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Project Teen: Tremendous T-shirt Art

DBRLTeen - July 8, 2015

Batman's ToolbeltProject Teen: Tremendous T-shirt Art
Bring some old t-shirts and redesign them into something super! We’ll work with bleach and paint, so dress accordingly. There will be free pizza. Ages 12-18.

Columbia Public Library
Monday, July 20 at 1 p.m.
Registration required.
To sign up, call (573) 443-3161. Southern Boone County Public Library
Thursday, July 23 at noon.
No registration required.

Photo by Flickr User Reclamation Revolution. Used under Creative Commons license.

Originally published at Project Teen: Tremendous T-shirt Art.

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Reader Review: One Plus One

DBRL Next - July 7, 2015

one plus oneOne Plus One” is about life – real life. About how people struggle to make ends meet and will do anything for their family. All this determination and desperation to survive can change a person – makes you stop living life.

I loved this book because the characters were so relatable to what is going on in families across the country every day. However, despite these hard times and a whole lot of negativity, some beauty can truly emerge. It’s a beautiful story.

Three words that describe this book: relatable, heartbreaking, strong

You might want to pick this book up if: You are looking for a great summer read. A true story that everyone can relate to at one point in their life or another. The depiction of a single mother just trying to get by is very accurate and profound.

-Amanda

The post Reader Review: One Plus One appeared first on DBRL Next.

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Third Summer Reading Gift Card Winner Announced

DBRL Next - July 6, 2015

TrophyCongratulations to Margie M., a Callaway County Public Library patron, for winning our third Adult Summer Reading prize drawing.  She is the recipient of a $25 Well Read Books gift card.

All it takes to be entered into our weekly drawings is to sign up for Adult Summer Reading. You can do this at any of our branch locations or Bookmobile stops or register online.  Also, don’t forget that submitting book reviews increases your chances of winning.  There are plenty of chances left to win this summer, so keep those reviews coming.

The post Third Summer Reading Gift Card Winner Announced appeared first on DBRL Next.

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2015 Audie Award Winners

Next Book Buzz - July 6, 2015

Audiobook of Neil Gaiman's The Graveyard BookJust in time for all of your summer road trips, on May 28 the Audio Publishers Association (APA) announced the winners of its 2015 Audie Awards competition, honoring spoken word entertainment. The top prize – audiobook of the year – went to “Mandela: An Audio History” by Nelson Mandela and narrated by Desmond Tutu, Nelson Mandela and Joe Richman. Here are some of the other award winners available for check-out from your library.

Distinguished Achievement in Production
Neil Gaiman’s full-cast production of “The Graveyard Book
While this book for young readers was originally published in 2008, this new recording by a group of British all-stars brings Gaiman’s dark tale delightfully to life. Nobody Owens, known to his friends as Bod, is a normal boy. He would be completely normal if he didn’t live in a sprawling graveyard, being raised and educated by ghosts, with a solitary guardian who belongs to neither the world of the living nor of the dead.

Alan Cumming's audiobook Not My Father's SonAutobiography/Memoir
Not My Father’s Son” by Alan Cumming (narrated by the author)
In his unique and engaging voice, the acclaimed actor of stage and screen shares the emotional story of his complicated relationship with his father and the deeply buried family secrets that shaped his life and career.

Fiction
All the Light We Cannot See” by Anthony Doerr (narrated by Zach Appelman)
Marie Laure lives with her father in Paris and is blind by age 6. Her father builds her a model of their neighborhood, so she can memorize it and navigate the real streets. When the Germans occupy Paris, they flee to Saint-Malo on the coast. In Germany, Werner grows up enchanted by a crude radio he finds. He becomes a master at building and fixing radios, which wins him a place with the Hitler Youth. Werner travels throughout Europe during the war, and finally to Saint-Malo, where his story and Marie Laure’s inevitably converge.

Doris Kearns Goodwin's The Bully PulpitHistory/Biography
The Bully Pulpit: Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, and the Golden Age of Journalism” by Doris Kearns Goodwin (narrated by Edward Herrmann)
Goodwin describes the broken friendship between Teddy Roosevelt and his chosen successor, William Howard Taft. With the help of the ‘muckraking’ press Roosevelt had wielded the Bully Pulpit to challenge and triumph over abusive monopolies, political bosses, and corrupting money brokers. Roosevelt led a revolution that he bequeathed to Taft only to see it compromised as Taft surrendered to money men and big business.

Mystery
Silkworm” by Robert Galbraith (Read by Robert Glenister)

This is J.K. Rowling’s second mystery novel written under the pen name of Robert Galbraith. The fast-paced narrative focuses on a missing novelist, Owen Quine, and private detective Cormoran Strike. Quine has just completed a manuscript featuring poisonous pen-portraits of almost everyone he knows. If the novel were to be published, it would ruin lives. That means that there are a lot of people who might want him silenced.

Nonfiction
Furious Cool: Richard Pryor and the World That Made Him” by David Henry and Joe Henry (narrated by Dion Graham)
David and Joe Henry bring Richard Pryor to life both as a man and as an artist, providing an in-depth appreciation of his talent and his lasting influence, as well as an insightful examination of the world he lived in and the influences that shaped both his persona and his art.

Find the full list of this and past years’ winners at the Audio Publishers Association’s website. What audiobooks are you listening to and loving this summer?

The post 2015 Audie Award Winners appeared first on DBRL Next.

Categories: Book Buzz

2015 Audie Award Winners

DBRL Next - July 6, 2015

Audiobook of Neil Gaiman's The Graveyard BookJust in time for all of your summer road trips, on May 28 the Audio Publishers Association (APA) announced the winners of its 2015 Audie Awards competition, honoring spoken word entertainment. The top prize – audiobook of the year – went to “Mandela: An Audio History” by Nelson Mandela and narrated by Desmond Tutu, Nelson Mandela and Joe Richman. Here are some of the other award winners available for check-out from your library.

Distinguished Achievement in Production
Neil Gaiman’s full-cast production of “The Graveyard Book
While this book for young readers was originally published in 2008, this new recording by a group of British all-stars brings Gaiman’s dark tale delightfully to life. Nobody Owens, known to his friends as Bod, is a normal boy. He would be completely normal if he didn’t live in a sprawling graveyard, being raised and educated by ghosts, with a solitary guardian who belongs to neither the world of the living nor of the dead.

Alan Cumming's audiobook Not My Father's SonAutobiography/Memoir
Not My Father’s Son” by Alan Cumming (narrated by the author)
In his unique and engaging voice, the acclaimed actor of stage and screen shares the emotional story of his complicated relationship with his father and the deeply buried family secrets that shaped his life and career.

Fiction
All the Light We Cannot See” by Anthony Doerr (narrated by Zach Appelman)
Marie Laure lives with her father in Paris and is blind by age 6. Her father builds her a model of their neighborhood, so she can memorize it and navigate the real streets. When the Germans occupy Paris, they flee to Saint-Malo on the coast. In Germany, Werner grows up enchanted by a crude radio he finds. He becomes a master at building and fixing radios, which wins him a place with the Hitler Youth. Werner travels throughout Europe during the war, and finally to Saint-Malo, where his story and Marie Laure’s inevitably converge.

Doris Kearns Goodwin's The Bully PulpitHistory/Biography
The Bully Pulpit: Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, and the Golden Age of Journalism” by Doris Kearns Goodwin (narrated by Edward Herrmann)
Goodwin describes the broken friendship between Teddy Roosevelt and his chosen successor, William Howard Taft. With the help of the ‘muckraking’ press Roosevelt had wielded the Bully Pulpit to challenge and triumph over abusive monopolies, political bosses, and corrupting money brokers. Roosevelt led a revolution that he bequeathed to Taft only to see it compromised as Taft surrendered to money men and big business.

Mystery
Silkworm” by Robert Galbraith (Read by Robert Glenister)

This is J.K. Rowling’s second mystery novel written under the pen name of Robert Galbraith. The fast-paced narrative focuses on a missing novelist, Owen Quine, and private detective Cormoran Strike. Quine has just completed a manuscript featuring poisonous pen-portraits of almost everyone he knows. If the novel were to be published, it would ruin lives. That means that there are a lot of people who might want him silenced.

Nonfiction
Furious Cool: Richard Pryor and the World That Made Him” by David Henry and Joe Henry (narrated by Dion Graham)
David and Joe Henry bring Richard Pryor to life both as a man and as an artist, providing an in-depth appreciation of his talent and his lasting influence, as well as an insightful examination of the world he lived in and the influences that shaped both his persona and his art.

Find the full list of this and past years’ winners at the Audio Publishers Association’s website. What audiobooks are you listening to and loving this summer?

The post 2015 Audie Award Winners appeared first on DBRL Next.

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Reminder for Summer Reading Finishers

DBRLTeen - July 6, 2015

KindleAs part of the Teen Summer Reading Challenge, we have asked area young adults to read for 20 hours, share three book reviews and complete seven fun library-related activities. Beginning Monday, July 6, Summer Reading finishers can visit any of our three library branches or bookmobile stops and claim their free book. We will have a wide selection of juvenile and young adult titles for you to choose from.

Best of all, if you finish, your name will also be entered into a drawing for a free Kindle E-reader (black and white)! This program is ongoing through August 15, so there is still several weeks of good reading time left.

Originally published at Reminder for Summer Reading Finishers.

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Online Genealogy Resources From Your Library

DBRL Next - July 3, 2015

HeritageQuest-newGenealogical research is becoming more and more popular with our patrons – have you caught the bug? Here at DBRL Next, we will continue to share news and resources that might help you in your search of your family’s heritage, resources like the online databases Heritage Quest and Ancestry Library Edition. The coolest part about these two databases is that they are FREE if you have a current library card with us!

While Heritage Quest can be accessed wherever you are, Ancestry Library Edition can only be accessed at one of our three branch facilities (Columbia, Fulton, Ashland) due to licensing restrictions. Another tip you might not be aware of is that on the third floor of the Columbia Public Library is a computer set aside strictly for research using the library’s databases that you can access for more than an hour at a time.

At www.dbrl.org you’ll find these databases in the menu of items under “research.” Click on the genealogy category and choose Ancestry (within the library only) or Heritage Quest and you are well on your way! From home you will be required to enter your library card number, but within a library building, whether you are using one of our computers or are on your own laptop connected to DBRL’s Wi-Fi, this step isn’t required.

At least once a quarter I give a presentation on these two databases in the Friends Room of the Columbia Public Library. Many months of the year I host a “Genealogy Help” drop-in class where you can come and sit at a computer and ask questions about your research. I’ll give pointers on other databases or sources you can use to further your family tree! As a rule, always check in the index of the quarterly program guide under “Genealogy” or search our online program guide to see when the next program will be. Happy Hunting!

The post Online Genealogy Resources From Your Library appeared first on DBRL Next.

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Reader Reviews: What Alice Forgot

DBRL Next - July 2, 2015

Book cover for What Alice ForgotIn “What Alice Forgot,” Alice Love wakes up on the gym floor after falling off her bike in Spinning Class. She thinks she’s 29 and it’s 1998. But it’s not. It is 2008 and she is almost 40. She discovers she has three children, she and her husband are getting divorced, and her relationships with people she once loved have become strained. The book was funny, touching and thought-provoking. Alice wonders who this driven, grouchy, super-busy woman she’s become is, and she wonders how she got that way. Readers will definitely look at their own lives during this book, wondering if they are putting the important things first.

Two words that describe this book: funny, love story

You might want to pick this book up if: you want a light summer read that makes you laugh out loud but also think and reflect on your own life and where it now is.

-Anonymous

The post Reader Reviews: What Alice Forgot appeared first on DBRL Next.

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Three Great American Novels for Your Fourth of July

Next Book Buzz - July 1, 2015

Book cover for Freedom by Jonathan FranzenThe label “Great American Novel” is often applied to a book that captures something essential about American culture and its people, a story grounded in and informed by the American experience. Others use the term to identify a work as the best representative of the kind of literature being written in America during a particular time period. And of course, a great many other readers and critics dismiss the idea of any book being able to capture the diverse experiences and realities of all Americans. Whatever your opinion, this July 4th you can celebrate our nation’s independence with these books that – if the honorific were actually to be awarded – could be contenders for the title of Great American Novel.

Freedom” by Johnathan Franzen
The Berglunds, the suburban family at the center of this book, appear perfect on the outside, but looks are deceiving. The story follows them through the last decades of the twentieth century and concludes near the beginning of the Obama administration. Their lives begin to unravel when their son moves in with aggressive Republican neighbors, green lawyer Walter takes a job in the coal industry and go-getter Patty becomes increasingly unstable and enraged. Desire, entitlement, marriage, family – Franzen plumbs these and many other weighty topics in this study of middle class American life.

Book cover for Gilead by Marilynne RobinsonGilead” by Marilyn Robinson
This lyrical and thoughtful novel takes the form of a letter from the dying Reverend John Ames to his son, revealing Ames’ deep reverence for his life, his work and this country. He chronicles three previous generations of his family, including a fiery abolitionist grandfather and pacifist father, both also men of faith. The story stretches back to the Civil War, reveals uncomfortable family secrets and examines the bond between fathers and sons.

To Kill a Mockingbird” by Harper Lee
First published in 1960, the racial injustice described in this novel unfortunately has strong echoes in today’s America. Scout Finch, daughter of the town lawyer, likes to spend her summers building tree houses, swimming and catching lightning bugs with her big brother Jem. But one summer, when a black man is accused of raping a white woman and her father defends the man in the courtroom, Scout’s carefree days come to an end. She joins her father in a desperate battle against ignorance and prejudice in their small Alabama town.

What books do you recommend as stories that uniquely capture the American experience? Toni Morrison’s “Beloved“? F. Scott Fitzgerald’s “The Great Gatsby“? Let us know in the comments.

The post Three Great American Novels for Your Fourth of July appeared first on DBRL Next.

Categories: Book Buzz

Three Great American Novels for Your Fourth of July

DBRL Next - July 1, 2015

Book cover for Freedom by Jonathan FranzenThe label “Great American Novel” is often applied to a book that captures something essential about American culture and its people, a story grounded in and informed by the American experience. Others use the term to identify a work as the best representative of the kind of literature being written in America during a particular time period. And of course, a great many other readers and critics dismiss the idea of any book being able to capture the diverse experiences and realities of all Americans. Whatever your opinion, this July 4th you can celebrate our nation’s independence with these books that – if the honorific were actually to be awarded – could be contenders for the title of Great American Novel.

Freedom” by Johnathan Franzen
The Berglunds, the suburban family at the center of this book, appear perfect on the outside, but looks are deceiving. The story follows them through the last decades of the twentieth century and concludes near the beginning of the Obama administration. Their lives begin to unravel when their son moves in with aggressive Republican neighbors, green lawyer Walter takes a job in the coal industry and go-getter Patty becomes increasingly unstable and enraged. Desire, entitlement, marriage, family – Franzen plumbs these and many other weighty topics in this study of middle class American life.

Book cover for Gilead by Marilynne RobinsonGilead” by Marilyn Robinson
This lyrical and thoughtful novel takes the form of a letter from the dying Reverend John Ames to his son, revealing Ames’ deep reverence for his life, his work and this country. He chronicles three previous generations of his family, including a fiery abolitionist grandfather and pacifist father, both also men of faith. The story stretches back to the Civil War, reveals uncomfortable family secrets and examines the bond between fathers and sons.

To Kill a Mockingbird” by Harper Lee
First published in 1960, the racial injustice described in this novel unfortunately has strong echoes in today’s America. Scout Finch, daughter of the town lawyer, likes to spend her summers building tree houses, swimming and catching lightning bugs with her big brother Jem. But one summer, when a black man is accused of raping a white woman and her father defends the man in the courtroom, Scout’s carefree days come to an end. She joins her father in a desperate battle against ignorance and prejudice in their small Alabama town.

What books do you recommend as stories that uniquely capture the American experience? Toni Morrison’s “Beloved“? F. Scott Fitzgerald’s “The Great Gatsby“? Let us know in the comments.

The post Three Great American Novels for Your Fourth of July appeared first on DBRL Next.

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Reader Review: Pioneer Girl

DBRL Next - June 30, 2015

Book cover for Pioneer Girl by Laura Ingalls WilderPioneer Girl,” the seed book for the Little House Laura Ingalls Wilder books, is a much faster read than you think it will be, given the size of the book. Unless, of course, you’re a footnote reader, and then all bets are off. I read most (though not all) of the introductory material, but what I was really interested in were Laura’s words. The early parts were very familiar; the older she got, the more I realized I never read the later books in the series. I loved, loved, loved reading her story of Almanzo. Laura was quite the spitfire. Reading about the long winter, the tornadoes and the frankly scary situations she found herself in (a man leaning over her bed telling her to lie still?) added a huge amount of depth to my understanding of who this woman really was and what her life was like as a woman in pioneer days. About some things I wished she’d gone into a lot more detail; she alluded to things that were very tantalizing, but I suppose that’s too much to ask of someone who grew up in the 19th century.

Three words that describe this book: fascinating, historical, feminism

You might want to pick this book up if: You read Laura Ingalls Wilder as a child and would like to know what else she chose not to share.

-Kathleen

The post Reader Review: Pioneer Girl appeared first on DBRL Next.

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Heroic Women of Historical Fiction

Next Book Buzz - June 29, 2015

book cover for The All-True Travels and Adventures of Lidie NewtonThis summer we’re exploring heroes, from crime-fighting superheroes to everyday folks just making a difference in their communities. Heroes can also be found within the pages of great literature. Historical fiction, which often chronicles the imagined experiences of real-life events, is a genre that is especially filled with heroes. I will admit I’m partial to stories of women in these historical settings. I know my own life is very different than those of the women who came before me. In fact, the life I lead has been very much shaped by those brave women from earlier centuries. The heroic women of historical fiction provide a glimpse into the challenges women of the past faced and how their bravery shaped today’s world. Here are a few of my favorite historical novels featuring strong women.

The years before the Civil War were tumultuous, especially in the Kansas Territory where abolitionists struggled to gain a stronghold and help the state enter the Union as a free state. Jane Smiley’s “The All-True Travels and Adventures of Lidie Newton,” features a Midwestern young woman who finds herself thrust into the upheaval of “Bleeding Kansas.” Lidie heads out to the territory with her abolitionist husband and (to be frank) completely unrealistic expectations of what the Kansas prairie will be like.  The story, filled with Lidie’s dry wit, is at times laugh-out-loud funny, and at others is quite sobering in its portrayal of the horror of slavery and violence of those years. I think Missouri residents will find this read especially interesting given all the Missouri locales that Lidie visits during her travels.

Book cover for Shanghai Girls by Lisa SeeThe experience of Chinese immigrants in WWII-era Los Angeles features in Lisa See’s “Shanghai Girls.” Pearl and May are sisters living exciting lives as models in glamorous Shanghai. When WWII breaks out, they find themselves in arranged marriages to sons of a Chinese-American merchant. Pearl and May are forced to leave China for the United States, landing first in the Angel Island Chinese immigration station and then in Los Angeles’ Chinatown. The sisters, bearing the weight of their own painful secrets, struggle to adjust to life under a domineering father-in-law and a society that is highly prejudicial against Asian-Americans. See’s novel, based in part on her own family’s experiences, provides a captivating look at the immigrant experience in this country.

Book cover for Year of WondersA small town’s struggle to survive during the Plague is chronicled in Geraldine Brooks’ “Year of Wonders.” The story is based on actual events — a small Derbyshire town called the village of Eyam quarantined itself in 1666 in order to prevent the plague from spreading further. Anna, a young maid, finds herself tasked with learning herbal remedies and midwifery when her village is overcome by the devastating disease. She becomes an important healer but faces many challenges, including the superstitions of the very people she is working to save. The novel is a beautifully written journey of self-discovery as Anna realizes strength and determination she did not know she possessed.

Happy reading!

The post Heroic Women of Historical Fiction appeared first on DBRL Next.

Categories: Book Buzz

Heroic Women of Historical Fiction

DBRL Next - June 29, 2015

book cover for The All-True Travels and Adventures of Lidie NewtonThis summer we’re exploring heroes, from crime-fighting superheroes to everyday folks just making a difference in their communities. Heroes can also be found within the pages of great literature. Historical fiction, which often chronicles the imagined experiences of real-life events, is a genre that is especially filled with heroes. I will admit I’m partial to stories of women in these historical settings. I know my own life is very different than those of the women who came before me. In fact, the life I lead has been very much shaped by those brave women from earlier centuries. The heroic women of historical fiction provide a glimpse into the challenges women of the past faced and how their bravery shaped today’s world. Here are a few of my favorite historical novels featuring strong women.

The years before the Civil War were tumultuous, especially in the Kansas Territory where abolitionists struggled to gain a stronghold and help the state enter the Union as a free state. Jane Smiley’s “The All-True Travels and Adventures of Lidie Newton,” features a Midwestern young woman who finds herself thrust into the upheaval of “Bleeding Kansas.” Lidie heads out to the territory with her abolitionist husband and (to be frank) completely unrealistic expectations of what the Kansas prairie will be like.  The story, filled with Lidie’s dry wit, is at times laugh-out-loud funny, and at others is quite sobering in its portrayal of the horror of slavery and violence of those years. I think Missouri residents will find this read especially interesting given all the Missouri locales that Lidie visits during her travels.

Book cover for Shanghai Girls by Lisa SeeThe experience of Chinese immigrants in WWII-era Los Angeles features in Lisa See’s “Shanghai Girls.” Pearl and May are sisters living exciting lives as models in glamorous Shanghai. When WWII breaks out, they find themselves in arranged marriages to sons of a Chinese-American merchant. Pearl and May are forced to leave China for the United States, landing first in the Angel Island Chinese immigration station and then in Los Angeles’ Chinatown. The sisters, bearing the weight of their own painful secrets, struggle to adjust to life under a domineering father-in-law and a society that is highly prejudicial against Asian-Americans. See’s novel, based in part on her own family’s experiences, provides a captivating look at the immigrant experience in this country.

Book cover for Year of WondersA small town’s struggle to survive during the Plague is chronicled in Geraldine Brooks’ “Year of Wonders.” The story is based on actual events — a small Derbyshire town called the village of Eyam quarantined itself in 1666 in order to prevent the plague from spreading further. Anna, a young maid, finds herself tasked with learning herbal remedies and midwifery when her village is overcome by the devastating disease. She becomes an important healer but faces many challenges, including the superstitions of the very people she is working to save. The novel is a beautifully written journey of self-discovery as Anna realizes strength and determination she did not know she possessed.

Happy reading!

The post Heroic Women of Historical Fiction appeared first on DBRL Next.

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Project Teen: Mask-Making

DBRLTeen - June 29, 2015

Project Teen: Mask-MakingTeen Mask
Friday, July 10 • Noon-1:30 p.m.
Callaway County Public Library

Create a mask that shows your super side (or your silly side or your creative side or whoever you have inside you). Plus, enjoy a free pizza lunch. Ages 12-18. No registration required.

Photo by Flickr User Zoe. Used under Creative Commons license.

Originally published at Project Teen: Mask-Making.

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Interview With Emily St. John Mandel on NPR’s Weekend Edition

One Read - June 26, 2015

 Dese'Rae L. StageListen to Scott Simon interview Emily St. John Mandel on NPR’s Weekend Edition Saturday. You can also read the interview highlights.

 

 

The post Interview With Emily St. John Mandel on NPR’s Weekend Edition appeared first on One READ.

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Next Month: Cosplay Costume Con for All Ages

DBRL Next - June 26, 2015

Cosplay Banner 1

Cosplay Costume Con for All Ages
Come to the library dressed as your favorite character! Whether superhero, anime, sci-fi or your own original design, we want to see you as you usually aren’t! Prizes will be given for costumes in different age categories, and participants can pose for some great photo ops. This program is for all ages! No registration required.

Columbia Public Library
Wednesday, July 22
at 6:00 p.m. Callaway County
Public Library
Thursday, July 30
at 6:30 p.m. Southern Boone County
Public Library
Tuesday, August 4
at 6:30 p.m.

Photos by Flickr User Marnie Joyce. Used under creative commons license.

The post Next Month: Cosplay Costume Con for All Ages appeared first on DBRL Next.

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Second Summer Reading Gift Card Winner Announced

DBRL Next - June 26, 2015

TrophyCongratulations to Laura J., a Columbia Public Library patron, for winning our second Adult Summer Reading prize drawing.  She is the recipient of a $25 Barnes & Noble gift card.

All it takes to be entered into our weekly drawings is to sign up for Adult Summer Reading. You can do this at any of our branch locations or Bookmobile stops or register online.  Also, don’t forget that submitting book reviews increases your chances of winning.  There are plenty of chances left to win this summer, so keep those reviews coming.

The post Second Summer Reading Gift Card Winner Announced appeared first on DBRL Next.

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Reader Review: Trigger Warning

DBRL Next - June 25, 2015

Book cover for Trigger WarningAs much as I adore Gaiman’s work, I just am not as thoroughly a fan of short stories (and generally even less of poetry). It feels like short fiction too often relies on cleverness as opposed to genuine moving prose to make its mark. With all that said, I still enjoyed reading these 300 pages. My favorite tale was definitely the aged Sherlock piece. I could happily read a novel in that world. In fact I could happily read a novel of just about any of these stories should they be expanded. And…I think I might like them more if they were allowed the room to breathe. The Doctor Who story was quirky and the Shadow tale was mildly gripping. I just inevitably find myself wanting more.

Three words that describe this book: fantastical, abbreviated, varied

You might want to pick this book up if: you’re a fan of Neil Gaiman. His style is distinct and is on full display here.

-Xander

The post Reader Review: Trigger Warning appeared first on DBRL Next.

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2016 Gateway Award Nominees

DBRLTeen - June 25, 2015

2016 Gateway Award Nominees The Gateway Readers Award honors a young adult novel that is selected by Missouri high school students. Even though this award is administered by the Missouri Association of School Librarians (MASL), it is the responsibility of Missouri teens to vote on the actual winner. These titles will be voted upon by students in March 2016; the recipient of the award will be announced in late April 2016 at the annual MASL Spring Conference. There is a great assortment of genres represented in this year’s list of nominees, so have fun choosing among historical fiction, realistic fiction, and, of course, dystopian literature.

In the Shadow of Blackbirds” by Cat Winters
As influenza and World War I take their toll, Mary Shelley Black watches mourners flock to séances and spirit photographers for comfort. Despite her scientific leanings, she is forced to consider if ghosts are real when her first love returns after being killed in battle.

Steelheart” by Brandon Sanderson
At age eight, David watched as his father was killed by an Epic, a human with superhuman powers. Ten years later, he joins the Reckoners, a group of rebels trying to kill the Epics and end their tyranny.

The Naturals” by Jennifer Lynn Barnes
Seventeen-year-old Cassie, who has a natural ability to read people, joins an elite group of criminal profilers at the FBI in order to help solve cold cases.

The Rules for Disappearing” by Ashley Elston
High school student “Meg” has changed identities so often she hardly knows who she is anymore. Despite her ever-changing persona, she always remembers the two rules of witness protection: be forgettable and do not make friends. However, in her new home, a boy named Ethan is making that rather difficult.

All Our Yesterdays” by Cristin Terrill
Imprisoned in the heart of a secret military base, Em has nothing except the voice of the boy in the cell next door and the list of instructions she finds taped inside the drain. Meanwhile, Marina has loved her best friend, James, since they were children. But on one disastrous night, James’s life crumbles, and with it, Marina’s hopes for their future.

Thousand Words” by Jennifer Brown
Talked into sending a nude picture of herself to her boyfriend while she was drunk, Ashleigh became the center of a sexting scandal. Now in court-ordered community service, she finds an unlikely ally, Mack.

I am the Weapon (Boy Nobody)” by Allen Zadoff
Boy Nobody, an assassin controlled by a shadowy government organization, considers sabotaging his latest mission because his target reminds him of the normal life he craves.

Escape from Eden” by Ellisa Nadler
Mia has long lived under the iron fist of the preacher who lured her mother away to join his fanatical followers. In Edenton, a supposed ‘Garden of Eden,’ everyone follows the Reverend’s strict rules – even the mandate of whom to marry. Now sixteen, Mia dreams of slipping away from the armed guards who keep the faithful in, and the curious out.

Proxy” by Alex London
Syd’s life is not his own. As a proxy he must pay for someone else’s crimes. When his patron Knox crashes a car and kills someone, Syd is branded and sentenced to death. The boys realize the only way to beat the system is to save each other.

Out of the Easy” by Ruta Sepetys
Josie, the 17-year-old daughter of a French Quarter prostitute, is striving to escape 1950 New Orleans and enroll at prestigious Smith College when she becomes entangled in a murder investigation.

The 5th Wave” by Rick Yancey
Cassie Sullivan, the survivor of an alien invasion, must rescue her younger brother from the enemy with help from a boy who may be one of them.

Winger” by Andrew Smith
Two years younger than his classmates at a prestigious boarding school, Ryan Dean West grapples with living in the dorm for troublemakers, falling for his female best friend who thinks of him as just a kid, and playing wing on the varsity rugby team.

Eleanor and Park” by Rainbow Rowell
Set over the course of one school year in 1986, this is the story of two star-crossed misfits. They are both smart enough to know that first love almost never lasts, but brave and desperate enough to try.

All the Truth That’s in Me” by Julie Berry
Judith can’t speak. But when her close-knit community of Roswell Station is attacked by enemies, Judith is forced to choose: continue to live in silence, or recover her voice.

The Program” by Suzanne Young
Sloane knows better than to cry in front of anyone. With suicide now an international epidemic, one outburst could land her in “The Program,” the only proven course of treatment. Sloane’s parents have already lost one child; she knows they’ll do anything to keep her alive. She also knows that everyone who’s been through “The Program” returns as a blank slate. While their depression is gone, so are their memories.

Originally published at 2016 Gateway Award Nominees.

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2016 Gateway Award Nominees

Teen Book Buzz - June 25, 2015

2016 Gateway Award Nominees The Gateway Readers Award honors a young adult novel that is selected by Missouri high school students. Even though this award is administered by the Missouri Association of School Librarians (MASL), it is the responsibility of Missouri teens to vote on the actual winner. These titles will be voted upon by students in March 2016; the recipient of the award will be announced in late April 2016 at the annual MASL Spring Conference. There is a great assortment of genres represented in this year’s list of nominees, so have fun choosing among historical fiction, realistic fiction, and, of course, dystopian literature.

In the Shadow of Blackbirds” by Cat Winters
As influenza and World War I take their toll, Mary Shelley Black watches mourners flock to séances and spirit photographers for comfort. Despite her scientific leanings, she is forced to consider if ghosts are real when her first love returns after being killed in battle.

Steelheart” by Brandon Sanderson
At age eight, David watched as his father was killed by an Epic, a human with superhuman powers. Ten years later, he joins the Reckoners, a group of rebels trying to kill the Epics and end their tyranny.

The Naturals” by Jennifer Lynn Barnes
Seventeen-year-old Cassie, who has a natural ability to read people, joins an elite group of criminal profilers at the FBI in order to help solve cold cases.

The Rules for Disappearing” by Ashley Elston
High school student “Meg” has changed identities so often she hardly knows who she is anymore. Despite her ever-changing persona, she always remembers the two rules of witness protection: be forgettable and do not make friends. However, in her new home, a boy named Ethan is making that rather difficult.

All Our Yesterdays” by Cristin Terrill
Imprisoned in the heart of a secret military base, Em has nothing except the voice of the boy in the cell next door and the list of instructions she finds taped inside the drain. Meanwhile, Marina has loved her best friend, James, since they were children. But on one disastrous night, James’s life crumbles, and with it, Marina’s hopes for their future.

Thousand Words” by Jennifer Brown
Talked into sending a nude picture of herself to her boyfriend while she was drunk, Ashleigh became the center of a sexting scandal. Now in court-ordered community service, she finds an unlikely ally, Mack.

I am the Weapon (Boy Nobody)” by Allen Zadoff
Boy Nobody, an assassin controlled by a shadowy government organization, considers sabotaging his latest mission because his target reminds him of the normal life he craves.

Escape from Eden” by Ellisa Nadler
Mia has long lived under the iron fist of the preacher who lured her mother away to join his fanatical followers. In Edenton, a supposed ‘Garden of Eden,’ everyone follows the Reverend’s strict rules – even the mandate of whom to marry. Now sixteen, Mia dreams of slipping away from the armed guards who keep the faithful in, and the curious out.

Proxy” by Alex London
Syd’s life is not his own. As a proxy he must pay for someone else’s crimes. When his patron Knox crashes a car and kills someone, Syd is branded and sentenced to death. The boys realize the only way to beat the system is to save each other.

Out of the Easy” by Ruta Sepetys
Josie, the 17-year-old daughter of a French Quarter prostitute, is striving to escape 1950 New Orleans and enroll at prestigious Smith College when she becomes entangled in a murder investigation.

The 5th Wave” by Rick Yancey
Cassie Sullivan, the survivor of an alien invasion, must rescue her younger brother from the enemy with help from a boy who may be one of them.

Winger” by Andrew Smith
Two years younger than his classmates at a prestigious boarding school, Ryan Dean West grapples with living in the dorm for troublemakers, falling for his female best friend who thinks of him as just a kid, and playing wing on the varsity rugby team.

Eleanor and Park” by Rainbow Rowell
Set over the course of one school year in 1986, this is the story of two star-crossed misfits. They are both smart enough to know that first love almost never lasts, but brave and desperate enough to try.

All the Truth That’s in Me” by Julie Berry
Judith can’t speak. But when her close-knit community of Roswell Station is attacked by enemies, Judith is forced to choose: continue to live in silence, or recover her voice.

The Program” by Suzanne Young
Sloane knows better than to cry in front of anyone. With suicide now an international epidemic, one outburst could land her in “The Program,” the only proven course of treatment. Sloane’s parents have already lost one child; she knows they’ll do anything to keep her alive. She also knows that everyone who’s been through “The Program” returns as a blank slate. While their depression is gone, so are their memories.

Originally published at 2016 Gateway Award Nominees.

Categories: Book Buzz
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