fiction set in Hollywood during filming of “Gone With the Wind,” as well as a Regency romance, fantasy and plenty of mysteries to keep you and your cup of tea company. Top of the list is the latest penetrating look at a family’s inner life from Anne Tyler. Enjoy this month’s selections!

Book cover for A Spool of Blue Thread by Anne TylerA Spool of Blue Thread” by Anne Tyler
“In this book, we come to know three generations of Whitshanks — a family with secrets and memories that are sometimes different than what others observe. The book’s timeline moves back and forth with overlapping stories, just like thread on a spool. Most readers will find themselves in the story. Once again, Tyler has written an enchanting tale.”
- Catherine Coyne, Mansfield Public Library, Mansfield, MA

Book cover for A Touch of Stardust by Kate AlcottA Touch of Stardust” by Kate Alcott
“With the background of the making of ‘Gone with the Wind,’ this is a delightful read that combines historical events with the fictional career of an aspiring screenwriter. Julie is a wide-eyed Indiana girl who, through a series of lucky breaks, advances from studio go-fer and assistant to Carole Lombard to contract writer at MGM. A fun, engaging page-turner!”
- Lois Gross, Hoboken Public Library, Hoboken, NJ

Book cover for My Sunshine AwayMy Sunshine Away” by M.O. Walsh
“A crime against a 15-year-old girl is examined through the eyes of one of her friends — a friend who admits to being a possible suspect in the crime. This is a wonderful debut novel full of suspense, angst, loyalty, deceit and, most of all, love.”
- Alison Nadvornik, Worthington Libraries, Columbus, OH

And here is the rest of the list with links to these on-order books in our catalog.

Happy reading!

The post Top Ten Books Librarians Love: The February 2015 List appeared first on DBRL Next.

Categories: Book Buzz

Top Ten Books Librarians Love: The February 2015 List

DBRL Next - February 2, 2015

Library Reads LogoThis month’s LibraryReads list definitely has something for every reading taste (just like the library itself)! The list of books publishing in February that librarians across the country recommend includes an entertaining historical fiction set in Hollywood during filming of “Gone With the Wind,” as well as a Regency romance, fantasy and plenty of mysteries to keep you and your cup of tea company. Top of the list is the latest penetrating look at a family’s inner life from Anne Tyler. Enjoy this month’s selections!

Book cover for A Spool of Blue Thread by Anne TylerA Spool of Blue Thread” by Anne Tyler
“In this book, we come to know three generations of Whitshanks — a family with secrets and memories that are sometimes different than what others observe. The book’s timeline moves back and forth with overlapping stories, just like thread on a spool. Most readers will find themselves in the story. Once again, Tyler has written an enchanting tale.”
- Catherine Coyne, Mansfield Public Library, Mansfield, MA

Book cover for A Touch of Stardust by Kate AlcottA Touch of Stardust” by Kate Alcott
“With the background of the making of ‘Gone with the Wind,’ this is a delightful read that combines historical events with the fictional career of an aspiring screenwriter. Julie is a wide-eyed Indiana girl who, through a series of lucky breaks, advances from studio go-fer and assistant to Carole Lombard to contract writer at MGM. A fun, engaging page-turner!”
- Lois Gross, Hoboken Public Library, Hoboken, NJ

Book cover for My Sunshine AwayMy Sunshine Away” by M.O. Walsh
“A crime against a 15-year-old girl is examined through the eyes of one of her friends — a friend who admits to being a possible suspect in the crime. This is a wonderful debut novel full of suspense, angst, loyalty, deceit and, most of all, love.”
- Alison Nadvornik, Worthington Libraries, Columbus, OH

And here is the rest of the list with links to these on-order books in our catalog.

Happy reading!

The post Top Ten Books Librarians Love: The February 2015 List appeared first on DBRL Next.

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How Do You Brew? All About Tea

DBRL Next - January 30, 2015

Photo of tea cups by Naama ym via FlickrMy tea drinking habit goes way back. I recall developing a tea drinking routine as a university undergraduate.  Tea was cheaper than coffee (which I adored). At that time, I was pinching every single penny, so that might be the reason for my pronounced commitment to the way of tea. I’m hardly alone in my predilection — worldwide, tea is the most consumed beverage after water.

Although the tea plant originated in ancient China, over the centuries it traveled around the globe, leaving a rich historical trail, and it is now cultivated on five continents. It derives from the evergreen tree Camellia sinensis, and only the leaves of the plant are used in making the beverage. All tea starts as freshly plucked leaves, but it is transformed into six classes depending on manufacturing processes, which yield either green, yellow, white, oolong, black or Pu-erh style tea, each with a distinctive taste and appearance. It’s possible to become quite a connoisseur of this aromatic plant, given the varieties and diverse terroirs of its evergreen leaves.

Photo of tea by Gloria Garcia via FlickrTea is soothing; tea is invigorating. Served hot, it can warm you on a cold day, or it can quench your thirst and cool you down when served iced on a hot day. Either way, it’s hard to deny the joy its flavor and caffeine infusion can bring. In fact, I’ve claimed strong black tea dosed with heavy cream to be my first line of defense in fending off the blues. In order to enjoy a cup of tea to its utmost, it is important to brew it correctly. Here are the basic instructions, but know that depending on the class of tea, the brewing instructions can be tweaked to enhance the outcome. Is it possible to brew a bad cup of tea? You bet! The worst cup of tea I ever had was served in a tavern where the server ran lukewarm tap water into the mug with a tea bag and delivered it to me. It was undrinkable and truly a disappointment on that cold and clammy day.

Your favorite tea can change over time. (And so can your favorite teacup and teapot — I’ve broken many!) Earl Gray, a black tea flavored with oil of bergamot, was my first favorite. Later, I went on a serious binge of drinking mango-scented black tea, complete with little pale orange mango blossoms in the mix. Nowadays, my preference is English Breakfast, a blend containing a few types of black tea. It has a rich, full-bodied, robust flavor that calls me back again, day after day and year after year.

Photo of macaronsThe British have a deep appreciation for tea, and the wealthy classes developed a formal ritual of “afternoon tea” that dates back to the 1800s. It was a light meal usually eaten between 4 and 6 p.m., and it began as a means to stave off hunger until the evening meal (which could be 8 p.m. or later). Along with cups of tea with milk and sugar added, small sandwiches, cakes and pastries were served. In modern times, most folks are working at this time of day, so this formal tea meal is reserved as a treat for those visiting fancy tea houses or hotels, or as a way to celebrate a special occasion. Still, taking a less formal afternoon tea break with a little confection is a deeply embedded cultural habit, and this little batch of books attests to that fact.

With the winter dark bearing down, I’ve decided it’s time to have an afternoon tea party chez moi. I’ll invite my girlfriends, and we will visit over our cups of hot tea served with sweets and savories. Then we will retire to the living room where we will read aloud to each other our favorite inspirational poems and enhance the boost from the tea and camaraderie. Ahhhh…

 

Photo Credits:
Tea cups by naama via photopin cc
Tea by Gloria García via photopin cc
Macarons by ajagendorf25 via photopin cc

The post How Do You Brew? All About Tea appeared first on DBRL Next.

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New DVDs: “The Roosevelts”

Center Aisle Cinema - December 1, 2014

roosevelts

We recently added “The Roosevelts” to the DBRL collection. The seven episode series played on PBS earlier this year, and is the latest from documentary filmmaker Ken Burns who has done other series such as “The Civil War,” “Baseball,” “Jazz,” “The War,” “The National Parks,” and “Prohibition.” Here’s a synopsis from our catalog:

Profiles Theodore, Franklin, and Eleanor Roosevelt, three members of the most prominent and influential family in American politics. It is the first time in a major documentary television series that their individual stories have been interwoven into a single narrative. This seven-part, 14 hour film follows the Roosevelts for more than a century, from Theodore’s birth in 1858 to Eleanor’s death in 1962. Over the course of these years, Theodore would become the 26th President of the United States and his beloved niece, Eleanor, would marry his fifth cousin, Franklin, who became the 32nd President of the United States. Together, these three individuals not only redefined the relationship Americans had with their government and with each other, but also redefined the role of the United States within the wider world. The series encompasses the history the Roosevelts helped to shape: the creation of the National Parks, the digging of the Panama Canal, the passage of innovative New Deal programs, the defeat of Hitler, and the postwar struggles for civil rights at home and human rights abroad. It is also an intimate human story about love, betrayal, family loyalty, personal courage, and the conquest of fear.

Check out the film trailer or the official film site for more info.

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Docs Around Town: Nov. 28– Dec. 4

Center Aisle Cinema - November 26, 2014

wattstaxDecember 3: Troublemakers” 6:00 p.m. at Ragtag, free. (via)
December 4: Wattstax” 6:00 p.m. at Ragtag, free. (via)

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New DVD: “Six by Sondheim”

Center Aisle Cinema - November 24, 2014

sixbysondheim

We recently added “Six by Sondheim” to the DBRL collection. The film was shown last year on HBO and currently has a rating of 100% from critics at Rotten Tomatoes. Here’s a synopsis from our catalog:

An intimate and candid look at the life and art of legendary composer-lyricist Stephen Sondheim, as revealed through the creation and performance of six of his songs, and remembered by the man himself. The six songs featured in the film are: Something’s coming, Opening doors, Send in the clowns, I’m still here, Being alive and Sunday. Art and life are intertwined for Sondheim, and it is a story of both.

Check out the film trailer or the official film site for more info.

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New DVD: “Tim’s Vermeer”

Center Aisle Cinema - November 17, 2014

timsvermeerWe recently added “Tim’s Vermeer” to the DBRL collection. This film played at the True/False Film Festival in 2014, and currently has a rating of 89% from critics at Rotten Tomatoes. Here’s a synopsis from our catalog:

Tim Jenison, a Texas-based inventor, attempts to solve one of the greatest mysteries in all art: How did seventeenth century Dutch Master Johannes Vermeer manage to paint so photo-realistically, 150 years before the invention of photography? Spanning ten years, his adventure takes him to Delft, Holland, where Vermeer painted his masterpieces, to the north coast of Yorkshire to meet artist David Hockney, and even to Buckingham Palace to see a Vermeer masterpiece in the collection of the Queen.

Check out the film trailer or the official film site for more info.

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Docs Around Town: Nov. 14 – Nov. 20

Center Aisle Cinema - November 13, 2014

perfectvictimNovember 18: Perfect Victim” 6:00 p.m. at Ragtag, free/donation. (via)

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“Rich Hill” on January 14th

Center Aisle Cinema - November 12, 2014

richhill-coverWednesday, January 14, 2015 • 6:30 p.m.
Columbia Public Library, Friends Room

The film “Rich Hill” (91 min.) examines the rural community of the same name that lies seventy miles south of Kansas City, Missouri. This impoverished Midwestern town is the setting for this documentary that examines the turbulent lives of three boys and the fragile family bonds that sustain them. Directed by Tracy Droz Tragos and Andrew Droz Palermo, this film was a selection of the 2014 True/False Film Festival and won the Grand Jury Prize for Best Documentary at the 2014 Sundance Film Festival.

Rich Hill – Theatrical Trailer from Andrew Droz Palermo on Vimeo.

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New DVD: “Jodorowsky’s Dune”

Center Aisle Cinema - November 10, 2014

jodorowskysduneWe recently added “Jodorowsky’s Dune” to the DBRL collection. This film played at the True/False Film Festival in 2014, and currently has a rating of 98% from critics at Rotten Tomatoes. Here’s a synopsis from the film website:

This fascinating documentary explores the genesis of one of cinema’s greatest epics that never was: cult filmmaker Alejandro Jodorowsky’s (EL TOPO) adaptation of Frank Herbert’s sci-fi classic Dune, whose cast would have included such icons as Salvador Dali, Orson Welles and Mick Jagger. In 1975, following the runaway success of his art-house freak-outs EL TOPO and HOLY MOUNTAIN, Alejandro Jodorowsky secured the rights to Frank Herbert’s Dune – and began work on what was gearing up to be a cinematic game-changer, a sci-fi epic unlike anything the world had ever seen.

Check out the film trailer or the official film site for more info.

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Docs Around Town: Nov. 7 – Nov. 13

Center Aisle Cinema - November 6, 2014

hornetsnest

November 10: “The Hornet’s Nest” 5:00 p.m. & 7:00 p.m. at  Forum 8. (via)
November 11: 
Bag It” 6:00 p.m. at Ragtag, free. (via)
November 13: Tiny” 7:00 p.m. at the MU Student Center, free. (via)

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New DVD: “Finding Vivian Maier”

Center Aisle Cinema - November 3, 2014

findingvivianmaierWe recently added “Finding Vivian Maier” to the DBRL collection. The film was shown earlier this year at Ragtag Cinema and currently has a rating of 95% from critics at Rotten Tomatoes. Here’s a synopsis from our catalog:

Now considered one of the 20th century’s greatest street photographers, Vivian Maier was a mysterious nanny who secretly took over 100,000 photographs that went unseen during her lifetime. Vivian’s strange and riveting life and art are revealed through never-before-seen photos, films, and interviews with dozens who thought they knew her.

Check out the film trailer or the official film site for more info.

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Docs Around Town: Oct. 31 – Nov. 6

Center Aisle Cinema - October 30, 2014

girl_rising

October 31: Citizen Four” starts at Ragtag. (via)
November 3: “20,000 Days on Earth” 5:00 p.m. & 7:00 p.m. at  Forum 8. (via)
November 3:  “Girl Rising” 6:00 p.m. at Missouri Theatre. (via)
November 3: Wonder Women! The Untold Story of American Superheroines” 6:00 p.m. at the MU Student Center. (via)

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New DVD: “Valentine Road”

Center Aisle Cinema - October 27, 2014

valentineroadWe recently added “Valentine Road” to the DBRL collection. The film was shown last year on HBO and currently has a rating of 90% from critics at Rotten Tomatoes. Here’s a synopsis from the film website:

In 2008, eighth-grader Brandon McInerney shot classmate Larry King at point blank range. Unraveling this tragedy from point of impact, the film reveals the heartbreaking circumstances that led to the shocking crime as well as the aftermath.

Check out the film trailer or the official film site for more info.

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Docs Around Town: Oct. 24 – Oct. 30

Center Aisle Cinema - October 23, 2014

mistakenforstrangers

October 27: “Mistaken for Strangers” 5:00 p.m. & 7:00 p.m. at  Forum 8. (via)
October 28: One Day Pina Asked…” 6:00 p.m. at Ragtag, free. (via)

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“American Revolutionary” on November 12th

Center Aisle Cinema - October 22, 2014

americanrevolutionary

Wednesday, November 12, 2014 • 6:30 p.m.
Columbia Public Library, Friends Room

The documentary “American Revolutionary: The Evolution of Grace Lee Boggs” (82 min.) is the latest from Columbia-native filmmaker Grace Lee (“The Grace Lee Project“). This film focuses on Grace Lee Boggs, a 98 year old Chinese American philosopher, writer, and activist in Detroit with a thick FBI file and a surprising vision of what an American revolution can be. In this film we see how Boggs continually challenges a new generation to throw off old assumptions, think creatively and redefine revolution for our times. The screening is a collaboration with POV, PBS’ award-winning nonfiction film series.

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