Feed aggregator

Celebrate National Craft Month With Help From Your Library

DBRL Next - March 26, 2014

March is National Craft Month! Work on your favorite craft, learn a new craft or make something with your kids. The library has lots of good books to help.

Book cover for T-shirt Quilts Made EasyDo you have an overabundance of t-shirts? Give an old t-shirt a new look. “T-shirt Style: Creating Fabulous Must-have Looks” by Gabrielle Sterbenz can help.  Or turn a t-shirt into something completely different. Try “Generation T: 108 Ways to Transform a T-shirt” by Megan Nicolay or “T-shirt Quilts Made Easy” by Martha DeLeonardis. The Internet has some great ideas also.  Michaels.com has instructions for an easy necklace, and Nancy’s Couture has instructions for a fun fringed scarf.

Book cover for Cupcakes, Cookies, & Pie, Oh My!Do you like to reuse and recycle? Read  “Alternacrafts” by Jessica Vitkus or “Upcycling: Create Beautiful Things with the Stuff You Already Have” by Danny Seo. Just need inspiration? “1000 ideas for Creative Reuse” by Garth Johnson has lots of fun photos but no instructions.

Be creative in the kitchen. “Cupcakes, Cookies & Pie, Oh, My!” by Karen Tack & Alan Richardson has instructions for a variety of edible creatures, some easy, some challenging. Or attend a library program, and join us for Cupcake Decorating Basics at the Southern Boone County Public Library in Ashland on April 1.

Do you love to take photos? Why not create a scrapbook using ideas from “Scrapbook Tips & Techniques” from the editors of Creating Keepsakes magazine? Would you like to learn how to edit and enhance your digital photos? You could register for and attend the library program “Working with Digital Photos” on April 30 in Columbia.

Craft with paper and make your own greeting cards. “Ultimate Handbook for Paper Crafters” has tips and ideas for over 1,000 projects. Or attend the library program “Spring Card-Making” at the Southern Boone County Public Library in Ashland on April 25.

 20 Projects for the Whole FamilyI love crafts year round and always have a project going.  I just finished a “Landscape Quilt” from “Sew Fun: 20 Projects for the Whole Family” by Deborah Fisher. Now I’m working on a rag doll version of Peter Pan for my grandson. “Rag Dolls and How to Make Them” has instructions. I also have plenty of future plans. I found some fun fabrics with a grapevine and wine theme that I want to turn into a table runner. “Tabletop Quilts: 34 Projects” has clear instructions and wonderful photographs. Someday I would like to learn to knit and crochet, so “Knitting for Dummies” by Pam Allen and “Crocheting for Dummies” by Karen Manthey are on my “For Later” list in BiblioCommons, the library’s online catalog.

No matter your skill level, have some fun making something this month. It doesn’t matter how the finished product looks; just enjoy the process. You might find a new hobby that makes you happy.

For families with children under the age of 12, visit DBRL Kids for my recommendations for activities appropriate for little ones.

The post Celebrate National Craft Month With Help From Your Library appeared first on DBRL Next.

Categories: More From DBRL...

2014 Teen Book Tournament Finalists Announced

Teen Book Buzz - March 25, 2014

VOTE NOW through March 31 for the tournament champion!

Book-Tourney-graphic-2014Three months of reading and preparation have led to this moment: the announcement of our teen book tournament finalists! Thank you to all the students who have shared their favorites with us. So far, we’ve collected over 225 ballots from dozens of area teens. With each round of voting, teens’ names have been entered into a drawing for a free Barnes & Noble gift card or an autographed copy of “Legend” by Marie Lu! Prize winners will be announced next Wednesday, April 2 when we announce our tournament champion.

March Madness Teen Book Tournament Finalists Don’t forget to VOTE for your favorite title by Monday, March 31 at 5 p.m. You may vote online at teens.dbrl.org or pick up a paper ballot at one of our three branch locations

Originally published at 2014 Teen Book Tournament Finalists Announced.

Categories: Book Buzz

2014 Teen Book Tournament Finalists Announced

DBRLTeen - March 25, 2014

VOTE NOW through March 31 for the tournament champion!

Book-Tourney-graphic-2014Three months of reading and preparation have led to this moment: the announcement of our teen book tournament finalists! Thank you to all the students who have shared their favorites with us. So far, we’ve collected over 225 ballots from dozens of area teens. With each round of voting, teens’ names have been entered into a drawing for a free Barnes & Noble gift card or an autographed copy of “Legend” by Marie Lu! Prize winners will be announced next Wednesday, April 2 when we announce our tournament champion.

March Madness Teen Book Tournament Finalists Don’t forget to VOTE for your favorite title by Monday, March 31 at 5 p.m. You may vote online at teens.dbrl.org or pick up a paper ballot at one of our three branch locations

Originally published at 2014 Teen Book Tournament Finalists Announced.

Categories: More From DBRL...

New DVD: “Our Nixon”

Center Aisle Cinema - March 24, 2014

ournixon

We recently added “Our Nixon” to the DBRL collection. The film played last year at various film festivals and currently has a rating of 92% from critics at Rotten Tomatoes. Here’s a synopsis from our catalog:

Throughout Richard Nixon’s presidency, three of his top White House aides obsessively documented their experiences with Super 8 home movie cameras. Young, idealistic and dedicated, they had no idea that a few years later they’d all be in prison.

Check out the film trailer or the official film site for more info.

Categories: More From DBRL...

Top Ten Books Librarians Love: The April List

Next Book Buzz - March 24, 2014

LibraryReads logoApril showers bring May flowers, and also a great crop of new books from LibraryReads! Here is the monthly list of forthcoming books librarians across the country recommend.

Book cover for The Storied Life of A.J. FikryThe Storied Life of A. J. Fikry
by Gabrielle Zevin
“A middle-aged bookseller mourning his lost wife, a feisty publisher’s rep and a charmingly precocious abandoned child come together on a small island off the New England coast in this utterly delightful novel of love and second chances.”
-Beth Mills, New Rochelle Public Library, New Rochelle, NY

Book cover for Frog Music by Emma DonoghueFrog Music
by Emma Donoghue
“Donoghue returns to historical fiction in this latest offering, based on the unsolved murder of Jenny Bonnet, a cross-dressing frog catcher with a mysterious past. Set in 1870s San Francisco, this brilliant book includes impeccable historical details, from a smallpox epidemic to period songs.”
-Diane Scholl, Batavia Public Library, IL

Book cover for And the Dark Sacred Night by Julia GlassAnd the Dark Sacred Night
by Julia Glass
“Four stars to Julia Glass for this, her best work since ‘Three Junes.’ We become reacquainted with old characters Malachy, Fenno and Walter and learn more about their life stories. The individuals are imperfectly human and perfectly drawn. A wonderful, highly recommended novel.”
-Kelly Currie, Delphi Public Library, Delphi, IN

Here is the rest of the list for your browsing and hold-placing pleasure!

The post Top Ten Books Librarians Love: The April List appeared first on DBRL Next.

Categories: Book Buzz

Top Ten Books Librarians Love: The April List

DBRL Next - March 24, 2014

LibraryReads logoApril showers bring May flowers, and also a great crop of new books from LibraryReads! Here is the monthly list of forthcoming books librarians across the country recommend.

Book cover for The Storied Life of A.J. FikryThe Storied Life of A. J. Fikry
by Gabrielle Zevin
“A middle-aged bookseller mourning his lost wife, a feisty publisher’s rep and a charmingly precocious abandoned child come together on a small island off the New England coast in this utterly delightful novel of love and second chances.”
-Beth Mills, New Rochelle Public Library, New Rochelle, NY

Book cover for Frog Music by Emma DonoghueFrog Music
by Emma Donoghue
“Donoghue returns to historical fiction in this latest offering, based on the unsolved murder of Jenny Bonnet, a cross-dressing frog catcher with a mysterious past. Set in 1870s San Francisco, this brilliant book includes impeccable historical details, from a smallpox epidemic to period songs.”
-Diane Scholl, Batavia Public Library, IL

Book cover for And the Dark Sacred Night by Julia GlassAnd the Dark Sacred Night
by Julia Glass
“Four stars to Julia Glass for this, her best work since ‘Three Junes.’ We become reacquainted with old characters Malachy, Fenno and Walter and learn more about their life stories. The individuals are imperfectly human and perfectly drawn. A wonderful, highly recommended novel.”
-Kelly Currie, Delphi Public Library, Delphi, IN

Here is the rest of the list for your browsing and hold-placing pleasure!

The post Top Ten Books Librarians Love: The April List appeared first on DBRL Next.

Categories: More From DBRL...

One Woman’s Thoughts About Chick Lit

DBRL Next - March 21, 2014

Book cover for Life After Life by Kate AtkinsonWhy does the term Chick Lit rub me the wrong way?  Maybe it is because as a friend of mine recently said, “We don’t have Dude Lit.” I found myself asking this question because March is Women’s History Month. Female writers today, and historically, add much to our culture. One of my colleagues pointed out that four of the New York Times top 10 books of 2013 were written by women. These books are: Donna Tartt’s “The Goldfinch,” Kate Atkinson’s “Life After Life,” Rachel Kushner’s “The Flamethrowers” and Sheri Fink’s “Five Days at Memorial.”

Book cover for Bridget Jones's Diary by Helen FieldingChick Lit is a term that caught on in the 1990s and was attributed to books such as Helen Fielding’s “Bridget Jones’s Diary.” However, Chick Lit is a label that can change meanings depending on who is applying the label. For some, it is simply fun, light, fiction by and about females. Others see it more as the single working woman’s fiction. Whatever you want to call them, here are some books written by female authors. These are books any woman can appreciate.

Lives of Girls and Women” by Alice Munro
Time Flies” By Claire Cook
Get Lucky”by Katherine Center
Ladies’ Night” By Mary Kay Andrews

The post One Woman’s Thoughts About Chick Lit appeared first on DBRL Next.

Categories: More From DBRL...

One Woman’s Thoughts About Chick Lit

Next Book Buzz - March 21, 2014

Book cover for Life After Life by Kate AtkinsonWhy does the term Chick Lit rub me the wrong way?  Maybe it is because as a friend of mine recently said, “We don’t have Dude Lit.” I found myself asking this question because March is Women’s History Month. Female writers today, and historically, add much to our culture. One of my colleagues pointed out that four of the New York Times top 10 books of 2013 were written by women. These books are: Donna Tartt’s “The Goldfinch,” Kate Atkinson’s “Life After Life,” Rachel Kushner’s “The Flamethrowers” and Sheri Fink’s “Five Days at Memorial.”

Book cover for Bridget Jones's Diary by Helen FieldingChick Lit is a term that caught on in the 1990s and was attributed to books such as Helen Fielding’s “Bridget Jones’s Diary.” However, Chick Lit is a label that can change meanings depending on who is applying the label. For some, it is simply fun, light, fiction by and about females. Others see it more as the single working woman’s fiction. Whatever you want to call them, here are some books written by female authors. These are books any woman can appreciate.

Lives of Girls and Women” by Alice Munro
Time Flies” By Claire Cook
Get Lucky”by Katherine Center
Ladies’ Night” By Mary Kay Andrews

The post One Woman’s Thoughts About Chick Lit appeared first on DBRL Next.

Categories: Book Buzz

April 4 Registration Deadline for May SAT Exam

DBRLTeen - March 20, 2014

Standardized TestThe registration deadline for the May 3 SAT exam is Friday, April 4. Sign-up online.

If you would like to know more about testing locations, exam costs and fee waivers, please visit our  online guide to SAT/ACT preparation. The library also has a wide selection of printed ACT and SAT test guides for you to borrow.

Our most popular resource for test-takers, though, is LearningExpress Library. Through this website, you may take free online practice tests for the ACT or SAT exam. To access LearningExpress Library, you will need to login using your DBRL library card number. Your PIN is your birthdate (MMDDYYYY).  If you have questions or encounter difficulties logging in, please call  (800) 324-4806.

Finally, don’t forget to subscribe to our blog updates for regular reminders of upcoming test registration deadlines!

Originally published at April 4 Registration Deadline for May SAT Exam.

Categories: More From DBRL...

We’re Listening. Update on our Digital Branch Redesign

DBRL Next - March 19, 2014

DBRL logoDid you fill out an online survey about the library’s digital branch (www.dbrl.org) or participate in a focus group? If so, we thank you for providing us with some really valuable feedback we will use as we continue into the next phase of our website redesign. Many of you voiced similar concerns or questions, so we wanted to take the time to share some of what we learned and respond to some of your comments. (Note that the redesign process is still in the early stages – look for a new and improved dbrl.org in 2015.)

Less is more.
Many of you shared a real fondness for the resources available at dbrl.org, but you let us know that its text-heavy nature and busyness make it look cluttered and difficult to navigate.

No love for multiple log-ins.
I wish that we could tell you that we are developing a magic box where you can enter a single user name and password and have access to all of the third-party services we make available to you through our website, from the online catalog and interlibrary loan service to Zinio (downloadable magazines) and OverDrive (downloadable eBooks and audiobooks). The issue is that these tools and resources all come from different vendors, and they all work in different ways. Some of them require our users to create separate accounts to download their flashy magazines, and others need us to make sure that your library card number is in our database of active cardholders. For the most part, our vendors’ services don’t play nicely or neatly with each other. We hear (and share) your frustration, and we’ll continue to advocate on your behalf for better solutions. For now, if we want to be able to offer you eBooks and digital magazines (and we really want you to have access to downloadable materials), we have to settle for less than perfect in terms of their set-up and function. We do know that we can do a better job of creating clear FAQ pages for these services, and we will be working on that. Thanks for your support and patience.

Lose the library-ese.
There are some words we library folk love – reference, database, subject guide – but that mean little to those outside of the profession. One of our goals for the redesign will be to use everyday language to help you find the information you want and tools you need.

It’s not too late to share your feedback. Feel free to send your thoughts to pr@dbrl.org or post a comment here. Thank you! We look forward to making the digital branch an even more fun, interesting and useful place to visit.

The post We’re Listening. Update on our Digital Branch Redesign appeared first on DBRL Next.

Categories: More From DBRL...

New DVD: “Rewind This”

Center Aisle Cinema - March 19, 2014

rewindthis

We recently added “Rewind This” to the DBRL collection. The film currently has a rating of 100% from critics at Rotten Tomatoes. Here’s a synopsis from our catalog:

In the 1980s, videotape changed the world and laid the foundation for modern media culture. It traces the rise and fall of VHS from its heyday as the mainstream home video format to its current status as a nostalgic relic and prize to collectors who still cherish it. Featuring interviews with both filmmakers and enthusiasts from the VHS era.

Check out the film trailer or the official film site for more info.

Categories: More From DBRL...

2014 Teen Book Tournament: Final 4 Announced

DBRLTeen - March 18, 2014

VOTE NOW through March 24 for the final two contending titles!

March Madness 2014During the months of February and March, area young adults have eliminated 28 books to determine their top four favorite titles in the March Madness Teen Book Tournament. Below is a list of contenders chosen from these preliminary rounds of voting. If you are just joining us, here’s a recap of how you can participate for a chance to win a free Barnes and Noble gift card, or an autographed copy of “Legend” by Marie Lu.

How the March Madness Teen Book Tournament Works:

Through a series of votes, we are narrowing the library’s list of the 32 most popular teen books to one grand champion. Prize winners will be announced on April 2 when we announce our book tournament champion.

  • Round 1: Voting complete for the Sweet 16.
  • Round 2: Voting complete for the Elite 8.
  • Round 3: Voting complete for the Final 4.
  • Round 4: VOTE NOW through March 24 for the final two contending titles.
  • Round 5: Vote March 25-31 for the book tournament champion.
  • April 2: The champion is announced!

All votes must be in by Monday, March 24 at 5 p.m. You may vote online at teens.dbrl.org or pick up a paper ballot at one of our three branch locations. Limit one ballot per person, per round.  Winning titles from this round of competition will be announced next Tuesday, March 25.

March Madness Teen Book Tournament: Final 4
  1. The Hobbit” by J.R.R. Tolkien
  2. Holes” by Louis Sachar
  3. The Maze Runner” by James Dashne
  4. Legend” by Marie Lu

Originally published at 2014 Teen Book Tournament: Final 4 Announced.

Categories: More From DBRL...

New DVD: “More than Honey”

Center Aisle Cinema - March 17, 2014

morethanhoney

We recently added “More than Honey” to the DBRL collection. The film currently has a rating of 100% from critics at Rotten Tomatoes. Here’s a synopsis from our catalog:

An unprecedented global examination of endangered honeybees spanning from California to Switzerland, China and Australia. With all the hallmarks of a great nature documentary, the film employs the latest in cinematic technology to observe phenomena undetectable by normal eyesight, beautifully portraying the dramatic story of the disappearance of millions of bees in the last decade.

Check out the film trailer or the official film site for more info.

Categories: More From DBRL...

The Gentleman Recommends: Donald Antrim

Next Book Buzz - March 17, 2014

Book cover for Mr. Robinson for a Better WorldDonald Antrim has been called a genius, and in 2013 (along with one of my most favorite writers), he was given the 625,000-dollar grant the MacArthur Foundation bequeaths to all geniuses. As far as I know (Antrim has yet to respond to my passionate, nearly polite pleas that he take one of those twenty question online IQ tests and forward me the results WITHOUT DOCTORING THEM), he deserves the unfathomable wealth, prestige and groupies such an award bestows. But I hear his fanciful imagination is one of his genius-y strengths, and I wonder, for certainly that isn’t the strength on display in “Elect Mr. Robinson For a Better World.” Said slice of propaganda is little more than an exquisitely written, chilling and accurate glimpse into the muggy, gator-blood pumping heart of present day Florida.

The titular narrator’s community is populated by residents that have taken to digging moats around their houses and filling them with broken glass, sharpened bamboo or water moccasins. Their park is packed with landmines, and taxpayers have voted to close the local school and occupy the building with a factory that turns coral into jewelry. Despite these everyday challenges, Mr. Robinson doesn’t craft the typical political tract. He never beats you over the head with policies or empty rhetoric, instead counting on the reader’s wisdom to deem him fit for office by the time they’ve completed his grim and propulsive tale.

Mr. Robinson is a former teacher who lost his job when the school was closed. He shares the dream of most displaced teachers: to start a school in his basement next to his scale-model medieval torture chamber and have students assist him in crafting political advertisements for his eventual mayoral run. This is a man overflowing with political talents. When the previous mayor made the perhaps hasty decision to launch Stinger missiles into the botanical garden, Mr. Robinson, drawing from his considerable knowledge of the history of torture, suggests he be drawn and quartered, and he has the know-how and follow-through to lead his fellow citizens in dismembering the man with fishing line and automobiles. While this knowledge is obviously a necessary component for holding political office, perhaps some might worry as to the lack of a softer side. Robinson nails that too: he feels the pieces of the former mayor deserve a distinguished burial and so keeps them in his freezer until he can devise the perfect send-off. (Which, of course, involves Egyptian rituals.) But maybe the voter is sympathetic to the arts. When the citizenry decides to use library books to detonate the hidden bombs in their park, Robinson takes the initiative to go in after the intact tomes. Plus, a new-age guru reveals that his inner animal is a buffalo, and although that means he nearly drowns during a spirit commune with his wife’s inner animal, a coelacanth (ancient weird fish), one cannot argue against the buffalo being well-suited to the rigors of modern politics.

As they say in Florida, two gators with one python, Antrim has convinced me Mr. Robinson would be, for a Florida town, an appropriate mayor; and also Florida is a scary place crammed with shuttered schools, swamps, suburban moats and psychotically over-zealous security guards.

The post The Gentleman Recommends: Donald Antrim appeared first on DBRL Next.

Categories: Book Buzz

The Gentleman Recommends: Donald Antrim

DBRL Next - March 17, 2014

Book cover for Mr. Robinson for a Better WorldDonald Antrim has been called a genius, and in 2013 (along with one of my most favorite writers), he was given the 625,000-dollar grant the MacArthur Foundation bequeaths to all geniuses. As far as I know (Antrim has yet to respond to my passionate, nearly polite pleas that he take one of those twenty question online IQ tests and forward me the results WITHOUT DOCTORING THEM), he deserves the unfathomable wealth, prestige and groupies such an award bestows. But I hear his fanciful imagination is one of his genius-y strengths, and I wonder, for certainly that isn’t the strength on display in “Elect Mr. Robinson For a Better World.” Said slice of propaganda is little more than an exquisitely written, chilling and accurate glimpse into the muggy, gator-blood pumping heart of present day Florida.

The titular narrator’s community is populated by residents that have taken to digging moats around their houses and filling them with broken glass, sharpened bamboo or water moccasins. Their park is packed with landmines, and taxpayers have voted to close the local school and occupy the building with a factory that turns coral into jewelry. Despite these everyday challenges, Mr. Robinson doesn’t craft the typical political tract. He never beats you over the head with policies or empty rhetoric, instead counting on the reader’s wisdom to deem him fit for office by the time they’ve completed his grim and propulsive tale.

Mr. Robinson is a former teacher who lost his job when the school was closed. He shares the dream of most displaced teachers: to start a school in his basement next to his scale-model medieval torture chamber and have students assist him in crafting political advertisements for his eventual mayoral run. This is a man overflowing with political talents. When the previous mayor made the perhaps hasty decision to launch Stinger missiles into the botanical garden, Mr. Robinson, drawing from his considerable knowledge of the history of torture, suggests he be drawn and quartered, and he has the know-how and follow-through to lead his fellow citizens in dismembering the man with fishing line and automobiles. While this knowledge is obviously a necessary component for holding political office, perhaps some might worry as to the lack of a softer side. Robinson nails that too: he feels the pieces of the former mayor deserve a distinguished burial and so keeps them in his freezer until he can devise the perfect send-off. (Which, of course, involves Egyptian rituals.) But maybe the voter is sympathetic to the arts. When the citizenry decides to use library books to detonate the hidden bombs in their park, Robinson takes the initiative to go in after the intact tomes. Plus, a new-age guru reveals that his inner animal is a buffalo, and although that means he nearly drowns during a spirit commune with his wife’s inner animal, a coelacanth (ancient weird fish), one cannot argue against the buffalo being well-suited to the rigors of modern politics.

As they say in Florida, two gators with one python, Antrim has convinced me Mr. Robinson would be, for a Florida town, an appropriate mayor; and also Florida is a scary place crammed with shuttered schools, swamps, suburban moats and psychotically over-zealous security guards.

The post The Gentleman Recommends: Donald Antrim appeared first on DBRL Next.

Categories: More From DBRL...

2014 Gateway and Truman Award Predictions

Teen Book Buzz - March 16, 2014

The Gateway Readers Award honors a young adult book as selected by high school students, while the Truman Readers Award is chosen by junior high students. Even though these awards are administered by the Missouri Association of School Librarians (MASL), it is the responsibility of Missouri teens to choose the actual winner.  Based on circulation figures throughout our library system, DBRLTeen predicts that the following books will be recognized as this year’s top titles:

Predicted Gateway Readers Award winners2014 Truman Award Predictions

  • First Place: “Divergent” by Veronica Roth
  • Second Place: “Delirium” by Lauren Oliver
  • Third Place: “Bitter End” by Jennifer Brown

Predicted Truman Readers Award winners:

The actual award winners will be announced at the MASL Spring Conference in mid-April.  Subscribe to our email updates to have the results delivered directly to your inbox!

Originally published at 2014 Gateway and Truman Award Predictions.

Categories: Book Buzz

2014 Gateway and Truman Award Predictions

DBRLTeen - March 16, 2014

The Gateway Readers Award honors a young adult book as selected by high school students, while the Truman Readers Award is chosen by junior high students. Even though these awards are administered by the Missouri Association of School Librarians (MASL), it is the responsibility of Missouri teens to choose the actual winner.  Based on circulation figures throughout our library system, DBRLTeen predicts that the following books will be recognized as this year’s top titles:

Predicted Gateway Readers Award winners2014 Truman Award Predictions

  • First Place: “Divergent” by Veronica Roth
  • Second Place: “Delirium” by Lauren Oliver
  • Third Place: “Bitter End” by Jennifer Brown

Predicted Truman Readers Award winners:

The actual award winners will be announced at the MASL Spring Conference in mid-April.  Subscribe to our email updates to have the results delivered directly to your inbox!

Originally published at 2014 Gateway and Truman Award Predictions.

Categories: More From DBRL...

Visit the Digital Public Library of America

DBRL Next - March 14, 2014

DPLA logoI love big ideas, particularly the ones that seem kind of impossible and insane, but noble and worthwhile. When I first heard about the group of folks trying to create The Digital Public Library of America, I was completely intrigued. Here is the concept statement that caught my attention:

The Digital Public Library of America (DPLA) will make the cultural and scientific heritage of humanity available, free of charge, to all.

Achieving such a radically awesome goal requires cooperation from archives, educational institutions, museums and libraries and the work of hundreds and hundreds of passionate volunteers, as well as generous funding from donors. The DPLA launched in April 2013, bringing together digital assets from many separate entities and providing a portal for searching across what had been isolated islands of information. The DPLA’s collections are growing all of the time, moving the organization closer to making their big idea a reality.

To put it simply, the DPLA is incredibly cool. The portal provides access to more than 5,500,000 photographs, manuscripts, books, sounds and moving images, as well as some interesting ways to search them. You can look for items by place, viewing collections related to Missouri, for example. Or you can look at items related to a certain point in history, like the Great Depression or the year you were born.

The openness of the project is also pretty amazing. The DPLA challenges developers to “make something awesome.” DPLA can be used by software developers, researchers and others to create learning environments, discovery tools and engaging apps. Not all of these apps are purely educational (See the Twitter bot built to post randomly selected historical images of cats from DPLA’s collection), but they help show the range of what can be done when collections and data are made open.

Whether you are a student, a history buff, a tech geek or just a person with a strong sense of curiosity, you must check out the DPLA. One warning: be prepared to fall down the rabbit hole. It is easy to lose yourself among the images and illuminated manuscripts. Or historical cat photos, if that’s your thing.

The post Visit the Digital Public Library of America appeared first on DBRL Next.

Categories: More From DBRL...

Docs Around Town: Mar. 14 – 20

Center Aisle Cinema - March 13, 2014

punksinger

March 15: “Fly Fishing Film Tour” 1:30 p.m. at Ragtag. (via)
March 20:
 “The Punk Singer” 5:30 p.m. at Ragtag. (via)

Categories: More From DBRL...

Upcoming Teen Contests

DBRLTeen - March 13, 2014
Painting StudentDesign a Bookmark Contest

Help us get ready for Summer Reading by designing an original bookmark based on the teen theme, “Spark a Reaction.” Winners’ artwork from each library will appear on bookmarks to be distributed late spring through summer. Please design two-dimensional artwork using crayons, markers or any other medium or create it on the computer. Photography is also acceptable, as long as it is your own! You can download an entry form, or pick one up at one of our three branch locations or bookmobile stops. Entry deadline is Monday, March 31. 

Callaway County Youth Poetry Contest

As part of National Poetry Month in April, we invite Callaway County youth to submit original poems with a chance to win an award and have your work displayed at the Callaway County Public Library, Central Bank and at teens.dbrl.org. Awards will be given in three age categories: 5-8, 9-12 and 13-18. You can download an entry form, or pick one up at the library or bookmobile. Entries are due April 14. An awards ceremony will be held at 6 p.m. on May 1 at the Callaway County Public Library. Co-sponsored by the Auxvasse Creative Arts Program.

Doodle 4 Google Competition

Irish Google Doodle WinnerBefore there was an airplane, there were doodles of cool flying machines. And before there was a submarine, there were doodles of magical underwater sea explorers. Since the beginning of time, ideas big and small, practical and playful, have started out as doodles. And we’re ready for more. One talented young artist (grades K-12) will see his or her artwork on the Google homepage and receive a $30,000 college scholarship and a $50,000 Google for Education technology grant for his or her school. Closing date for entries is next Thursday, March 20th. Visit google.com/doodle4google to learn more.

Photo credits:
Painting Student by Southwest School of Art via Flickr. Used under creative commons license.
Ireland’s 2012 Doodle 4 Google winner, Patrick Horan. Courtesy of The Sociable.

Originally published at Upcoming Teen Contests.

Categories: More From DBRL...
Copyright © 2014 Daniel Boone Regional Library