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Book Cover Contest

DBRLTeen - September 11, 2014

Teen Read Week Banner

Teen Read Week is an annual celebration of reading! This year’s theme is “Turn Dreams Into Reality.” In honor of this theme, we want to see what new covers you can dream up for your favorite book. Just pick a title and redesign the cover with your own original artwork to show us how you imagine the story.

Entries will be judged on composition, originality and quality of artwork. Winners will be announced in November at teens.dbrl.org and each will receive a Barnes & Noble gift card.

Contest Deadline:

Entries must be received by 5 p.m. on Friday, October 17.

Eligibility:
  • The contest is open to participants between 12 and 18 years old.
  • Participants must reside in either Boone or Callaway County, Missouri.
The Rules:
  • Contest participants must enter their artwork using the DBRLTeen Book Cover Contest entry form.
  • The  book title and author name should be incorporated somewhere in your design.
  • You may use any art material you like to create your book cover, but your design must be flat and it must fill the rectangle on the back of the entry form.
  • Only one entry per person will be allowed.
How to Enter:

Download an entry form, or pick one up at your nearest library branch or bookmobile stop. Once you have designed your book cover and filled out your information on the back, you may submit your entry form one of two ways:

Option 1: Turn your entry form in at the Children’s Desk at your nearest library branch or bookmobile stop.

Option 2:  You may mail your completed entry form to:

Daniel Boone Regional Library
ATTN: Brandy Sanchez
100 W. Broadway
Columbia, MO 65203

Originally published at Book Cover Contest.

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On the Water: Art Exhibit Winners

One Read - September 11, 2014

For this year’s One Read art exhibit, we asked area artists to contribute works that explore a range of experiences and views of water, whether from shore or flying across the water itself, “in a poem of motion, a symphony of swinging blades.” We were absolutely thrilled by the response and the range of artworks submitted.

At the exhibit’s opening reception on September 9, the following winners and honorable mentions were announced.

First place: “Row, Row, Row,”  fiber art, paint and paper, by Leandra Spangler

Photoe of artist Leandra Spangler

Second place: “Down by the River,” fiber art, by Rebecca Douglas

Fiber Art by Rebecca Douglas

Third place: “Sunset,” oil on wood panel, by Katherine Barnes

Oil painting by Katherine Barnes

Honorable Mentions:

Hannah Ingmire, “The Magic World of Under the Water” (mixed media)
Scott McMahon, “Light on Water” (video)
Robert Sherman, “Silver Fish” (photograph)
Tom Stauder, “Boys in the Boat” (wood sculpture boys)
Jerry Thompson, “Booth Bay” (water color)

A very big thank you to the Columbia Art League, Columbia’s Office of Cultural Affairs and Orr Street Studios for their support and promotion of this event. The One Read art exhibit will be on display at Orr Street Studios through September 20.

The post On the Water: Art Exhibit Winners appeared first on One READ.

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Jane Goodall: Champion of Chimps, Defender of the Earth, Rock Star

DBRL Next - September 10, 2014

Book cover for Seeds of Hope by Jane GoodallJane Goodall is coming to town! In my circles, this is the biggest news since Bob Dylan did a show here ten years ago. Goodall will be speaking at Mizzou Arena on Wednesday, September 17. According to her website “She will…discuss the current threats facing the planet and her reasons for hope in these complex times.”

Goodall is best known for her studies of chimpanzees. She was 26 when Louis Leakey sent her to Tanzania to begin her research in 1960. Authorities in the area expressed resistance to the idea of a young woman traveling alone on this project, so her mother accompanied her for the first few months. Goodall made several new discoveries about chimps. The most remarkable was the fact that they create and use tools. She made it her mission to educate humanity about the fascinating creatures who are so similar to us in some ways, and in the process she became one of the most widely recognized scientists in the world. In 1977 she founded the Jane Goodall Institute to “protect chimpanzees and their habitats.”

Over the years her focus has expanded to other animals, to plants and to the world environment as a whole, including her own species. Roots and Shoots is a youth-led program affiliated with the Jane Goodall Institute. It encourages young people to become involved in solving problems within their own communities.

If you can’t make it to the lecture, we have plenty of Goodall goodness here for you at the library. Check out some of the following materials:

Among the Wild Chimpanzees.” This DVD from “National Geographic” shows us two decades worth of Goodall’s work among these amazing primates.

Hope for Animals and Their World.” In this book Goodall provides evidence that we can save endangered species by highlighting conservation efforts that have made a positive difference.

Seeds of Hope” discusses the roles of plants in the world and humanity’s relationship with the flora around us.

Jane Goodall,” a 2008 biography by Meg Greene, provides background on Goodall’s childhood, career and personal life.

Our catalog list will direct you to even more titles about Goodall and wildlife conservation.

The post Jane Goodall: Champion of Chimps, Defender of the Earth, Rock Star appeared first on DBRL Next.

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New DVD: “The Unknown Known”

Center Aisle Cinema - September 8, 2014

unknownknown

We recently added “The Known Unknown” to the DBRL collection. This film played at the True/False Film Festival in 2014, and currently has a rating of 84% from critics at Rotten Tomatoes. Here’s a synopsis from our catalog:

Former United States Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld discusses his career in Washington, D.C. from his days as a congressman in the early 1960s to planning the invasion of Iraq in 2003.

Check out the film trailer or the official film site for more info.

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Remembering Joan Rivers

Next Book Buzz - September 8, 2014

Book cover for I Hate Everyone by Joan RiversShe was sassy, opinionated, brash, self-deprecating, raunchy, offensive and funny. Joan Rivers passed away last week at the age of 81, and her death has left me thinking about both her signature brand of stand-up and the female comedians who have followed in her wake. Her daughter, Melissa Rivers, said in a statement, “My mother’s greatest joy in life was to make people laugh. Although that is difficult to do right now, I know her final wish would be that we return to laughing soon.” Here are some books from Rivers and her cohort to help us fulfill that wish.

We Killed: The Rise of Women in American Comedy” by Yael Kohen.
This oral history presents more than 150 interviews from America’s most prominent comediennes (and the writers, producers, nightclub owners, and colleagues who revolved around them) to piece together the revolution that happened to (and by) women in American comedy. Kohen traces the careers and achievements of comediennes – including Rivers – and challenges opinions about why women cannot be effective comedic entertainers.

I Hate Everyone – Starting With Me” by Joan Rivers
Read this with a cocktail in hand. Rivers humorously lashes out at the people, places and things she loathes, including ugly children, dating rituals, First Ladies, funerals, hypocrites, overrated historical figures, Hollywood and lousy restaurants.

Enter Talking” by Joan Rivers
Joan Rivers describes her bitter and bizarre rise to stardom, from her earliest memories that she belonged onstage, through her independent struggle in Manhattan, to the evolution of her one-person show and the winning of public and critical acclaim.

Book cover for The Bedwetter by Sarah SilvermanThe Bedwetter: Stories of Courage, Redemption, and Pee” by Sarah Silverman
Comedian Silverman’s memoir mixes showbiz moments with the more serious subject of her teenage bout with depression as well as stories of her childhood and adolescence.

Is Everyone Hanging Out Without Me? (and Other Concerns)” by Mindy Kaling
The writer and actress best known as Kelly Kapoor on “The Office” shares observations on topics ranging from favorite male archetypes and her hatred of dieting to her relationship with her mother and the haphazard creative process in the “Office” writers’ room.

Seriously, I’m Kidding” by Ellen DeGeneres
For those who like their humor to be cleaner than what Rivers delivers. The stand-up comedian, television host, bestselling author and actress candidly discusses her personal life and professional career and describes what it was like to become a judge on “American Idol.”

Editor’s note: book descriptions adapted from publishers’ marketing text.

The post Remembering Joan Rivers appeared first on DBRL Next.

Categories: Book Buzz

Remembering Joan Rivers

DBRL Next - September 8, 2014

Book cover for I Hate Everyone by Joan RiversShe was sassy, opinionated, brash, self-deprecating, raunchy, offensive and funny. Joan Rivers passed away last week at the age of 81, and her death has left me thinking about both her signature brand of stand-up and the female comedians who have followed in her wake. Her daughter, Melissa Rivers, said in a statement, “My mother’s greatest joy in life was to make people laugh. Although that is difficult to do right now, I know her final wish would be that we return to laughing soon.” Here are some books from Rivers and her cohort to help us fulfill that wish.

We Killed: The Rise of Women in American Comedy” by Yael Kohen.
This oral history presents more than 150 interviews from America’s most prominent comediennes (and the writers, producers, nightclub owners, and colleagues who revolved around them) to piece together the revolution that happened to (and by) women in American comedy. Kohen traces the careers and achievements of comediennes – including Rivers – and challenges opinions about why women cannot be effective comedic entertainers.

I Hate Everyone – Starting With Me” by Joan Rivers
Read this with a cocktail in hand. Rivers humorously lashes out at the people, places and things she loathes, including ugly children, dating rituals, First Ladies, funerals, hypocrites, overrated historical figures, Hollywood and lousy restaurants.

Enter Talking” by Joan Rivers
Joan Rivers describes her bitter and bizarre rise to stardom, from her earliest memories that she belonged onstage, through her independent struggle in Manhattan, to the evolution of her one-person show and the winning of public and critical acclaim.

Book cover for The Bedwetter by Sarah SilvermanThe Bedwetter: Stories of Courage, Redemption, and Pee” by Sarah Silverman
Comedian Silverman’s memoir mixes showbiz moments with the more serious subject of her teenage bout with depression as well as stories of her childhood and adolescence.

Is Everyone Hanging Out Without Me? (and Other Concerns)” by Mindy Kaling
The writer and actress best known as Kelly Kapoor on “The Office” shares observations on topics ranging from favorite male archetypes and her hatred of dieting to her relationship with her mother and the haphazard creative process in the “Office” writers’ room.

Seriously, I’m Kidding” by Ellen DeGeneres
For those who like their humor to be cleaner than what Rivers delivers. The stand-up comedian, television host, bestselling author and actress candidly discusses her personal life and professional career and describes what it was like to become a judge on “American Idol.”

Editor’s note: book descriptions adapted from publishers’ marketing text.

The post Remembering Joan Rivers appeared first on DBRL Next.

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Reader Review: A Tree Grows in Brooklyn

DBRL Next - September 5, 2014

Editor’s note: This review was submitted by a library patron during the 2014 Adult Summer Reading program. We will continue to periodically share some of these reviews throughout the year.

Book cover for A Tree Grows in Brooklyn by Betty SmithA Tree Grows in Brooklyn” is about life, family and resilience in the early 1900s (In Brooklyn). Despite the departure in time and location from my present existence, it resonated with me. Smith’s character development was rich and truthful. Characters were not portrayed as foes or heroines, just people. It’s nice to read something without an overt slant or agenda or predictable plot.

Three words that describe this book: genuine, rich, fulfilling

You might want to pick this book up if: you love people and how they interact. This is a story of resilience.

-Anonymous

The post Reader Review: A Tree Grows in Brooklyn appeared first on DBRL Next.

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Books for Dudes – Every Day

DBRLTeen - September 5, 2014

Every Day,” by David Leviathan, challenges how we think of a main protagonist. This story is about A, who wakes up in a different body every single day. A tries to live each person’s life as they would or, at the very least, to not interfere at all and go unnoticed.  A is a unique character, as there’s no real assigned gender – sometimes A is a boy, sometimes A is a girl. Both genders feel natural.

Every Day, by David LevithanWhile every day is different, A’s life has a certain regularity until falling for a girl named Rhiannon. After making this fateful connection, A’s life changes…whether boy or girl, A tries to get whatever body being inhabited back to spend time with Rhiannon, telling her the secret of A’s life…and A wants Rhiannon to love him/her every day, regardless of whose body is being inhabited.

Obviously, this relationship doesn’t make things easy for Rhiannon, as she tries to adjust to seeing a different face every day. In addition to the romantic conflict, a mysterious reverend is trying to find out more about A, and the “why” infuses the story with an increased sense of danger and urgency.

This story really made me think about A’s predicament. If you go to Amazon or Goodreads, A is assigned a “he,” although in the story itself, there’s no assigned gender. A has been switching bodies every day since birth. And how would it feel to inhabit the body of someone else, even someone we knew, for a day? Would we be tempted  to nose around in people’s lives, to make changes?  Could we possibly still value their privacy, as A tries to do?

Every Day” is not easy (you’ll be pondering all sorts of scenarios in this book), but it is a really good read. I would love to know what happens next at the end of this novel, which usually is one indicator of a good story. Check it out and see what you think!

Originally published at Books for Dudes – Every Day.

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Stan Lee Wants You to Get a Library Card

DBRL Next - September 3, 2014

National Library Card Sign-up Month Poster featuring Stan LeeSeptember is the National Library Card Month (chaired this year by comic creator Stan Lee), and libraries across the country want you to know that one of the most important back-to-school supplies is a library card. It’s also the cheapest (i.e., free), and getting your hands on one doesn’t require fighting the hoards at a big box store.

Since this is a library blog, I’m preaching to the choir here. You, dear reader, already have a library card. (If you know someone who doesn’t, encourage them to apply for one in person or online.) But did you know the range of tools and materials you have access to with that card? Not only can you get books, but your library card is also your ticket for free access to:

Mr. Lee says it best: “The smartest card in my wallet? It’s a library card.”

The post Stan Lee Wants You to Get a Library Card appeared first on DBRL Next.

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Voting Begins for “Teens’ Top Ten”

Teen Book Buzz - September 3, 2014

Vote for the “Teens’ Top Ten!”

The “Teens’ Top Ten” is a list of recommended reading sponsored by the Young Adult Library Services Association. In fact, it’s the only reading list with titles nominated and voted on by teens.

How does it work?

  • Sixteen young adult book clubs from libraries nationwide are responsible for narrowing down a list of nominees for teens to consider. (Does your book club want to get involved? Learn how.)
  • Based on the recommendations of these teen book clubs, the list of this year’s 28 nominees was announced in April during National Library Week.
  • Throughout the summer months, teens are encouraged to read as many of these titles as humanly possible.
  • Readers ages 12-18 are invited to vote on their three favorite books through September 15.
  • During Teen Read Week, October 12-18, the 10 most popular titles will be announced as the official 2014 “Teens’ Top Ten” list. Don’t forget to subscribe to our blog updates to have this and other teen book news delivered to your email inbox!

Originally published at Voting Begins for “Teens’ Top Ten”.

Categories: Book Buzz

Voting Begins for “Teens’ Top Ten”

DBRLTeen - September 3, 2014

Vote for the “Teens’ Top Ten!”

The “Teens’ Top Ten” is a list of recommended reading sponsored by the Young Adult Library Services Association. In fact, it’s the only reading list with titles nominated and voted on by teens.

How does it work?

  • Sixteen young adult book clubs from libraries nationwide are responsible for narrowing down a list of nominees for teens to consider. (Does your book club want to get involved? Learn how.)
  • Based on the recommendations of these teen book clubs, the list of this year’s 28 nominees was announced in April during National Library Week.
  • Throughout the summer months, teens are encouraged to read as many of these titles as humanly possible.
  • Readers ages 12-18 are invited to vote on their three favorite books through September 15.
  • During Teen Read Week, October 12-18, the 10 most popular titles will be announced as the official 2014 “Teens’ Top Ten” list. Don’t forget to subscribe to our blog updates to have this and other teen book news delivered to your email inbox!

Originally published at Voting Begins for “Teens’ Top Ten”.

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One Read Film Events — September 2014

Center Aisle Cinema - September 2, 2014

Daniel Boone Regional Library is sponsoring various films this month in conjunction with the One Read program. This year’s book is The Boys in the Boat by Daniel Brown, which is a  is an uplifting and fast-paced Cinderella story.

europa

The Rape of Europa” 
Friday, September 5, 2014 • 7-9:30 p.m.
106 Lefevre Hall, University of Missouri

As part of our exploration of the 1930s during this year’s One Read program, view this fascinating documentary which uses historic footage and interviews to tell the epic story of the destruction, theft and rescue of the great artworks of Europe during World War II. As Nazis loot and pillage, those dedicated to saving the art do everything in their power to protect it, including emptying the Louvre and evacuating the Hermitage. Directed by Richard Berge, Bonni Cohen and Nicole Newnham and narrated by Joan Allen. The film will be introduced by the Museum of Art and Archaeology’s director, Alex Barker.

monumentsmenMonuments Men” 
Tuesday, September 9, 2014 • 7 p.m.
William Woods University Library Auditorium

Based on a true story, this feature film follows a World War II platoon as they track down art stolen by the Nazis and return the masterpieces to their rightful owners. Following the film, Dr. Greg Smith, WWU associate professor of English and film, will lead a discussion about the movie and the University of Washington’s crew team’s experiences at the 1936 Berlin Olympic games, as recounted in this year’s One Read selection, “The Boys in the Boat.”

glickman

Glickman
Wednesday, September 17, 2014 • 6:30 p.m.
Columbia Public Library – Friends Room

Before Bob Costas, there was Marty Glickman. A gifted Jewish-American athlete who was denied the chance to represent the U.S. at the 1936 Berlin Olympics, he went on to become one of the most revered and influential sportscasters in history, pioneering many of the techniques, phrases and programming innovations that are commonplace in sports reporting today. This HBO documentary directed by James L. Freedman is a companion to our One Read book, “The Boys in the Boat,” a story of the U.S. crew team 1936 Olympics.

kingofthehill

King of the Hill
Monday, September 22, 2014 • 5:30 p.m.
Ragtag Cinema, 10 Hitt St.

As part of One Read, enjoy a free screening of the historical drama “King of the Hill,” directed by Steven Soderbergh. This film, shot in St. Louis and set in the 1930s, Depression-era Midwest, contains echos of Joe Rantz, the central character of “The Boys in the Boat.” It follows a young boy as he struggles on his own in a run-down motel after his parents and younger brother are separated from him. (Rated PG-13, 103 min.)

 

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On the Water

DBRL Next - August 29, 2014

Book cover for Perfect WavesMy family is lucky to own a beachfront home on Lake Michigan, an amazing place. Sounds fancy, doesn’t it?  Well, it has lots of quirks.  We have had floods, erosion and falling trees. But the lake has its own kind of magic. When we were there on a recent trip, the water was in the low sixties. Despite the cold, we all ended up boating, kayaking and swimming.

When I was a child it seemed like every summer day was spent in a river, lake, pond or puddle. If I ever need to get away, I find myself near water. The sounds, smells and rhythm of water soothe my soul. This year’s One Read book, Daniel James Brown’s “The Boys in the Boat,” captures the magical properties of water much more eloquently than I do. If you cannot get to the water, below is a list of books that have images to help you imagine.

For even more views of being “On the Water,” join us for a One Read art exhibit at Orr Street Studios in Columbia, on display September 7 – 20, with a reception on September 9.

The post On the Water appeared first on DBRL Next.

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The One Read 2014 Event Calendar is Here!

One Read - August 29, 2014

OR-2014-insert-coverThe full line-up of this year’s One Read programs is now available! Pick up a copy at any library branch or bookmobile, or see our online guide.

We have a wide range of exciting programs scheduled for the coming weeks as we explore the themes and topics in Daniel James Brown’s book, “The Boys in the Boat: Nine Americans and Their Epic Quest for Gold at the 1936 Berlin Olympics.” We will even have a visit from the author himself on September 30.

Join us in September for:

The post The One Read 2014 Event Calendar is Here! appeared first on One READ.

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Registration Dates for Upcoming ACT & SAT Exams

DBRLTeen - August 29, 2014

Standardized TestThe registration deadlines are fast approaching for those planning to take the next round of ACT and SAT exams.

  • Registration for the October 25 ACT exam is due Friday, September 19. Sign-up online.
  • Registration for the November 8 SAT exam is due Thursday, October 9. Sign-up online.

If you would like to know more about testing locations, exam costs and fee waivers, please visit our  online guide to SAT/ACT preparation. The library also has a wide selection of printed ACT and SAT test guides for you to borrow.

Our most popular resource for test-takers, though, is LearningExpress Library. Through this website, you may take free online practice tests for the ACT or SAT exam. To access LearningExpress Library, you will need to login using your DBRL library card number. Your PIN is your birthdate (MMDDYYYY).  If you have questions or encounter difficulties logging in, please call  (800) 324-4806.

Finally, don’t forget to subscribe to our blog updates for regular reminders of upcoming test registration deadlines!

Originally published at Registration Dates for Upcoming ACT & SAT Exams.

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Review: Dominion by C.J. Sansom

Next Book Buzz - August 27, 2014

Book cover for Dominion by CJ SansomOn a recent day trip to the Omnimax theater at the St. Louis Science Center to see a film about D-Day, my father-in-law commented on how things might be now if Germany won the war. His comment struck a chord, reminding me of a book that I had recently learned of – C.J. Sansom’s alternate history, “Dominion.” This alternative history imagines a world in which World War II has not occurred.

Great Britain, still reeling from the war torn years of WWI, finds itself under the leadership of Lord Halifax rather than Winston Churchill. This single act drastically changes the world that would have been had WWII been allowed to play out. Author C.J. Sansom sets “Dominion” in the early 1950s, over a decade after a 1940 truce between the two nations. Great Britain now finds itself more and more under the control of its Fascist alli. During that decade, European Jews and now British Jews are gathered and shipped off to camps, under the guise of separating the races. In fact, they are being exterminated, as Nazis attempt to create a “pure” empire.

Sansom focuses his story on the growing resistance movement that fights relentlessly to overthrow the German regime that has infiltrated Great Britain. He follows David, a civil servant, who also happens to be working as a spy for the resistance; Sarah, David’s wife, and a pacifist; Frank, a college friend of David’s who holds a secret the Nazis will kill to get their hands on; and Gunther, the SS officer sent to capture Frank. “Dominion” is told from their various perspectives.

I loved the depth brought to the story as its perspective moved back and forth between these rich and compelling characters. Sansom’s research is also highly evident, particularly in his notes section at the book’s end. So although this is an alternative history, it is chock full of people who did exist. Sansom even incorporates other aspects of history into the story that add to its realism. For example, he includes a true fog event that occurred during the very time period during which the novel is set, which ultimately impacts the events that occur within the novel. Sansom’s extensive research truly creates a world that could have existed if the events of 1940 had gone differently.

“Dominion” is a great read for anyone who loves a thriller, but readers of historical fiction may find it satisfying as well thanks to all the research and real history found throughout the story. And for those of us who enjoy learning about history, but also enjoy pondering “what if,” it is certainly a book that does not disappoint. (And for those who are intrigued by the idea of reading alternative histories, the library owns several beyond this title. Check out some that you may enjoy reading by browsing our catalog.)

The post Review: Dominion by C.J. Sansom appeared first on DBRL Next.

Categories: Book Buzz

Review: Dominion by C.J. Sansom

DBRL Next - August 27, 2014

Book cover for Dominion by CJ SansomOn a recent day trip to the Omnimax theater at the St. Louis Science Center to see a film about D-Day, my father-in-law commented on how things might be now if Germany won the war. His comment struck a chord, reminding me of a book that I had recently learned of – C.J. Sansom’s alternate history, “Dominion.” This alternative history imagines a world in which World War II has not occurred.

Great Britain, still reeling from the war torn years of WWI, finds itself under the leadership of Lord Halifax rather than Winston Churchill. This single act drastically changes the world that would have been had WWII been allowed to play out. Author C.J. Sansom sets “Dominion” in the early 1950s, over a decade after a 1940 truce between the two nations. Great Britain now finds itself more and more under the control of its Fascist alli. During that decade, European Jews and now British Jews are gathered and shipped off to camps, under the guise of separating the races. In fact, they are being exterminated, as Nazis attempt to create a “pure” empire.

Sansom focuses his story on the growing resistance movement that fights relentlessly to overthrow the German regime that has infiltrated Great Britain. He follows David, a civil servant, who also happens to be working as a spy for the resistance; Sarah, David’s wife, and a pacifist; Frank, a college friend of David’s who holds a secret the Nazis will kill to get their hands on; and Gunther, the SS officer sent to capture Frank. “Dominion” is told from their various perspectives.

I loved the depth brought to the story as its perspective moved back and forth between these rich and compelling characters. Sansom’s research is also highly evident, particularly in his notes section at the book’s end. So although this is an alternative history, it is chock full of people who did exist. Sansom even incorporates other aspects of history into the story that add to its realism. For example, he includes a true fog event that occurred during the very time period during which the novel is set, which ultimately impacts the events that occur within the novel. Sansom’s extensive research truly creates a world that could have existed if the events of 1940 had gone differently.

“Dominion” is a great read for anyone who loves a thriller, but readers of historical fiction may find it satisfying as well thanks to all the research and real history found throughout the story. And for those of us who enjoy learning about history, but also enjoy pondering “what if,” it is certainly a book that does not disappoint. (And for those who are intrigued by the idea of reading alternative histories, the library owns several beyond this title. Check out some that you may enjoy reading by browsing our catalog.)

The post Review: Dominion by C.J. Sansom appeared first on DBRL Next.

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Upcoming Teen Game Nights

DBRLTeen - August 26, 2014

Wii U Dance-OffPizza
Wednesday, September 17, 2:45-5 p.m.
Think you have the best dance moves? Prove it! Bring your moves and your friends to this fun dance competition using “Just Dance” on the Wii U. We’ll have treats and other goodies. Grades 6-8. No registration required.

Wii U Family Game Night
Columbia Public Library
Thursday September 18, 6:00 p.m.
Drop in to try out the library’s Wii U game console. Become a dancing superstar in “Just Dance 4″ or a bowling champion playing “Wii Sports.” Pizza served. Ages 10 and older. Parents welcome. Registration begins Tuesday, September 2. To sign up, please call (573) 443-3161.

Originally published at Upcoming Teen Game Nights.

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New DVD: “Maidentrip”

Center Aisle Cinema - August 25, 2014

maidentrip

We recently added “Maidentrip” to the DBRL collection. The film was shown last year at the Citizen Jane Film Festival and currently has a rating of 82% from audiences at Rotten Tomatoes. Here’s a synopsis from our catalog:

Fourteen-year-old Laura Dekker sets out, camera in hand, on a two-year voyage in pursuit of her dream to be the youngest person ever to sail around the world alone. In the wake of a year-long battle with Dutch authorities that sparked a global storm of media scrutiny, Laura now finds herself far from land, family and unwanted attention, exploring the world in search of freedom, adventure, and distant dreams of her early youth at sea.

Check out the film trailer or the official film site for more info.

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Top Ten Books Librarians Love: The September 2014 List

Next Book Buzz - August 25, 2014

Library Reads logoSeptember is upon us! Time to get serious and hit the books. This month’s list of recommended titles from LibraryReads leaves behind the lighter fare of summer and includes some heavy-hitting literary fiction, as well as a book that stares death in the face. Here are the top 10 books being published in September that librarians love.

Book cover for Smoke Gets in Your Eyes by Caitlin DoughtySmoke Gets in Your Eyes: And Other Lessons from the Crematory
by Caitlin Doughty
“Part memoir, part exposé of the death industry, and part instruction manual for aspiring morticians. First-time author Doughty has written an attention-grabbing book that is sure to start some provocative discussions. Fans of Mary Roach’s ‘Stiff’ and anyone who enjoys an honest, well-written autobiography will appreciate this quirky story.”
Patty Falconer, Hampstead Public Library, Hampstead, NH

Book cover for Station Eleven by Emily St. John MandelStation Eleven
by Emily St. John Mandel
“An actor playing King Lear dies onstage just before a cataclysmic event changes the future of everyone on Earth. What will be valued and what will be discarded? Will art have a place in a world that has lost so much? What will make life worth living? These are just some of the issues explored in this beautifully written dystopian novel. Recommended for fans of David Mitchell, John Scalzi and Kate Atkinson.”
Janet Lockhart, Wake County Public Libraries, Cary, NC

Book cover for The Secret Place by Tana FrenchThe Secret Place
by Tana French
“French has broken my heart yet again with her fifth novel, which examines the ways in which teenagers and adults can be wily, calculating and backstabbing, even with their friends. The tension-filled flashback narratives, relating to a murder investigation in suburban Dublin, will keep you turning pages late into the night.”
Alison McCarty, Nassau County Public Library System, Callahan, FL

And here is the rest of the list with links to our catalog so you can place holds on these on-order titles.

The post Top Ten Books Librarians Love: The September 2014 List appeared first on DBRL Next.

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