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Best Audiobooks for Your Road Trip: 2014 Audie Winners

DBRL Next - June 6, 2014

Cover art for Still Foolin' Em by Billy CrystalJust in time for your summer travels, the Audio Publishers Association (APA) has announced this year’s awards recognizing distinction in audiobooks and spoken word entertainment. Nothing makes the miles fly by like listening to a professional read an engrossing story, so check out one of these titles on CD or downloadable audio before you hit the road.

Audiobook of the Year: “Still Foolin’ ‘Em” by Billy Crystal; Read by Billy Crystal
The judges praised this work calling it “a seamless blend of single voice narration and live performances that does for the audiobook medium what Billy Crystal’s opening acts have done for the Oscars, which is to bring in a larger audience. From Mickey Mantle to Muhammad Ali, with the inside story on Meg Ryan’s infamous scene in ‘When Harry Met Sally’ thrown in for good measure, Crystal’s life story will have listeners hanging on every word.”

Distinguished Achievement in Production: “Pete Seeger: The Storm King” by Pete Seeger, edited by Jeff Haynes (read by Pete Seeger)
Publisher’s description: “The Storm king audio collection presents Pete Seeger’s spoken words as he recounts his most engaging stories, narratives and poems, set to new music created by over 70 musicians from traditions as diverse as African Music, Blues, Bluegrass, Celtic Music, Classical Guitar, Folk, Israeli Music, Jazz, Native American Music and Tuvan Throat Singing.”

Nonfiction: “David and Goliath” by Malcolm Gladwell (read by Malcolm Gladwell)
Publisher’s description: “Malcolm Gladwell, with his unparalleled ability to grasp connections others miss, uncovers the hidden rules that shape the balance between the weak and the mighty, the powerful and the dispossessed.” 

History: “Devil in the Grove” by Gilbert King (read by Peter Francis James)
Publisher’s description: “Chronicles a little-known court case in which Thurgood Marshall successfully saved a black citrus worker from the electric chair after the worker was accused of raping a white woman with three other black men.”

Fiction: “Doctor Sleep” by Stephen King (read by Will Patton)
Publisher’s description: “Stephen King returns to the characters and territory of one of his most popular novels ever, ‘The Shining,’ in this instantly riveting novel about the now middle-aged Dan Torrance (the boy protagonist of ‘The Shining’) and the very special 12-year-old girl he must save from a tribe of murderous paranormals.” 

Literary Fiction: “The Goldfinch” by Donna Tartt (read by David Pittu)
Publisher’s description: “A young boy in New York City, Theo Decker, miraculously survives an accident that takes the life of his mother. Alone and abandoned by his father, Theo is taken in by a friend’s family and struggles to make sense of his new life. In the years that follow, he becomes entranced by one of the few things that reminds him of his mother – a small, mysteriously captivating painting that ultimately draws Theo into the art underworld.”

See the full list of Audie winners at APA’s website.

The post Best Audiobooks for Your Road Trip: 2014 Audie Winners appeared first on DBRL Next.

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One Read Art Exhibit: Call for Submissions

One Read - June 6, 2014

Photo by Nicolas Massé via Flickr, used under a Creative Commons LicenseOn the Water
A One Read Art Exhibit
Orr Street Studios (106 Orr Street, Columbia)

“It’s a great art, is rowing. It’s the finest art there is.” ~ George Pocock, as quoted by Daniel James Brown in “The Boys in the Boat”

 

Inspired by this year’s One Read selection, we invite Mid-Missouri artists to contribute works that explore a range of experiences and views of water, whether from shore or flying across the water itself, “in a poem of motion, a symphony of swinging blades.”

Cash prizes will be awarded for three winners, courtesy of Columbia’s Office of Cultural Affairs. The third place winner will receive $50, the second place winner $75 and the first place winner $125. The first place winner will also receive a $100 gift certificate from the Columbia Art League Art, good for use towards any class. Art will be displayed September 7-20 at Orr Street Studios with an opening reception, awards and program on Tuesday, September 9 at 6 p.m.

Submission Details

  • Artists must be at least 16 years of age.
  • Artists may submit one work in any visual medium.
  • Pieces should be ready for display; pieces without secure hanging wire cannot be accepted (no sawtooth hangers, please).
  • Work should be labeled on the back with your name, phone number or email, title of the work and medium used.
  • Submit artwork to Orr Street Studios (106 Orr Street, Columbia).
  • Submission dates are:
    • Friday, September 5, Noon-5 p.m.
    • Saturday, September 6, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.
  • After the exhibit, artists can pick up their artwork Saturday, September 20 between noon and 5 p.m. or Sunday, September 21 between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m.

Questions? Contact Lauren Williams at 573-443-3161 or by E-mail.

Special thanks to Orr Street Studios, the Columbia Art League and Columbia’s Office of Cultural Affairs  for their support!

Orr Street Studios LogoColumbia Art League LogoOCA Logo

 

photo credit: Nicoze via photopin cc

The post One Read Art Exhibit: Call for Submissions appeared first on One READ.

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Books for Dudes – “Mr. Penumbra’s 24-Hour Bookstore”

DBRLTeen - June 5, 2014

What kind of book starts with a mysterious antiquated bookstore before transforming into Google employees creating code-cracking algorithms to uncover the secret of immortality? Welcome to “Mr. Penumbra’s 24-Hour Bookstore,” by Robin Sloan.

indexClay Jannon went from life as a web designer to unemployed during a recession. Searching for any job, he finds himself working the late shift of Mr. Penumbra’s 24-Hour Bookstore. But after only a few days working under the harmless Mr. Penumbra, Clay starts noticing how odd the store really is. The customers are few, appear seemingly eccentric, and only check out old tomes from dusty shelves towering far above the store’s floor. Clay’s curiosity leads him to form a team of helpers, including his Google-centric girlfriend and nerd-turned-success best friend in cracking the mysteries of his employer, and what he finds creates twists and turns in the plot that no one can see coming. I would love to live in this bookstore, and I invite you to come visit.

This book was a 2013 Alex Award Winner. For those unfamiliar with the award, the Alex Awards are given each year to ten books written for adults that have special appeal to young adults, ages 12 through 18. This particular book might be a little mature for 12 or 13 year olds, but I’m comfortable recommending it to anyone of high school age. And for those of you intrigued by the Alex Awards, descriptions of the 2014 winners can be found here.

Next month, in celebration of this year’s current summer reading theme of science, we’ll be focusing on the science of superheroes with several graphic novel reviews.

Originally published at Books for Dudes – “Mr. Penumbra’s 24-Hour Bookstore”.

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New DVD: “Glickman”

Center Aisle Cinema - June 4, 2014

glickman

We recently added “Glickman” to the DBRL collection. The film was shown last year on HBO and currently has a rating of 80% from critics at Rotten Tomatoes. Here’s a synopsis from our catalog:

Before Marv Albert, Bob Costas, and Mike Breen, there was Marty Glickman. The documentary chronicles the life and career of Glickman, a Jewish-American athlete turned broadcaster who pioneered many of the techniques, phrases, and programming innovations that are commonplace in sports reporting today. A multi-sport athlete with blistering speed, he was a teammate of Jesse Owens on the 1936 U.S. Olympic track team.

Check out the film trailer or the official film site for more info.

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Art in the Park: Inspiration to Make Marks

DBRL Next - June 4, 2014

Poster for 2014 Art in the Park festivalI grew up in Columbia, and one of the things I have fond memories of doing each year is going to Art in the Park with my mom. It became a little tradition of ours. We’d eat kettle corn and walk through the booths, ohing and ahing over each artist’s work.

I’m glad to be back in Columbia this year and able to resume the tradition. Columbia Art League’s 2014 Art in the Park will be held at Stephens Lake Park on Saturday the 7th and Sunday the 8th.  For information about everything from the artists to parking, visit the festival’s website.

As an artist, I always find myself inspired to create after visiting the festival. In preparation, I browsed the library’s collection of art books. DBRL has every kind of how-to book you can imagine. We’ve got books on woodwork, ceramics, painting, quilting, knitting, drawing and jewelry making. It’s a great collection and definitely one to look at if you’re in the mood to make something beautiful.

Here are some of my favorites within the collection.

Freehand” by Helen Birch

This book has a picture on every page and quick how-tos on techniques. Easy to read and fun to look at!

Paper to Petal” by Rebbeca Thuss

Book cover for Paper to Petal

Everything in this book is beautiful. The flowers are imaginative, colorful and realistic. They would look good in anyone’s house.

Animal Hats” by Venessa Mooncie

Book cover for Animal Hats

One word: Fun. These hats are crazy cool, and you won’t just find the generic cat hat here. There is a cow hat and an elephant hat, just to give you an idea of how creative these toppers get.

Simon Leach’s Pottery Handbook” by Simon Leach

Book cover for Simon Leach's Pottery Handbook

As a potter, I thought this book provided good information on throwing techniques and ways to apply them. It also comes with a DVD.

Silversmithing for Jewelry Makers” by Elizabeth Bone

Book cover for Silversmithing for Jewelry Makers

I am not a jeweler, and the techniques demonstrated in this book look difficult, but the final products are gorgeous.

Have fun, and go enjoy Art in the Park this weekend on Saturday the 7th and Sunday the 8th. Maybe I’ll see you there.

The post Art in the Park: Inspiration to Make Marks appeared first on DBRL Next.

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Judging a Book by Its Cover: Science Coffee Table Books

Next Book Buzz - June 2, 2014

Book cover for The Elements by Theodore GrayI generally follow the advice to never judge a book by its cover, but sometimes the cover is what attracts me to a book. When I was a child, I read the book “National Geographic Picture Atlas of Our Universe,“ by Roy A. Gallant, because there was a cool-looking spaceship on the cover. The book was about astronomy and physics, of course, but it also had mythological stories about each planet and about the universe as a whole. There were illustrations and charts that helped my puny mind begin to grasp the complex ideas of space and time. But what I most clearly remember about the book was the section in which the author imagined what characteristics life would have to survive the heat of Venus of the atmosphere of Jupiter.

My attraction to coffee table books continues through the present day. They are convenient to browse when you are waiting 15 minutes for the oven timer to sound but are equally suited to intensive investigation on the back porch with a cup of coffee. Here are some of my more recent favorites.

The Elements: A Visual Exploration of Every Known Atom in the Universe
by Theodore Gray
The author describes this book as containing “Everything you need to know. Nothing you don’t.” Gray lays out the requisite structural information for each element, but he also shows you what each element looks like. He also shares examples of how each element is used, both in nature and by humans. Learning about atomic weights and density might not seem immediately thrilling, but this book is fun enough to have inspired puzzles and posters.

Book cover for The Oldest Living Things in the World by Rachel SussmanThe Oldest Living Things in the World
by Rachel Sussman
This book is the culmination of 10 years of Sussman’s work. She traveled to every continent and even learned to scuba dive so she could photograph organisms that are all at least 2,000 years old. The pictures are exceptional, of course, but what distinguishes this book are the stories that Sussman shares about her process.

 The Definitive Visual GuideScience: The Definitive Visual Guide
edited by Adam Hart-Davis
If you can’t decide which scientific discipline you want to learn about, then this book is the place to start. It is organized chronologically and covers biology, medicine, astronomy, math, chemistry, life, the universe and everything. Parents (or anybody who likes awesome juvenile books) might recognize DK Publishing as the publisher of the Eyewitness book series. This science book has a similarly pleasing aesthetic, breaking down complicated ideas into simpler and manageable elements.

The post Judging a Book by Its Cover: Science Coffee Table Books appeared first on DBRL Next.

Categories: Book Buzz

Judging a Book by Its Cover: Science Coffee Table Books

DBRL Next - June 2, 2014

Book cover for The Elements by Theodore GrayI generally follow the advice to never judge a book by its cover, but sometimes the cover is what attracts me to a book. When I was a child, I read the book “National Geographic Picture Atlas of Our Universe,“ by Roy A. Gallant, because there was a cool-looking spaceship on the cover. The book was about astronomy and physics, of course, but it also had mythological stories about each planet and about the universe as a whole. There were illustrations and charts that helped my puny mind begin to grasp the complex ideas of space and time. But what I most clearly remember about the book was the section in which the author imagined what characteristics life would have to survive the heat of Venus of the atmosphere of Jupiter.

My attraction to coffee table books continues through the present day. They are convenient to browse when you are waiting 15 minutes for the oven timer to sound but are equally suited to intensive investigation on the back porch with a cup of coffee. Here are some of my more recent favorites.

The Elements: A Visual Exploration of Every Known Atom in the Universe
by Theodore Gray
The author describes this book as containing “Everything you need to know. Nothing you don’t.” Gray lays out the requisite structural information for each element, but he also shows you what each element looks like. He also shares examples of how each element is used, both in nature and by humans. Learning about atomic weights and density might not seem immediately thrilling, but this book is fun enough to have inspired puzzles and posters.

Book cover for The Oldest Living Things in the World by Rachel SussmanThe Oldest Living Things in the World
by Rachel Sussman
This book is the culmination of 10 years of Sussman’s work. She traveled to every continent and even learned to scuba dive so she could photograph organisms that are all at least 2,000 years old. The pictures are exceptional, of course, but what distinguishes this book are the stories that Sussman shares about her process.

 The Definitive Visual GuideScience: The Definitive Visual Guide
edited by Adam Hart-Davis
If you can’t decide which scientific discipline you want to learn about, then this book is the place to start. It is organized chronologically and covers biology, medicine, astronomy, math, chemistry, life, the universe and everything. Parents (or anybody who likes awesome juvenile books) might recognize DK Publishing as the publisher of the Eyewitness book series. This science book has a similarly pleasing aesthetic, breaking down complicated ideas into simpler and manageable elements.

The post Judging a Book by Its Cover: Science Coffee Table Books appeared first on DBRL Next.

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2014 Teen Summer Reading Challenge

DBRLTeen - June 2, 2014
GearsRegistration for the Teen Summer Reading Challenge has begun!

The library is challenging area young adults ages 12-18 to read for 20 hours, share three book reviews and do seven of our suggested activities. Get your reward card punched as you go, and when you finish, you’ll receive a free book and be entered in a drawing for a Kindle e-reader. Sign up online, or at any of our three library branches or bookmobile stops.

Originally published at 2014 Teen Summer Reading Challenge.

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Summer Program Preview: Technology and Science

DBRL Next - May 30, 2014

Summer of Science logoSummer Reading launches Monday, and this year’s programs celebrate science of all sorts. Here are just some of the programs coming up next week and beyond. Learn something new this summer!

Drop-in Windows 8 Help
Monday, June 2 › 3-4 p.m.
Columbia Public Library, Training Center
Did you just buy a new Windows 8 computer and have no idea where to start? Come to our informal session to learn about the Windows 8 operating system and get pointers on how to use it.

Selling Online
Monday, June 2 › 6:30-8:30 p.m.
Columbia Public Library, Training Center
In this intro class, learn the basics of selling your stuff on three popular websites–eBay, an auction site; Craigslist, a classified ad site; and Etsy, a marketplace for handmade and vintage items. Basic computer skills required. Register by calling 573-443-3161.

Discover Nature—Fishing in Missouri
Thursday, June 5, 2014 › 6:30-8 p.m.
Callaway County Public Library, Friends Room
Mariah Morrison with the Missouri Department of Conservation will talk about fishing in Missouri and teach you to identify the most common fish in our state’s waters. She’ll also share tips on bait, lures and tying knots. Adults. Register by calling 573-642-7261

Google Toolbox
Friday, June 13, 2014 › 2:30-4 p.m.
Columbia Public Library, Training Center
Learn to use Google to create a website or blog; keep a calendar; organize and share your pictures and videos; work with web-based documents, spreadsheets and presentations; do scholarly research; and more. Register by calling 573-443-3161.

The Art and Science of Archaeology
Saturday, June 14, 2014 › 2-3 p.m.
Columbia Public Library, Friends Room
As they study earlier human cultures, archaeologists draw from a wide range of sciences including chemistry, geology, biology, astronomy, botany and paleontology. We’ll take a look at some of these scientific methods and tools and how they help construct a more accurate view of history. Museum educator Rachel Straughn-Navarro will show some examples of ancient artifacts and talk about the ways the museum helps in the preservation and exploration of the past. Co-sponsored by the Museum of Art and Archaeology, University of Missouri.

Free Websites for Genealogists
Monday, June 16, 2014 › 6:30-8 p.m.
Callaway County Public Library, Friends Room, or 
Tuesday, June 17, 2014 › 7-9 p.m.
Southern Boone County Public Library, Meeting Room
Genealogist Tim Dollens will introduce several free sites you can use to track down your family’s history.

See all our Adult Summer Reading programs online!

The post Summer Program Preview: Technology and Science appeared first on DBRL Next.

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Teen Winners in Callaway County Poetry Contest

DBRLTeen - May 29, 2014
2014 Poetry Contest Winners

2014 Poetry Contest Winners & Judges

Thanks to all the young poets who submitted entries in the 2014 Callaway County Youth Poetry Contest, sponsored by the Callaway County Public Library and the Auxvasse Creative Arts Program. These organizations honored the winners of the contest on Thursday, May 1 at the Callaway County Public Library in Fulton. This year’s contest was judged by Clarence Wolfshohl and Denise Felt. Dallin Rickabaugh, Garett Ballard and Anna Casady  were among those teens recognized for their exemplary work.

Pictured on the front row: Elise Klein, Lia Bondurant, Anna Klein, Corrie Bolton, Anna Casady.

Pictured on the back row: Clarence Wolfshohl (judge), Garett Ballard, Haley Garrett, Dallin Rickabaugh, Denise Felt (judge).

“Synesthesia” by Dallin Rickabaugh (1st Place)

Imagine a world
where music is seen.
Replace the crow of the alarm clock
with the blood red beat of a drum
coursing through your veins.
You get dressed for the day,
and waves of violet jazz surround you,
lifting your spirits
and twirling you about.
The olive green rock’n roll
that shaped your mom and dad
in those gold and silver days
drives you down the highway
towards your bland, white cubicle.
Work diligently
to the black and blue
bass and drum
that fuel those droning hours.
Come home and relax
To the white snowfall
Of light piano,
And the bright sunshine of acoustic guitar.
Fall asleep
to the soft
red clouds
of violas,
as they
Lull
You
a-bye
To
Sleep,
Only to
Wake up again
The next morning,
Hearing the loud sun
Through your window pane.
This world turns
With a smooth,
Purple swoosh,
So silent and silver
But only the celestials
Can hear it.
But we see
That music
Every day,
In the love of our family,
In the smiles of our friends,
In the beating of our hearts.

“Imagine a World” by Garett Ballard (2nd Place)

I imagine a world with freedom and flare
A place to be you, if you dare
I imagine a world with music and art
A place with creativity, right from the start
I imagine a world with thousands of smiles
A place like no other for miles and miles,
I imagine a world with beauty and care,
A place where everyone is eager to share.
I imagine a world where you never run late,
A place where you remember every date
I imagine a world with plenty of fun
A place where everyone is united as one.
I imagine a world with no cold or disease
A place with words like thank you and please
I imagine a world where all are polite
A place with peace, not a single fight
I imagine a world that will never be tame
A place where you be yourself, no need to have fame
I imaging a world with people to lead
A place with everything, all that you need
I imagine a world with color and shine
Clearly a world that was meant to be mine.

“Someday” by Anna Casady (3rd Place)

I imagine a world where someday I’ll be,
a world that is new and waiting for me.
A world with no hardships, no sickness no deaths,
a mansion of glory for souls to find rest.
Someday I’ll see the people I loved,
who have passed onto glory and the riches above.
Someday, I’ll see Christ, who died just for me,
and purchased my pardon on Calvary’s tree.
When my time comes to see my Lord’s face,
I’ll kneel down and thank him for His wonderful grace.
Life will be sweet and my joys complete,
when someday my Saviors face I will see.
You can live in this world where I’ll be,
if you let go of pride and choose to believe.

Originally published at Teen Winners in Callaway County Poetry Contest.

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KFRU’s David Lile Interviews One Read Author Daniel Brown

One Read - May 28, 2014

On May 27, KFRU’s David Lile interviewed this year’s One Read author Daniel Brown about his book, “The Boys in the Boat: Nine Americans and Their Epic Quest for Gold at the 1936 Berlin Olympics.” Listen to Brown speak about the book’s origins and response to being chosen for our community-wide reading program.

The post KFRU’s David Lile Interviews One Read Author Daniel Brown appeared first on One READ.

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New DVD: “The Green Wave”

Center Aisle Cinema - May 28, 2014

greenwave

We recently added “The Green Wave” to the DBRL collection. The film currently has a rating of 91% from critics at Rotten Tomatoes. Here’s a synopsis from our catalog:

Green is the color of hope. Green was the color of Islam and the symbol of respect among the supporters of presidential runner Mir-Hossein Mousavi, who became the figure of the Green Revolution. The election in 2009 was about change, but contrary to all expectations, Mahmoud Ahmadinejad was set in office. A collage illustrating the events and the stance of the people behind the rebellion: their initial hope and curiosity, fear, and the courage to continue to fight.

Check out the film trailer or the official film site for more info.

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Books for Cooks: “Jerusalem” and “Share”

DBRL Next - May 28, 2014

I’ve finally reached that age where I need to learn how to cook. I no longer have the excuse of college to explain my diet of pizza and coffee, and while microwaveable dinners are oh, so delicious, I think it’s time I educated myself on the world of cooking.

The library has a section of cookbooks so ginormous that it’s almost overwhelming. Perusing it is like trying to pick only one candy from a candy store to taste - nearly impossible. I started my selection inspired by a book I’d seen around my parent’s kitchen, thinking, “Yeah, I’ll start by cooking something I’ve already tasted.”

Book cover for JerusalemThis led me to the cookbook “Jerusalem” by Yotam Ottolenghi and Sami Tamimi. It’s hard not to love a cookbook full of delicious looking pictures and dishes rich with history. I found myself overwhelmed with the choices. I often had to judge if I had the required patience to cook the more complex recipes within “Jerusalem.” I’m newer to this cooking thing, so I thought, keep it simple. I tried the baby spinach salad with dates and almonds. I did cut corners with the pitas, using old bread instead, but it was still delicious.

Picture of clementine syrup cakeThere is one recipe in this book I will dance around and scream at you to try, and that’s the clementine and almond syrup cake. I am currently dieting, but of course, I sit, drooling, staring at this recipe and thinking back to the time I ate it at my parents’ house. It was an explosion of yummy goodness. It’s sweet but not too sweet, sticky with a citrus syrup and so good you could gobble up the whole thing. I love lemon and orange cakes, and this was a perfect mix of sweet, smooth and sticky.

Share: The Cookbook That Celebrates Our Common Humanity” wasn’t a cookbook I’d seen before, but I couldn’t pass it by. It was full of pictures, and the recipes felt full of heart. They come from hard-working and loving women across the world. The cooking isn’t as fancy as the stuff in Jerusalem, but it’s just as delicious. I was, of course, drawn to its sweet and drool-worthy desserts – all of which I shouldn’t eat but can’t help fantasizing about.

Book Cover for ShareThe dish I want to try the most is Manal Alsharif’s Basbosa. This is definitely a recipe I am saving for that time in my dieting when I can’t take it anymore and need a sweet. Basbosa is a dessert that looks similar to Jerusalem’s clementine and almond syrup cake, which is probably a large reason why I want to eat it. The base cake is made with cornstarch and coconut, cooked till golden, drizzled with syrup made of sugar and lemon juice and finally sprinkled with almonds and pistachio nuts. Yum.

Check out the cookbook section (starting at call number 641.5) and whip yourself up a dish one of these nice summer evenings.

The post Books for Cooks: “Jerusalem” and “Share” appeared first on DBRL Next.

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Top Ten Books Librarians Love: The June List

Next Book Buzz - May 27, 2014

Library Reads LogoLibrarians clearly have summer on their minds. The June edition of LibraryReads – the monthly list of forthcoming titles librarians across the country recommend – is full of books set near water – cities on the ocean, summer homes with pools, sandy beaches. From thrillers to family dramas, many of these books would make fantastic vacation reads.

Book cover for China Dolls by Lisa SeeChina Dolls
by Lisa See
“Set in 1938 San Francisco, this book follows the lives of three young women up through WWII. Grace travels to California seeking stardom, where she meets Helen, a young woman from Chinatown, and the two find jobs as nightclub dancers. While auditioning, they cross paths with Ruby, and the book alternates between all three viewpoints. Lisa See is one of my favorite authors, and her newest title doesn’t disappoint.”
- Catherine Coyne, Mansfield Public Library, Mansfield, MA

Book cover for The Ice Cream Queen of Orchard StreetThe Ice Cream Queen of Orchard Street
by Susan Jane Gilman
“In the tenements of old New York, a young Russian Jewish immigrant woman is taken in by an Italian family who sells ice. Through sheer persistence and strong will, she manages to build an ice cream empire. Lillian Dunkle is a complex character who will make you cheer even as you are dismayed. Have ice cream on hand when you read this book!”
- Marika Zemke, Commerce Township Public Library, Commerce Twp, MI

Book cover for I Am Having so Much Fun Here Without YouI Am Having So Much Fun Here Without You
by Courtney Maum
“Set mainly in Paris, this love story for grown-ups tells the story of a decent man who almost ruins his life and then goes to great lengths to restore his marriage. If your path to a happy marriage has been straightforward, you may not appreciate this book – but it’s perfect for the rest of us!”
- Laurel Best, Huntsville-Madison County Public Library, Huntsville, AL

Here is the rest of the list, with links to the library’s catalog so you can place holds on these on-order books!

The post Top Ten Books Librarians Love: The June List appeared first on DBRL Next.

Categories: Book Buzz

Top Ten Books Librarians Love: The June List

DBRL Next - May 27, 2014

Library Reads LogoLibrarians clearly have summer on their minds. The June edition of LibraryReads – the monthly list of forthcoming titles librarians across the country recommend – is full of books set near water – cities on the ocean, summer homes with pools, sandy beaches. From thrillers to family dramas, many of these books would make fantastic vacation reads.

Book cover for China Dolls by Lisa SeeChina Dolls
by Lisa See
“Set in 1938 San Francisco, this book follows the lives of three young women up through WWII. Grace travels to California seeking stardom, where she meets Helen, a young woman from Chinatown, and the two find jobs as nightclub dancers. While auditioning, they cross paths with Ruby, and the book alternates between all three viewpoints. Lisa See is one of my favorite authors, and her newest title doesn’t disappoint.”
- Catherine Coyne, Mansfield Public Library, Mansfield, MA

Book cover for The Ice Cream Queen of Orchard StreetThe Ice Cream Queen of Orchard Street
by Susan Jane Gilman
“In the tenements of old New York, a young Russian Jewish immigrant woman is taken in by an Italian family who sells ice. Through sheer persistence and strong will, she manages to build an ice cream empire. Lillian Dunkle is a complex character who will make you cheer even as you are dismayed. Have ice cream on hand when you read this book!”
- Marika Zemke, Commerce Township Public Library, Commerce Twp, MI

Book cover for I Am Having so Much Fun Here Without YouI Am Having So Much Fun Here Without You
by Courtney Maum
“Set mainly in Paris, this love story for grown-ups tells the story of a decent man who almost ruins his life and then goes to great lengths to restore his marriage. If your path to a happy marriage has been straightforward, you may not appreciate this book – but it’s perfect for the rest of us!”
- Laurel Best, Huntsville-Madison County Public Library, Huntsville, AL

Here is the rest of the list, with links to the library’s catalog so you can place holds on these on-order books!

The post Top Ten Books Librarians Love: The June List appeared first on DBRL Next.

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“Spark a Reaction” Bookmark Contest Winners

DBRLTeen - May 23, 2014

Earlier this spring we asked area young adults to help us prepare for Summer Reading by designing an original bookmark based on the teen theme, “Spark a Reaction.” Using ink, colored pencils and a great deal of imagination, this year’s teen winners artfully presented their interpretation of what this meant to them. Congratulations goes to Garett Ballard and Ruth Wu! You can pick up your own copies of these bookmarks at any of our three branch locations or bookmobile stops.

Originally published at “Spark a Reaction” Bookmark Contest Winners.

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Docs Around Town: May 23 – May 29

Center Aisle Cinema - May 22, 2014

unknownknown

May 23: The Unknown Known” starts at Ragtag. (via)

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“Particle Fever” on June 18th

Center Aisle Cinema - May 21, 2014

particlefever

Wednesday, June 18, 2014 • 6:30 p.m.
Columbia Public Library, Friends Room

A hit at the 2014 True/False Film Festival, the film “Particle Fever” (99 min.) explores a significant and inspiring scientific breakthrough as it happens. Imagine if you could have watched footage of Thomas Edison turn on the first light bulb. This film directed by Mark Levinson follows six brilliant scientists during the launch of the Large Hadron Collider, marking the start-up of the biggest and most expensive experiment in the history of the planet, pushing the edge of human innovation. 

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Questions from “The World Before Her”

Center Aisle Cinema - May 21, 2014

worldbeforeher

Thanks to everyone who came to the “The World Before Her” showing at the Columbia Public Library. Here are some questions about the film that you can respond to in the comments section of this blog post:

  1. What do you see in each young woman’s experience that gives her confidence? What experiences undermine that confidence?
  2. What’s the difference between modernization and Westernization? What might India look like if it modernized, but not in a way that emulated Western nations? Is that possible?
  3. In Prachi and Ruhi we see what pageant advocate Sabira Merchant describes as “the two Indias.” How would you describe the way each of those “Indias” defines success for women?
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