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A Healthy Mind

DBRL Next - June 24, 2016

World Tai Chi Day, photo by Brian Robinson via FlickrAt one point in my life, when I was feeling unmoored, I came across the book “PMS, Perimenopause, and You,” by Lori Futterman. Now what does a healthy mind have to do with PMS (premenstrual syndrome) and perimenopause, you ask?  Well, included in this helpful book, which takes a holistic approach to this stage in a woman’s life, is a very good definition of what it means to be healthy. And I quote Futterman: “You are healthy if you are able to do the things you want to, have a strong sense of calm, and are able to face unforeseen events that may be stressful with resolve and resourcefulness. You may achieve inner peace through meditation, religion, reflection, study of philosophy, or visualization.”

I found this definition so illuminating that I copied it and reread it over the years, whenever I needed reminding. Notice she emphasizes the need for a contemplative or meditation practice as a means to gain inner calm and strength, claiming it will aid in the ability to live life from a steady, confident and centered place. With that assertion in mind, I want to alert you to a program being offered and resources available here at the library, which focus on the development and maintenance of mental well-being through meditation. Fortunately, there are many types of meditation “practice,” which means there is something for everyone, depending on life approach, personal preference and ability.

First up, the library is offering a program on Tai Chi, both at the Columbia and Callaway County library locations. Tai chi can be described as meditation in motion, and it is an ancient, slow-motion Chinese martial art. This body-mind practice is suitable for all ages and levels of physical ability, and it addresses many components of physical fitness (muscle strength, flexibility, balance, etc.), but one of its important aims is to foster a calm and tranquil mind. Tai chi can also be helpful for a host of medical conditions, including arthritis, heart disease, hypertension, stroke and sleep problems, among others. Clearly tai chi has a lot to offer, and if you’d like to give it a try, please plan to attend one of the above mentioned programs.

Meditate, photo by Caleb Roenigk via FlickrLike tai chi, yoga can also be described as a form of meditation in motion. This practice of physical postures combined with conscious breathing originated in ancient India, and it aims to integrate body, mind and spirit. Historically its purpose was to move one toward attaining enlightenment, but even if this is not a “goal” for you, there are many benefits to be realized from a yoga practice. Physical benefits include increased muscle strength, flexibility and protection from injury. Mental benefits include increased mental clarity and calmness, a greater ability to focus and concentrate attention, and it can also aid in reducing anxiety and/or depression. Yoga is also suitable for people of all ages and levels of physical ability.

Sitting meditation, another ancient practice, can be undertaken with the aim of building inner strength and tranquility. There are numerous forms of meditation that employ different techniques, but for the same purpose — to train the mind to pay attention to what is happening in the present moment, and thereby become aware of the mind’s behavior and tendencies. Research has shown how meditation affects the brain and has uncovered many benefits, including improving the ability to focus and concentrate attention, improving memory, reducing stress, anxiety and depression, enhancing creativity and developing compassion. That is quite a lot to offer!

This pithy little book, “Start Here Now: an Open-hearted Guide to the Path and Practice of Meditation” by Susan Pivers, provides straightforward explanations and instructions that demystify meditation (in case you were mystified), making it very accessible to beginners.  There is a treasure trove of books here at the library, both in print and audio, with explanations and instructions on how to meditate. And there are a few organizations in our local area that offer group sitting opportunities and meditation instruction, for those interested in taking a class:  Show Me Dharma, Mindfulness Practice Center and Silent Mind-Open Heart.

“Even when in the midst of disturbance, the stillness of the mind can offer sanctuary.”
― Stephen Richards, The Ultimate Cosmic Ordering Meditation

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Reader Review: The Starter Wife

DBRL Next - June 23, 2016

the starter wifeThe Starter Wife” is about Gracie, a woman in a situation where she really doesn’t belong, fit in, or want to be. She tries with somewhat sincere effort to be a part of the Hollywood “Wife of” scene, and we readers get a peek with clarity, caring and pretty consistent humor! After a shocking text message, her life begins a journey to…she doesn’t know where! I liked Gracie and the narrative, which shared an interesting time in her life. This book is well written and moves with ease from page to page, and I really liked getting a look at the challenges and strife of a Hollywood wife’s life — it looks pretty, but it’s not.

Three words that describe this book: wife, life, Hollywood

You might want to pick this book up if: you like to read clever books, like to learn about different types of lives and, well, just pick it up cause it is good!!

-Pamela

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Blood Relations: Docs Featuring Families In Crisis

DBRL Next - June 22, 2016

tarnation imageFamilies can go into crisis mode when faced with stressful situations. How will family members deal with the situation and how will it transform their relationships with each other? Check out these docs that focus on families in a state of crisis.

tarnationTarnation” (2005)

Part documentary, part narrative fiction, part home movie, and part acid trip. Faced with the haunting remnants of his past, including a family legacy of mental illness, abuse and neglect, Jonathan Caouette returns home to aid in his schizophrenic mother’s recovery.

dear zacharyDear Zachary” (2008)

Filmmaker Kurt Kuenne begins making a film for Zachary, son of his oldest friend who was murdered by Zachary’s mother. The film’s focus shifts to Zachary’s grandparents as they fight to win custody of Zachary from the woman who took their son’s life.

prodigal sonsProdigal Sons” (2010)

Returning home to Montana for her high school reunion, filmmaker Kimberly Reed (previously the school quarterback and now a transgender woman) hopes for reconciliation with her long-estranged adopted brother. But along the way they face challenges no one could imagine.

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Reader Review: Lust & Wonder

DBRL Next - June 21, 2016

book cover for lust and wonderI really enjoy Augusten Burroughs, and I like hearing him read his own books. He manages a compelling mix of vulnerability and strength. Even when he screws up his life or makes choices he regrets later, he is able to examine the inner monologue and present it for the world to view. “Lust & Wonder” seems a good reflection on what I’d call regular adulting. He had a grown-up and mature relationship that wasn’t horrible, but it also wasn’t good, and he describes it in some detail. His reflections should have a universal tune to them for anyone reflecting on one’s own relationships. He describes his wild love for his dogs and the sadness of dividing custody as a relationship fails. He focuses on how his past continues to affect his present and highlights the moments when he tries to sort out whether feelings he’s having are appropriate to the situation or are really about a response to something that happened in his past. While I don’t have anything like the serious abuse and deep level addiction issues that Burroughs has, the analysis of whether a response is right for a situation applies even to someone without as much history.

Three words that describe this book: vulnerable, adult, engaging

You might want to pick this book up if: You’ve enjoyed other books by this author.
You want to hear an author read his own memoir. You are struggling with the fizzling of a long-term relationship.

-Anonymous

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Cosplay Costume Con on August 8

DBRLTeen - June 21, 2016

Cosplay Banner 1

Cosplay Costume Con
Monday, August 8 › 6-8 p.m.
Columbia Public Library, Friends Room

Dress up as your favorite character, be it superhero, anime, sci-fi or your own original persona. Photos and registration will begin at 6 p.m., followed at 6:30 p.m. by the runway show. We’ll award prizes for the best costumes and characterization in different age categories, so be ready to show off your cosplay game! All ages.

Photos by Flickr User Marnie Joyce. Used under Creative Commons license.

Originally published at Cosplay Costume Con on August 8.

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The Gentleman Recommends: Arthur Bradford

DBRL Next - June 20, 2016

Book cover for Turtle Face and Beyond by Arthur BradfordWhile I’ll recommend the work of a rascal if that rascal’s work is great enough, there are enough brilliant and kind writers out there that I’ve rarely had to resort to that. How do I know if they’re kind? The same way you find out if anyone is kind – you google them, show a picture of them to your neighbor’s hounds, and then carefully observe the hounds’ reactions. With this month’s recommendation, I needn’t confirm the internet’s verdict with a hound test. Arthur Bradford’s gentlemanly nature shows in the big-hearted way he renders his characters and because the good sir is dedicated to helping people. In addition to some film work and two incredible collections of short stories, he’s worked at the Texas School for the Blind, been a co-director for Camp Jabberwocky (a camp for people with disabilities), and he’s currently working in a juvenile detention center. He’s not your typical literary superstar who spends all his time eating figs, drinking brandy and bidding for antique typewriters on eBay.

Bradford writes without the sort of fanciful verbiage, flowery descriptions and unnecessary addenda that this immaculately groomed (wearing the casual cummerbund, because it’s Friday) gentleman so vigorously gravitates toward. His sentences are direct, and they’re hilarious. His characters make mistakes, sometimes constantly, but they’re not trying to hurt anyone, and they’re often trying to help someone.

Turtleface and Beyond” is his most recent collection of short stories, and it’s awesome. The titular Turtleface is an unfortunate young man who, after drunkenly deciding to dive from a cliff to impress his canoeing companions, dives face first into a turtle. Both he and the turtle are in bad shape, but Georgie (the soft-hearted narrator of the entire collection) decides to slap some duct tape on the turtle and nurse it back to health.

There’s a story about an under-dressed man travelling with friend to a wedding. They find a man ailing at the side of the road. He’s been bitten by a snake. He convinces Georgie to suck the poison from his leg. George reluctantly attempts it and ruins an outfit that was already insufficiently formal. There’s one where a reluctant Georgie is cajoled into assisting a boss’s decline into total depravity. There’s one called “The LSD and the Baby.”

When “The Gentleman Recommends” blog post series was first conceived, my primary intent was to highlight books that I like, but I also wanted to further the agenda of the gentleman. That agenda: constant politeness, regular charity, enough hat-tipping/doffing to cause calluses on the fingers you use to tip/doff your hat, always bowing when introduced to someone or when someone you know does something worthy of a bow, and regular snack breaks. I didn’t know that what I really wanted was to recommend a writer who had written a story called “The LSD and the Baby.”

If you like “Turtleface and Beyond,” support the gentlemen’s agenda and buy Bradford’s first collection, “Dogwalker.”

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Second Summer Reading Gift Card Winner!

DBRL Next - June 19, 2016

TrophyCongratulations to Teresa, a Columbia Public Library patron, for winning our second Adult Summer Reading prize drawing.  She is the recipient of a $25 Barnes & Noble gift card.

All it takes to be entered into our weekly drawings is to sign up for Adult Summer Reading. You can do this at any of our branch locations or Bookmobile stops or register online.  Also, don’t forget that submitting book reviews increases your chances of winning.  There are plenty of chances left to win this summer, so keep those reviews coming.

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Top Ten Books Librarians Love: The July 2016 List

DBRL Next - June 17, 2016

Library Reads Logo

It’s hot and humid, and the LibraryReads recommendations list for July is dripping with twisty, suspenseful and sometimes genre-blending thrillers! Kidnapping, murder on a cruise ship, a mysterious death in an Amish community and a reality show gone seriously awry – there are so many good stories to stow in your beach bag. Here are the top 10 titles publishing next month that librarians across the country love.

Book cover for Dark Matter by Blake CrouchDark Matter” by Blake Crouch

“Once on the fast-track to academic stardom, Jason Dessen finds his quiet family life and career upended when a stranger kidnaps him. Suddenly Jason’s idle “what-ifs” become panicked “what-nows,” as the humble quantum physics professor from a small Chicago college gets to explore the roads not taken with a mind-bending invention that opens doors to other worlds. This fun science fiction thriller is also a thoughtful page-turner with heart that should appeal to fans of Harlan Coben.” – Elizabeth Eastin, Rogers Memorial Library, Southampton, NY

Book cover for The Woman in Cabin 10The Woman in Cabin 10” by Ruth Ware

“An intruder in the middle of the night leaves Lo Blacklock feeling vulnerable. Trying to shake off her fears, she hopes her big break of covering the maiden voyage of the luxury cruise ship, the Aurora, will help. The first night of the voyage changes everything. What did she really see in the water and who was the woman in the cabin next door? The claustrophobic feeling of being on a ship and the twists and turns of who, and what, to believe keep you on the edge of your seat. Count on this being one of the hot reads this summer!” – Joseph Jones, Cuyahoga County Public Library, OH

Book cover for The Last OneThe Last One” by Alexandra Oliva

“The Last One tells the story of twelve contestants who are sent to the wilderness in a Survivor-like reality show. But while they’re away, the world changes completely and what is real and what is not begins to blur. It’s post-apocalyptic literary fiction at it’s best. With a fast pace and a wry sense of humor, this is the kind of book that will appeal to readers of literary fiction and genre fiction alike. It points out the absurdity of reality television without feeling condescending. As the readers wake up to the realities of a new world, it becomes difficult to put down.” – Leah White, Ela Area Public Library, Lake Zurich, IL

Here is the rest of the July list for your holds-placing pleasure:

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Mega Gamer Eve on July 8

DBRLTeen - June 17, 2016

SentinelsDo you love games and gaming? Have you ever wondered how they were created? On July 8, the Columbia Public Library will welcome game developers Christopher Badell, Jay Sparks and others.

From 4:30-5:30 p.m. we’ll host a Q&A session with our game-creator guests. Then, from 6-9 p.m. there will be a special after-hours gaming night. We’ll have dozens of games like Sentinels of the Multiverse, Tao and Pandemic, but feel free to bring games you’d like to share, including Magic: The Gathering. Adults and children’s ages 10 and older.

Originally published at Mega Gamer Eve on July 8.

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Reader Review: Jane Steele

DBRL Next - June 16, 2016

jane steeleMore a “Jane Eyre” tribute than an adaptation, “Jane Steele” tells the story of a Victorian woman, Jane Steele, who is inspired by her own reading of “Jane Eyre” to write a memoir. Like Eyre, Steele is orphaned at a young age, sent by a cruel aunt to a bleak boarding school led by a tyrant, and then becomes governess to the impish ward of a brooding and mysterious man. Jane Steele, however, handles things in a much different way than her literary counterpoint, accumulating a body count along the way. There are multiple mysteries involved: Will Jane be able to claim her inheritance? What’s going on in the cellar? Why does her employer always wear gloves? What happened to the missing jewels? Will Jane be exposed as a murderess? There’s a lot going on, but the storyline is never confusing or jumbled. All of those questions eventually get answered in a satisfying way, and the reader is left feeling justice has been served all the way around. Jane Steele may be the only time a reader is left rooting for a heroine who identifies herself as a serial killer.

Three words that describe this book: gothic, absorbing, different

You might want to pick this book up if: You enjoy a good gothic mystery or “Jane Eyre.”

-Katherine

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Everyone Deserves the Opportunity to Play

DBRL Next - June 15, 2016

Book cover for “Do you know what my favorite part of the game is? The opportunity to play.”– Mike Singletary, speaking of his career in football.

Isn’t this what we all want: the chance to participate in activities that enrich our lives? In the past, a physical or cognitive disability often meant spectator-only status when it came to sports, but that’s become less true with each passing decade. Check out Special Olympics champion gymnast, Chelsea Werner. Color me impressed; I never even learned to do a proper cartwheel.

Eunice Kennedy Shriver started Special Olympics in 1968, inspired by her sister, Rosemary Kennedy, who had cognitive disabilities and had been left out of many areas of life. For the past twenty years, Shriver’s son, Timothy, has served as chair of the organization. In his book “Fully Alive,” he speaks about the history of the group and his own personal experiences working with the athletes. Shriver finds motivation for his work in his faith, but there’s plenty of inspiration here for people of all belief systems.

Local athletes who are interested in participating in Special Olympics can contact Columbia Parks and Recreation or Special Olympics Missouri.

The 2005 documentary “Murderball” brought increased awareness to another group of athletes busy not sitting on the sidelines. The filmmakers followed the US quad (quadriplegia) Rugby team from training through competition in the 2004 Paralympics. The play is fast-paced and aggressive, and with specially designed wheelchairs, they manage to keep the contact aspect of the sport.

For a personal account of someone who refused to be stopped by his disability, check out John Maclean’s memoir “How Far Can You Go?” In 2013, Maclean realized his dream of walking again, 25 years after an accident that left him partially paralyzed. In the meantime, he competed as a wheelchair athlete in the Iron Man Triathlon, swam the English Channel, raced yachts and won a silver medal for rowing in the Paralympics.

As these athletes have shown us, inclusion isn’t an act of charity; it’s basic fairness. We all benefit when everyone has the opportunity to play.

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The View From Here: One Read Art Exhibit Call for Submissions

One Read - June 14, 2016

Thompson Research Center, Photo by Kyle SpradleyThe View From Here
A One Read Art Exhibit
Orr Street Studios (106 Orr Street, Columbia)

“The sky is our sea here, our object of contemplation in all its moods and shades. My father taught me to observe it…My father loved to watch, in autumn, the long scarves of lonely birds, flying, finally together, toward home.”
~ George Hodgman, “Bettyville”

 

“Missouri in the springtime is pretty hard to beat, little boy.”
~ Betty Hodgman

 
Inspired by this year’s One Read selection, we invite mid-Missouri artists to contribute works that explore the Midwestern landscape, rural communities, family houses or other scenes from this place we call home.

Cash prizes will be awarded for three winners, courtesy of Columbia’s Office of Cultural Affairs. The third place winner will receive $50, the second place winner $75 and the first place winner $125. The first place winner will also receive a $100 voucher towards a class at the Columbia Art League. Art will be displayed August 28 through September 24 at Orr Street Studios with a reception, awards and program on Tuesday, September 13, 6:30 – 8:00 p.m.

Submission Details

  • Artists must be at least 16 years of age.
  • Artists may submit one work in any visual medium.
  • Pieces should be ready for display; pieces without secure hanging wire cannot be accepted (no sawtooth hangers, please).
  • Work should be labeled on the back with your name, phone number or email and title of the work.
  • Submit artwork to Orr Street Studios (106 Orr Street, Columbia).
  • Submission forms will be available at Orr Street on the dates below, or you may print and fill one out to bring in with your work.
  • Submission dates are:
    • Thursday, August 25, 12-3 p.m
    • Friday, August 26, 12-3 p.m.
    • Saturday, August 27, 10 a.m.-12 p.m.
  • At the end of the exhibit, artists can pick up their work Saturday, Sept 24, 12-3 p.m. and Sunday, September 25, 12-3 p.m.

Questions? Contact Lauren Williams at 573-443-3161 or by E-mail.

Special thanks to Orr Street Studios, the Columbia Art League and Columbia’s Office of Cultural Affairs  for their support!

Orr Street Studios LogoColumbia Art League LogoOCA Logo

 

 

 

 

 

photo credit: Thompson Research Center, photo by Photo by Kyle Spradley, copyright MU College of Agriculture, Food & Natural Resources via photopin (license)

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First 2016 Summer Reading Gift Card Winner Announced

DBRL Next - June 14, 2016

TrophyCongratulations to Emily D., a Columbia Public Library patron, for winning our first Adult Summer Reading prize drawing.  She is the recipient of a $25 Barnes & Noble gift card.

All it takes to be entered into our weekly drawings is to sign up for Adult Summer Reading. You can do this at any of our branch locations or Bookmobile stops or register online. Also, don’t forget that submitting book reviews increases your chances of winning. There are plenty of chances left to win this summer, so keep those reviews coming.

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Memoirs for Life’s Challenges and Changes

DBRL Next - June 13, 2016

Book cover for A Homemade Life by Molly WizenbergI find that the first step in a new challenge for me is often to understand how someone else did it. When I wanted to start running (on purpose!), I didn’t consult a training plan. Instead, I read Haruki Murakami’s  “What I Talk About When I Talk About Running” for inspiration. Similarly, when I wanted to cook at home more often, I didn’t check out a cookbook. I read “A Homemade Life: Stories and Recipes From My Kitchen Table” by Molly Wizenberg. Sometimes the inspiration works the other way – I read “Animal, Vegetable, Miracle: A Year of Food Life” by Barbara Kingsolver because it was a One Read finalist in 2008. It motivated me to eat locally-produced healthful food more often.

Book cover for Wave by Sonali DeraniyagalaOther times, memoirs help me understand an experience that I hope to never have. Sonali Deraniyagala’s “Wave” recounts the deaths of her parents, husband and children in Sri Lanka during the 2004 tsunami. It is unfathomable to me (and probably to most people) how one could survive such loss, and I have recalled Deraniyagala’s strength many times since I read her memoir. Jean-Dominique Bauby fell into a coma following a stroke, and when he awoke, he found that he suffered from locked-in syndrome. He composed “The Diving Bell and the Butterfly: A Memoir of Life in Death” by blinking his left eyelid – the only body part he could move.

Book cover for The Year of Living BiblicallyNot all memoirs are about such serious topics. A.J. Jacobs has made a career out of undergoing challenges and then writing humorously about such challenges. Jacobs has followed the proscriptions and tenets of the Bible (“The Year of Living Biblically: One Man’s Humble Quest to Follow the Bible as Literally as Possible”), implemented rigorous health routines (“Drop Dead Healthy: One Man’s Humble Quest for Bodily Perfection”), volunteered as a subject of science (“The Guinea Pig Diaries: My Life as An Experiment”) and attempted to improve his intellect (“The Know-it-all: One Man’s Humble Quest to Become the Smartest Person in the World”).

There are plenty of memoirs to help you meet your life challenges – whether self-imposed or circumstantial – at your library. These are just a few.

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Three Ways to Celebrate Audiobook Month

DBRL Next - June 10, 2016

June is audiobook month, as well as the unofficial start of summer travel season. Spice up that long road trip with some good storytelling with a little help from your library!

1. Check out a 2016 Audie Award winner!

Audiobook cover for The Girl on the TrainNamed audiobook of the year, “The Girl on the Train” by Paula Hawkins (narrated by Clare Corbett) was last year’s “Gone Girl.” In this psychological thriller, a woman becomes emotionally entangled in a murder investigation because of something she witnesses on her daily commute. Or try the fiction winner, “The Nightingale” by Kristin Hannah (audiobook narrated by Polly Stone), which follows French sisters Viann and Isabelle as they resist German occupiers during WWII, each in her own way. If nonfiction is more your speed, pick up the winner in history/biography, “A Man on the Moon: The Voyages of the Apollo Astronauts” by Andrew Chaikin (narrated by Bronson Pinchot).

2. Entertain kids with audiobooks in the car.

Audiobook cover for Circus MirandusIf you have little ones in the backseat, check out some family-friendly audiobooks. “Circus Mirandus” by Cassie Beasley is reminiscent of Peter Pan and follows Micah Tuttle who, when he realizes that his grandfather’s stories of an enchanted circus are true, sets out to find the mysterious circus — and to use its magic to save his grandfather’s life. In Chris Grabenstein’s puzzle-filled “Escape From Mr. Lemoncello’s Library,” 12-year-old Kyle gets to stay overnight in the new town library, designed by his hero, the famous gamemaker Luigi Lemoncello.

3. Suggest an audiobook selection for your book club. 

Hoopla is a service available from your library that allows you to stream and download audiobooks (as well as eBooks, comics, movies and television shows). Sign up for an account (this quick start guide shows you how), download the app and borrow up to 10 items per month. Everyone in your book club can borrow the same book on Hoopla – there’s no limit to how many people can borrow an item at once! Try Ben Fountain’s “Billy Lynn’s Long Haftime Walk,” Neil Gaiman’s “The Ocean at the End of the Lane” or “Daring Greatly” by Brené Brown.

Whether you are a long-time fan of audiobooks or new to listening to books, take advantage of your library’s large collection of downloadable audiobooks, books on CD and playaways. Give a book a listen this summer!

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Wii U Gaming Events

DBRLTeen - June 10, 2016

Wii U Gaming EventsWii U “Mario Cart” Grand Prix
Wednesday, June 22 from 3-4:30 p.m.
Columbia Public Library, Studio

Become a gold cup winner in “Mario Kart 8.” Snacks provided. Ages 10 and older. Parents welcome. Registration required. To sign up, please call (573) 443-3161.

Wii Dance-Off
Thursday, June 30 from 2-3:30 p.m.
Columbia Public Library, Studio

So you think you can dance? Put on your dancing shoes and get ready to cut a rug. We’ll dance our way from the original “Just Dance” game all the way through to “Just Dance 2016”! Snacks provided. Ages 10 and older. Parents welcome. Registration begins June 14. To sign up, please call (573) 443-3161.

Originally published at Wii U Gaming Events.

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Project Teen: Games and Crafts

DBRLTeen - June 8, 2016

Project Teen is a regular program hosted at each of our three library branches. We invite young adults ages 12-18 to join us for craft projects and pizza. In June, you can make your own game using cardboard and other recycled materials, or enjoy retro crafts like Shrinky Dinks, friendship bracelets and sun catchers!

Project Teen: Create a GameYummy Pizza
Friday, June 17 from Noon-1:30 p.m.
Callaway County Public Library
Ages 12-18. No registration required.

Project Teen: Retro Crafts
Monday, June 20 from 1-2:30 p.m.
Columbia Public Library, Studio
Ages 12-18. Registration begins June 7. To sign up, please call (573) 443-3161.

Project Teen: Create a Game
Tuesday, June 28 from 2-3 p.m.
Southern Boone County Public Library
Ages 12 and older. No registration required.

Originally published at Project Teen: Games and Crafts.

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Teen Photo Contest Launches!

DBRLTeen - June 7, 2016

Teen-Photogapher 180 pxUse your camera to capture life in motion. Submit a photo in one of three categories by July 31 for a chance to win a Barnes & Noble gift card. This contest is open to anyone aged 12-18 in Boone and Callaway Counties. Find contest rules and submission guidelines online, or at your library.

Photo credit: Camera by Martinak15 via Flickr. Used under creative commons license.

Originally published at Teen Photo Contest Launches!.

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2016-17 Gateway Award Finalists

DBRLTeen - June 3, 2016

2017 Gateway Award Banner

The Gateway Readers Award honors a young adult novel that is selected by Missouri high school students. To be eligible to vote, students must read at least three of the finalists. Voting will occur at participating schools early next March, so you can use the summer months to get crack-a-lackin’ on this list! The winner will be announced in April 2017.

Red Rising” by Pierce Brown
Darrow is a Red, a member of the lowest caste in the color-coded society of the future. Inspired by a longing for justice, and driven by the memory of lost love, Darrow sacrifices everything to infiltrate the legendary Insti-tute, a proving ground for the dominant Gold caste. He will be forced to compete for his life and the very future of civilization against the best and most brutal of Society’s ruling class.

We Were Liars” by E. Lockhart
Spending the summers on her family’s private island off the coast of Massachusetts with her cousins and a special boy named Gat, teen-aged Cadence struggles to remember what happened during her fifteenth summer.

Love and Other Foreign Words” by Erin McCahan
Brilliant fifteen-year-old Josie has a knack for languages, but her sister’s engagement has Josie grappling with the nature of true love, her feelings for her best friend Stu, and how anyone can be truly herself, or truly in love, in a social language that is not her own.

Don’t Look Back” by Jennifer L. Armentrout
Seventeen-year-old Sam seems to have every-thing until she and her best friend, Cassie, disappear one night. Now Sam has returned with amnesia, striving to be a much better person and aware that her not remembering may be the only thing keeping Cassie alive.

The Book of Ivy” by Amy Engel
In an apocalyptic future where girls from the losing faction are forcibly married to boys of the winning faction, sixteen-year-old Ivy is tasked to kill her fiancé Bishop, although when she finally meets him, he is not the monster she has been led to believe.

The Winner’s Curse” by Marie Rutkoski
An aristocratic girl who is a member of a war-mongering and enslaving empire purchases a slave, an act that sets in motion a rebellion that might overthrow her world as well as her heart.

The Young Elites” by Marie Lu
Adelina Amouteru survived the blood fever, a deadly illness that killed many, but left others with strange markings and supernatural powers. Cast out by her family, Adelina joins the secret society of the Young Elites and discovers her own dangerous abilities.

Made for You” by Melissa Marr
Southern small town darling Eva Tilling wakes up in the hospital with the frightening ability to see through the eyes of the victims of a serial killer, and realizes that she, too, is a target of the depraved stalker.

Free to Fall” by Lauren Miller
In a near-future world where everyone is controlled by their smartphones, sixteen-year-old Rory Vaughn suddenly begins listening to the voice within–which kids are taught to ignore– and discovers a terrible plot at the heart of the corporation that makes the devices.

The Kiss of Deception” by Mary E. Pearson
Princess Lia is expected to have the revered gift of sight, but she does not. She knows her parents are perpetrating a sham when they arrange her marriage to a prince she has never met in order to secure an alliance with a neighboring kingdom. Lia flees to a distant village and settles into a new life. Deceptions swirl and Lia finds herself on the brink of unlocking perilous secrets, even as she finds herself falling in love.

Nil” by Lynne Matson
Transported through a “gate” to the mysterious island of Nil, seventeen-year-old Charley has 365 days to escape–or she will die.

Torn Away” by Jennifer Brown
In the aftermath of a tornado that has devastated her hometown of Elizabeth, Missouri, sixteen-year-old Jersey Cameron struggles to overcome her grief as she is sent to live with her only surviving relatives.

Call Me By My Name” by John Ed Bradley
Growing up in Louisiana in the late 1960s, where segregation and prejudice still thrive, two high school football players, one white, one black, become friends, but some changes are too difficult to accept.

Since You’ve Been Gone” by Morgan Matson
Quiet Emily’s sociable and daring best friend, Sloane, has disappeared leaving nothing but a random list of bizarre tasks for her to complete, but with unexpected help from popular classmate Frank Porter, Emily gives them a try.

Some Boys” by Patty Blount
Shunned by her friends and even her father after she accuses the town golden boy of rape, Grace wonders if she can ever trust Ian, a classmate who is funny, kind, and has secrets of his own.

Originally published at 2016-17 Gateway Award Finalists.

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2016 Teen Summer Reading Challenge

DBRLTeen - June 1, 2016

TSRP 2016 300 pxRegistration for DBRL’s Teen Summer Reading Challenge has begun! Sign up online, or at any of our three library branches or bookmobile stops.

To participate, you must read for 20 hours, share three book reviews and do seven of our suggested activities. Beginning July 5, when you finish, you’ll receive a free book and be entered into a drawing for some other fun rewards including a Kindle Fire!

This program is open to young adults ages 12-18 in Boone and Callaway counties. Summer Reading continues through August 13. 

This year’s Summer Reading theme is “On Your Mark, Get Set, Read!” We will be promoting books and offering programs that focus on wellness, fitness, sports and games of all sorts.

Put on your dancing shoes and join us for a Wii U “Just Dance” dance-off.  Do you love tabletop games? Mark your calendars now for our Mega Gamer Eve in July. Later this summer, enjoy a relaxing yoga practice followed by a yummy smoothie. To receive email reminders of these and other teen events, sign up for our monthly newsletter!

Originally published at 2016 Teen Summer Reading Challenge.

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