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Vote for the 2014 One Read Book!

DBRL Next - April 14, 2014

logo-web1April elections aren’t just about school boards and city councils. Each year the Daniel Boone Regional Library asks area readers to help choose that year’s One Read book. One Read is a community-wide reading program that invites adults in Mid-Missouri to read the same book over the summer and then attend programs based on that book during the month of September.

Between now and May 2, cast your vote for either “Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk” by Ben Fountain or “The Boys in the Boat: Nine Americans and Their Epic Quest for Gold at the 1936 Berlin Olympics” by Daniel Brown.

Learn more about these titles and cast your vote at oneread.org!

The post Vote for the 2014 One Read Book! appeared first on DBRL Next.

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Vote for the 2014 One Read Book!

Next Book Buzz - April 14, 2014

logo-web1April elections aren’t just about school boards and city councils. Each year the Daniel Boone Regional Library asks area readers to help choose that year’s One Read book. One Read is a community-wide reading program that invites adults in Mid-Missouri to read the same book over the summer and then attend programs based on that book during the month of September.

Between now and May 2, cast your vote for either “Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk” by Ben Fountain or “The Boys in the Boat: Nine Americans and Their Epic Quest for Gold at the 1936 Berlin Olympics” by Daniel Brown.

Learn more about these titles and cast your vote at oneread.org!

The post Vote for the 2014 One Read Book! appeared first on DBRL Next.

Categories: Book Buzz

One Read Vote 2014

One Read - April 14, 2014
Vote for the Next One Read Book April 14-May 2

Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk by Ben Fountain

The Boys in the Boat: Nine Americans and Their Epic Quest for Gold at the 1936 Berlin Olympics
by Daniel Brown Note: There is a poll embedded within this post, please visit the site to participate in this post's poll.

The post One Read Vote 2014 appeared first on One READ.

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Learn More About the 2014 One Read Finalists

One Read - April 14, 2014

The One Read reading panel narrowed the list of more than 120 book suggestions for the 2014 program to two top contenders. Between now and May 2, cast your vote for either “Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk” by Ben Fountain or “The Boys in the Boat: Nine Americans and Their Epic Quest for Gold at the 1936 Berlin Olympics” by Daniel Brown.

Billy Lynn's Long Halftime Walk by Ben Fountain“Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk” by Ben Fountain

Embedded journalists capture and widely broadcast a heroic firefight between U.S. soldiers and a group of insurgents in Iraq. This satire follows the surviving members of the Bravo Squad during their final stop in a two-week, Army-organized series of PR stunts – participation in the half-time show at a Dallas Cowboys football game. By turns bleak and darkly comic, the story examines the huge divide between the realities of war in Iraq and the perceptions of that war in America.

Preview the first few pages of “Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk.”

More information:

The Boys in the Boat by Daniel Brown“The Boys in the Boat: Nine Americans and Their Epic Quest for Gold at the 1936 Berlin Olympics” by Daniel Brown

An uplifting and fast-paced Cinderella story, this nonfiction work describes the journey of nine working class young men from the University of Washington as they row their way out of obscurity and into the gold-medal race at the 1936 Olympic games in Hitler’s Berlin. The story of poor, twice-orphaned Joe Rantz anchors this cinematic tale of passion and perseverance set against the struggles of the Great Depression and a looming second World War.

Preview the first few pages of “The Boys in the Boat.”

More information:

 

The post Learn More About the 2014 One Read Finalists appeared first on One READ.

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Resources for Green Thumbs at Your Library

DBRL Next - April 11, 2014

Book cover for Plantiful by Kristin GreenIt happens every year. The daytime temperatures start to creep above 50 or 60 degrees, and I’m suddenly overspending at the local garden center, filling my cart with a ridiculous number of pansies, their cheerful, bright faces turned towards the sun. I don’t have a green thumb. Half of what I plant each year dies from neglect, mismanagement or simple bad luck, but I still can’t keep myself from digging hopefully in the dirt each spring.

For gardeners and gardener wannabes, the library has plenty of books, programs and online resources for inspiration and education.

For ideas in your inbox, sign up for our monthly home and garden newsletter. Each month you’ll receive a list of 10 recently published titles, and the list always includes some new gardening books like “The Know Maintenance Perennial Garden” by Roy Diblik and “Plantiful” by Kristin Green.

Search our online program guide with the keyword “garden” and you’ll typically find one or two events scheduled for the coming months. At the Callaway County Public Library on April 17 at 6:30 p.m., you can learn about transplanting trees and seedlings (particularly helpful if your child brought home some sort of mystery tree for Arbor Day). And at 7:00 p.m. on May 28 at the Columbia Public Library, you can attend a garden and plant nutrition program to learn more about soil, compost and organic fertilizers.

If you want to investigate some local gardening resources, including educational opportunities and community organizations, check out our Sustainable Gardening and Farming subject guide, a collection of recommended links and online resources from our staff.

Happy planting!

The post Resources for Green Thumbs at Your Library appeared first on DBRL Next.

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Docs Around Town: Apr. 11 – Apr. 17

Center Aisle Cinema - April 10, 2014

girlsintheband

April 14:The Girls in the Band” 6:00 p.m. at Ragtag, free. (via)

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New DVD: “Jimi Hendrix: Hear My Train A Comin’”

Center Aisle Cinema - April 9, 2014

jimihendrixhearmytrain

We recently added “Jimi Hendrix: Hear My Train A Comin’” to the DBRL collection. The film played last year on PBS and currently has a rating of 100% from critics at Rotten Tomatoes. Here’s a synopsis from our catalog:

Unveils previously unseen performance footage and home movies taken by Hendrix and drummer Mitch Mitchell while sourcing an extensive archive of photographs, drawings, family letters, and more to provide new insight into the musician’s personality and genius. Recently uncovered film footage of Hendrix at the 1968 Miami Pop Festival is among the previously unseen treasures featured.

Check out the film trailer or the official film site for more info.

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Bookmarks: What’s Saving Your Page?

Next Book Buzz - April 9, 2014

Bookmarks are thought to have been used since at least the end of the medieval period, but one of the first references to their use involves the presentation of a silk bookmark to Queen Elizabeth I of England (circa 1584). People use all sorts of different things as bookmarks, everything from old receipts to love letters. Lauren, one of our librarians at the Columbia Public Library, said she attended a conference where four or five librarians admitted to having found bacon in a book! How do you save your place in a book? Let us know in the comments! (And please don’t put bacon in our books.)

I have been using leftover paint chips from a project as bookmarks. This color is “Radiant Orchid.” Currently reading: “The Creative Habit” by Twyla Tharp.

1 Katie

Rob is using his car title at the moment. Currently reading: “The Exegesis of Philip K. Dick.” (Editor’s note: This was a patron’s personal book. Using important documents as bookmarks in library books is not a good idea.)

Photo of a book and bookmark

This adorable handmade creature marks Angela’s page. Currently reading: “Every Day” by David Levithan.

Photo of a book and bookmark

Barb had lots of bookmarking to do. Luckily she had plenty of these tiny post-its! Currently reading: “The Help” by Kathryn Stockett.

Photo of a book and bookmark

Althea’s beautiful bookmark. Currently reading: “Adé” by Rebecca Walker.

Photo of a book and bookmark

Brandy loves sloths so much that one of her coworkers made her this bookmark.

Photo of a book and bookmark

Rosie the Riveter never stops working, even as a bookmark! Brian is using a gallery guide from a recent trip to Crystal Bridges American Art Museum as his bookmark. Currently reading: “The Upcycle” By William McDonough.

Photo of a book and bookmark

Hilary uses her pets as bookmarks! (Or maybe they use her?) Currently reading: “Adventures in Yarn Farming” by Barbara Parry.

Photo of a cat as bookmark

Eric was using his Ha Ha Tonka concert ticket, until he found a postcard from Romania in this used textbook. Currently reading: “Interpersonal Process in Therapy” by Edward Teyber and Faith Holmes McClure.

Photo of a book and bookmark

The Warrior card from a Xultun tarot deck guards Kelsey’s spot in her book. Currently reading: “Perdido Street Station” by China Miéville.

10 Kelsey

Ida’s daughter made her this cross-stitched Hunger Games bookmark.

Hunger Games bookmark

And here’s a box of long lost bookmarks in the Columbia Public Library’s Circulation Department.
box of lost bookmarks

So, what’s in your book?

The post Bookmarks: What’s Saving Your Page? appeared first on DBRL Next.

Categories: Book Buzz

Bookmarks: What’s Saving Your Page?

DBRL Next - April 9, 2014

Bookmarks are thought to have been used since at least the end of the medieval period, but one of the first references to their use involves the presentation of a silk bookmark to Queen Elizabeth I of England (circa 1584). People use all sorts of different things as bookmarks, everything from old receipts to love letters. Lauren, one of our librarians at the Columbia Public Library, said she attended a conference where four or five librarians admitted to having found bacon in a book! How do you save your place in a book? Let us know in the comments! (And please don’t put bacon in our books.)

I have been using leftover paint chips from a project as bookmarks. This color is “Radiant Orchid.” Currently reading: “The Creative Habit” by Twyla Tharp.

1 Katie

Rob is using his car title at the moment. Currently reading: “The Exegesis of Philip K. Dick.” (Editor’s note: This was a patron’s personal book. Using important documents as bookmarks in library books is not a good idea.)

Photo of a book and bookmark

This adorable handmade creature marks Angela’s page. Currently reading: “Every Day” by David Levithan.

Photo of a book and bookmark

Barb had lots of bookmarking to do. Luckily she had plenty of these tiny post-its! Currently reading: “The Help” by Kathryn Stockett.

Photo of a book and bookmark

Althea’s beautiful bookmark. Currently reading: “Adé” by Rebecca Walker.

Photo of a book and bookmark

Brandy loves sloths so much that one of her coworkers made her this bookmark.

Photo of a book and bookmark

Rosie the Riveter never stops working, even as a bookmark! Brian is using a gallery guide from a recent trip to Crystal Bridges American Art Museum as his bookmark. Currently reading: “The Upcycle” By William McDonough.

Photo of a book and bookmark

Hilary uses her pets as bookmarks! (Or maybe they use her?) Currently reading: “Adventures in Yarn Farming” by Barbara Parry.

Photo of a cat as bookmark

Eric was using his Ha Ha Tonka concert ticket, until he found a postcard from Romania in this used textbook. Currently reading: “Interpersonal Process in Therapy” by Edward Teyber and Faith Holmes McClure.

Photo of a book and bookmark

The Warrior card from a Xultun tarot deck guards Kelsey’s spot in her book. Currently reading: “Perdido Street Station” by China Miéville.

10 Kelsey

Ida’s daughter made her this cross-stitched Hunger Games bookmark.

Hunger Games bookmark

And here’s a box of long lost bookmarks in the Columbia Public Library’s Circulation Department.
box of lost bookmarks

So, what’s in your book?

The post Bookmarks: What’s Saving Your Page? appeared first on DBRL Next.

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