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The View From Here: One Read Art Exhibit Call for Submissions

One Read - June 14, 2016

Thompson Research Center, Photo by Kyle SpradleyThe View From Here
A One Read Art Exhibit
Orr Street Studios (106 Orr Street, Columbia)

“The sky is our sea here, our object of contemplation in all its moods and shades. My father taught me to observe it…My father loved to watch, in autumn, the long scarves of lonely birds, flying, finally together, toward home.”
~ George Hodgman, “Bettyville”

 

“Missouri in the springtime is pretty hard to beat, little boy.”
~ Betty Hodgman

 
Inspired by this year’s One Read selection, we invite mid-Missouri artists to contribute works that explore the Midwestern landscape, rural communities, family houses or other scenes from this place we call home.

Cash prizes will be awarded for three winners, courtesy of Columbia’s Office of Cultural Affairs. The third place winner will receive $50, the second place winner $75 and the first place winner $125. The first place winner will also receive a $100 voucher towards a class at the Columbia Art League. Art will be displayed August 28 through September 24 at Orr Street Studios with a reception, awards and program on Tuesday, September 13, 6:30 – 8:00 p.m.

Submission Details

  • Artists must be at least 16 years of age.
  • Artists may submit one work in any visual medium.
  • Pieces should be ready for display; pieces without secure hanging wire cannot be accepted (no sawtooth hangers, please).
  • Work should be labeled on the back with your name, phone number or email and title of the work.
  • Submit artwork to Orr Street Studios (106 Orr Street, Columbia).
  • Submission forms will be available at Orr Street on the dates below, or you may print and fill one out to bring in with your work.
  • Submission dates are:
    • Thursday, August 25, 12-3 p.m
    • Friday, August 26, 12-3 p.m.
    • Saturday, August 27, 10 a.m.-12 p.m.
  • At the end of the exhibit, artists can pick up their work Saturday, Sept 24, 12-3 p.m. and Sunday, September 25, 12-3 p.m.

Questions? Contact Lauren Williams at 573-443-3161 or by E-mail.

Special thanks to Orr Street Studios, the Columbia Art League and Columbia’s Office of Cultural Affairs  for their support!

Orr Street Studios LogoColumbia Art League LogoOCA Logo

 

 

 

 

 

photo credit: Thompson Research Center, photo by Photo by Kyle Spradley, copyright MU College of Agriculture, Food & Natural Resources via photopin (license)

The post The View From Here: One Read Art Exhibit Call for Submissions appeared first on One Read.

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First 2016 Summer Reading Gift Card Winner Announced

DBRL Next - June 14, 2016

TrophyCongratulations to Emily D., a Columbia Public Library patron, for winning our first Adult Summer Reading prize drawing.  She is the recipient of a $25 Barnes & Noble gift card.

All it takes to be entered into our weekly drawings is to sign up for Adult Summer Reading. You can do this at any of our branch locations or Bookmobile stops or register online. Also, don’t forget that submitting book reviews increases your chances of winning. There are plenty of chances left to win this summer, so keep those reviews coming.

The post First 2016 Summer Reading Gift Card Winner Announced appeared first on DBRL Next.

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Memoirs for Life’s Challenges and Changes

DBRL Next - June 13, 2016

Book cover for A Homemade Life by Molly WizenbergI find that the first step in a new challenge for me is often to understand how someone else did it. When I wanted to start running (on purpose!), I didn’t consult a training plan. Instead, I read Haruki Murakami’s  “What I Talk About When I Talk About Running” for inspiration. Similarly, when I wanted to cook at home more often, I didn’t check out a cookbook. I read “A Homemade Life: Stories and Recipes From My Kitchen Table” by Molly Wizenberg. Sometimes the inspiration works the other way – I read “Animal, Vegetable, Miracle: A Year of Food Life” by Barbara Kingsolver because it was a One Read finalist in 2008. It motivated me to eat locally-produced healthful food more often.

Book cover for Wave by Sonali DeraniyagalaOther times, memoirs help me understand an experience that I hope to never have. Sonali Deraniyagala’s “Wave” recounts the deaths of her parents, husband and children in Sri Lanka during the 2004 tsunami. It is unfathomable to me (and probably to most people) how one could survive such loss, and I have recalled Deraniyagala’s strength many times since I read her memoir. Jean-Dominique Bauby fell into a coma following a stroke, and when he awoke, he found that he suffered from locked-in syndrome. He composed “The Diving Bell and the Butterfly: A Memoir of Life in Death” by blinking his left eyelid – the only body part he could move.

Book cover for The Year of Living BiblicallyNot all memoirs are about such serious topics. A.J. Jacobs has made a career out of undergoing challenges and then writing humorously about such challenges. Jacobs has followed the proscriptions and tenets of the Bible (“The Year of Living Biblically: One Man’s Humble Quest to Follow the Bible as Literally as Possible”), implemented rigorous health routines (“Drop Dead Healthy: One Man’s Humble Quest for Bodily Perfection”), volunteered as a subject of science (“The Guinea Pig Diaries: My Life as An Experiment”) and attempted to improve his intellect (“The Know-it-all: One Man’s Humble Quest to Become the Smartest Person in the World”).

There are plenty of memoirs to help you meet your life challenges – whether self-imposed or circumstantial – at your library. These are just a few.

The post Memoirs for Life’s Challenges and Changes appeared first on DBRL Next.

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Memoirs for Life’s Challenges and Changes

Next Book Buzz - June 13, 2016

Book cover for A Homemade Life by Molly WizenbergI find that the first step in a new challenge for me is often to understand how someone else did it. When I wanted to start running (on purpose!), I didn’t consult a training plan. Instead, I read Haruki Murakami’s  “What I Talk About When I Talk About Running” for inspiration. Similarly, when I wanted to cook at home more often, I didn’t check out a cookbook. I read “A Homemade Life: Stories and Recipes From My Kitchen Table” by Molly Wizenberg. Sometimes the inspiration works the other way – I read “Animal, Vegetable, Miracle: A Year of Food Life” by Barbara Kingsolver because it was a One Read finalist in 2008. It motivated me to eat locally-produced, healthful food more often.

Book cover for Wave by Sonali DeraniyagalaOther times, memoirs help me understand an experience that I hope to never have. Sonali Deraniyagala’s “Wave” recounts the deaths of her parents, husband and children in Sri Lanka during the 2004 tsunami. It is unfathomable to me (and probably to most people) how one could survive such loss, and I have recalled Deraniyagala’s strength many times since I read her memoir. Jean-Dominique Bauby fell into a coma following a stroke, and when he awoke, he found that he suffered from locked-in syndrome. He composed “The Diving Bell and the Butterfly: A Memoir of Life in Death” by blinking his left eyelid – the only body part he could move.

Book cover for The Year of Living BiblicallyNot all memoirs are about such serious topics. A.J. Jacobs has made a career out of undergoing challenges and then writing humorously about such challenges. Jacobs has followed the proscriptions and tenets of the Bible (“The Year of Living Biblically: One Man’s Humble Quest to Follow the Bible as Literally as Possible”), implemented rigorous health routines (“Drop Dead Healthy: One Man’s Humble Quest for Bodily Perfection”), volunteered as a subject of science (“The Guinea Pig Diaries: My Life as An Experiment”) and attempted to improve his intellect (“The Know-it-all: One Man’s Humble Quest to Become the Smartest Person in the World”).

There are plenty of memoirs to help you meet your life challenges – whether self-imposed or circumstantial – at your library. These are just a few.

The post Memoirs for Life’s Challenges and Changes appeared first on DBRL Next.

Categories: Book Buzz

Three Ways to Celebrate Audiobook Month

DBRL Next - June 10, 2016

June is audiobook month, as well as the unofficial start of summer travel season. Spice up that long road trip with some good storytelling with a little help from your library!

1. Check out a 2016 Audie Award winner!

Audiobook cover for The Girl on the TrainNamed audiobook of the year, “The Girl on the Train” by Paula Hawkins (narrated by Clare Corbett) was last year’s “Gone Girl.” In this psychological thriller, a woman becomes emotionally entangled in a murder investigation because of something she witnesses on her daily commute. Or try the fiction winner, “The Nightingale” by Kristin Hannah (audiobook narrated by Polly Stone), which follows French sisters Viann and Isabelle as they resist German occupiers during WWII, each in her own way. If nonfiction is more your speed, pick up the winner in history/biography, “A Man on the Moon: The Voyages of the Apollo Astronauts” by Andrew Chaikin (narrated by Bronson Pinchot).

2. Entertain kids with audiobooks in the car.

Audiobook cover for Circus MirandusIf you have little ones in the backseat, check out some family-friendly audiobooks. “Circus Mirandus” by Cassie Beasley is reminiscent of Peter Pan and follows Micah Tuttle who, when he realizes that his grandfather’s stories of an enchanted circus are true, sets out to find the mysterious circus — and to use its magic to save his grandfather’s life. In Chris Grabenstein’s puzzle-filled “Escape From Mr. Lemoncello’s Library,” 12-year-old Kyle gets to stay overnight in the new town library, designed by his hero, the famous gamemaker Luigi Lemoncello.

3. Suggest an audiobook selection for your book club. 

Hoopla is a service available from your library that allows you to stream and download audiobooks (as well as eBooks, comics, movies and television shows). Sign up for an account (this quick start guide shows you how), download the app and borrow up to 10 items per month. Everyone in your book club can borrow the same book on Hoopla – there’s no limit to how many people can borrow an item at once! Try Ben Fountain’s “Billy Lynn’s Long Haftime Walk,” Neil Gaiman’s “The Ocean at the End of the Lane” or “Daring Greatly” by Brené Brown.

Whether you are a long-time fan of audiobooks or new to listening to books, take advantage of your library’s large collection of downloadable audiobooks, books on CD and playaways. Give a book a listen this summer!

The post Three Ways to Celebrate Audiobook Month appeared first on DBRL Next.

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Three Ways to Celebrate Audiobook Month

Next Book Buzz - June 10, 2016

June is audiobook month, as well as the unofficial start of summer travel season. Spice up that long road trip with some good storytelling with a little help from your library!

1. Check out a 2016 Audie Award winner!

Audiobook cover for The Girl on the TrainNamed audiobook of the year, “The Girl on the Train” by Paula Hawkins (narrated by Clare Corbett) was last year’s “Gone Girl.” In this psychological thriller, a woman becomes emotionally entangled in a murder investigation because of something she witnesses on her daily commute. Or try the fiction winner, “The Nightingale” by Kristin Hannah (audiobook narrated by Polly Stone), which follows French sisters Viann and Isabelle as they resist German occupiers during WWII, each in her own way. If nonfiction is more your speed, pick up the winner in history/biography, “A Man on the Moon: The Voyages of the Apollo Astronauts” by Andrew Chaikin (narrated by Bronson Pinchot).

2. Entertain kids with audiobooks in the car.

Audiobook cover for Circus MirandusIf you have little ones in the backseat, check out some family-friendly audiobooks. “Circus Mirandus” by Cassie Beasley is reminiscent of Peter Pan and follows Micah Tuttle who, when he realizes that his grandfather’s stories of an enchanted circus are true, sets out to find the mysterious circus — and to use its magic to save his grandfather’s life. In Chris Grabenstein’s puzzle-filled “Escape From Mr. Lemoncello’s Library,” 12-year-old Kyle gets to stay overnight in the new town library, designed by his hero, the famous gamemaker Luigi Lemoncello.

3. Suggest an audiobook selection for your book club. 

Hoopla is a service available from your library that allows you to stream and download audiobooks (as well as eBooks, comics, movies and television shows). Sign up for an account (this quick start guide shows you how), download the app and borrow up to 10 items per month. Everyone in your book club can borrow the same book on Hoopla – there’s no limit to how many people can borrow an item at once! Try Ben Fountain’s “Billy Lynn’s Long Haftime Walk,” Neil Gaiman’s “The Ocean at the End of the Lane” or “Daring Greatly” by Brené Brown.

Whether you are a long-time fan of audiobooks or new to listening to books, take advantage of your library’s large collection of downloadable audiobooks, books on CD and playaways. Give a book a listen this summer!

The post Three Ways to Celebrate Audiobook Month appeared first on DBRL Next.

Categories: Book Buzz

Wii U Gaming Events

DBRLTeen - June 10, 2016

Wii U Gaming EventsWii U “Mario Cart” Grand Prix
Wednesday, June 22 from 3-4:30 p.m.
Columbia Public Library, Studio

Become a gold cup winner in “Mario Kart 8.” Snacks provided. Ages 10 and older. Parents welcome. Registration required. To sign up, please call (573) 443-3161.

Wii Dance-Off
Thursday, June 30 from 2-3:30 p.m.
Columbia Public Library, Studio

So you think you can dance? Put on your dancing shoes and get ready to cut a rug. We’ll dance our way from the original “Just Dance” game all the way through to “Just Dance 2016”! Snacks provided. Ages 10 and older. Parents welcome. Registration begins June 14. To sign up, please call (573) 443-3161.

Originally published at Wii U Gaming Events.

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Project Teen: Games and Crafts

DBRLTeen - June 8, 2016

Project Teen is a regular program hosted at each of our three library branches. We invite young adults ages 12-18 to join us for craft projects and pizza. In June, you can make your own game using cardboard and other recycled materials, or enjoy retro crafts like Shrinky Dinks, friendship bracelets and sun catchers!

Project Teen: Create a GameYummy Pizza
Friday, June 17 from Noon-1:30 p.m.
Callaway County Public Library
Ages 12-18. No registration required.

Project Teen: Retro Crafts
Monday, June 20 from 1-2:30 p.m.
Columbia Public Library, Studio
Ages 12-18. Registration begins June 7. To sign up, please call (573) 443-3161.

Project Teen: Create a Game
Tuesday, June 28 from 2-3 p.m.
Southern Boone County Public Library
Ages 12 and older. No registration required.

Originally published at Project Teen: Games and Crafts.

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Teen Photo Contest Launches!

DBRLTeen - June 7, 2016

Teen-Photogapher 180 pxUse your camera to capture life in motion. Submit a photo in one of three categories by July 31 for a chance to win a Barnes & Noble gift card. This contest is open to anyone aged 12-18 in Boone and Callaway Counties. Find contest rules and submission guidelines online, or at your library.

Photo credit: Camera by Martinak15 via Flickr. Used under creative commons license.

Originally published at Teen Photo Contest Launches!.

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2016-17 Gateway Award Finalists

Teen Book Buzz - June 3, 2016

2017 Gateway Award Banner

The Gateway Readers Award honors a young adult novel that is selected by Missouri high school students. To be eligible to vote, students must read at least three of the finalists. Voting will occur at participating schools early next March, so you can use the summer months to get crack-a-lackin’ on this list! The winner will be announced in April 2017.

Red Rising” by Pierce Brown
Darrow is a Red, a member of the lowest caste in the color-coded society of the future. Inspired by a longing for justice, and driven by the memory of lost love, Darrow sacrifices everything to infiltrate the legendary Insti-tute, a proving ground for the dominant Gold caste. He will be forced to compete for his life and the very future of civilization against the best and most brutal of Society’s ruling class.

We Were Liars” by E. Lockhart
Spending the summers on her family’s private island off the coast of Massachusetts with her cousins and a special boy named Gat, teen-aged Cadence struggles to remember what happened during her fifteenth summer.

Love and Other Foreign Words” by Erin McCahan
Brilliant fifteen-year-old Josie has a knack for languages, but her sister’s engagement has Josie grappling with the nature of true love, her feelings for her best friend Stu, and how anyone can be truly herself, or truly in love, in a social language that is not her own.

Don’t Look Back” by Jennifer L. Armentrout
Seventeen-year-old Sam seems to have every-thing until she and her best friend, Cassie, disappear one night. Now Sam has returned with amnesia, striving to be a much better person and aware that her not remembering may be the only thing keeping Cassie alive.

The Book of Ivy” by Amy Engel
In an apocalyptic future where girls from the losing faction are forcibly married to boys of the winning faction, sixteen-year-old Ivy is tasked to kill her fiancé Bishop, although when she finally meets him, he is not the monster she has been led to believe.

The Winner’s Curse” by Marie Rutkoski
An aristocratic girl who is a member of a war-mongering and enslaving empire purchases a slave, an act that sets in motion a rebellion that might overthrow her world as well as her heart.

The Young Elites” by Marie Lu
Adelina Amouteru survived the blood fever, a deadly illness that killed many, but left others with strange markings and supernatural powers. Cast out by her family, Adelina joins the secret society of the Young Elites and discovers her own dangerous abilities.

Made for You” by Melissa Marr
Southern small town darling Eva Tilling wakes up in the hospital with the frightening ability to see through the eyes of the victims of a serial killer, and realizes that she, too, is a target of the depraved stalker.

Free to Fall” by Lauren Miller
In a near-future world where everyone is controlled by their smartphones, sixteen-year-old Rory Vaughn suddenly begins listening to the voice within–which kids are taught to ignore– and discovers a terrible plot at the heart of the corporation that makes the devices.

The Kiss of Deception” by Mary E. Pearson
Princess Lia is expected to have the revered gift of sight, but she does not. She knows her parents are perpetrating a sham when they arrange her marriage to a prince she has never met in order to secure an alliance with a neighboring kingdom. Lia flees to a distant village and settles into a new life. Deceptions swirl and Lia finds herself on the brink of unlocking perilous secrets, even as she finds herself falling in love.

Nil” by Lynne Matson
Transported through a “gate” to the mysterious island of Nil, seventeen-year-old Charley has 365 days to escape–or she will die.

Torn Away” by Jennifer Brown
In the aftermath of a tornado that has devastated her hometown of Elizabeth, Missouri, sixteen-year-old Jersey Cameron struggles to overcome her grief as she is sent to live with her only surviving relatives.

Call Me By My Name” by John Ed Bradley
Growing up in Louisiana in the late 1960s, where segregation and prejudice still thrive, two high school football players, one white, one black, become friends, but some changes are too difficult to accept.

Since You’ve Been Gone” by Morgan Matson
Quiet Emily’s sociable and daring best friend, Sloane, has disappeared leaving nothing but a random list of bizarre tasks for her to complete, but with unexpected help from popular classmate Frank Porter, Emily gives them a try.

Some Boys” by Patty Blount
Shunned by her friends and even her father after she accuses the town golden boy of rape, Grace wonders if she can ever trust Ian, a classmate who is funny, kind, and has secrets of his own.

Originally published at 2016-17 Gateway Award Finalists.

Categories: Book Buzz

2016-17 Gateway Award Finalists

DBRLTeen - June 3, 2016

2017 Gateway Award Banner

The Gateway Readers Award honors a young adult novel that is selected by Missouri high school students. To be eligible to vote, students must read at least three of the finalists. Voting will occur at participating schools early next March, so you can use the summer months to get crack-a-lackin’ on this list! The winner will be announced in April 2017.

Red Rising” by Pierce Brown
Darrow is a Red, a member of the lowest caste in the color-coded society of the future. Inspired by a longing for justice, and driven by the memory of lost love, Darrow sacrifices everything to infiltrate the legendary Insti-tute, a proving ground for the dominant Gold caste. He will be forced to compete for his life and the very future of civilization against the best and most brutal of Society’s ruling class.

We Were Liars” by E. Lockhart
Spending the summers on her family’s private island off the coast of Massachusetts with her cousins and a special boy named Gat, teen-aged Cadence struggles to remember what happened during her fifteenth summer.

Love and Other Foreign Words” by Erin McCahan
Brilliant fifteen-year-old Josie has a knack for languages, but her sister’s engagement has Josie grappling with the nature of true love, her feelings for her best friend Stu, and how anyone can be truly herself, or truly in love, in a social language that is not her own.

Don’t Look Back” by Jennifer L. Armentrout
Seventeen-year-old Sam seems to have every-thing until she and her best friend, Cassie, disappear one night. Now Sam has returned with amnesia, striving to be a much better person and aware that her not remembering may be the only thing keeping Cassie alive.

The Book of Ivy” by Amy Engel
In an apocalyptic future where girls from the losing faction are forcibly married to boys of the winning faction, sixteen-year-old Ivy is tasked to kill her fiancé Bishop, although when she finally meets him, he is not the monster she has been led to believe.

The Winner’s Curse” by Marie Rutkoski
An aristocratic girl who is a member of a war-mongering and enslaving empire purchases a slave, an act that sets in motion a rebellion that might overthrow her world as well as her heart.

The Young Elites” by Marie Lu
Adelina Amouteru survived the blood fever, a deadly illness that killed many, but left others with strange markings and supernatural powers. Cast out by her family, Adelina joins the secret society of the Young Elites and discovers her own dangerous abilities.

Made for You” by Melissa Marr
Southern small town darling Eva Tilling wakes up in the hospital with the frightening ability to see through the eyes of the victims of a serial killer, and realizes that she, too, is a target of the depraved stalker.

Free to Fall” by Lauren Miller
In a near-future world where everyone is controlled by their smartphones, sixteen-year-old Rory Vaughn suddenly begins listening to the voice within–which kids are taught to ignore– and discovers a terrible plot at the heart of the corporation that makes the devices.

The Kiss of Deception” by Mary E. Pearson
Princess Lia is expected to have the revered gift of sight, but she does not. She knows her parents are perpetrating a sham when they arrange her marriage to a prince she has never met in order to secure an alliance with a neighboring kingdom. Lia flees to a distant village and settles into a new life. Deceptions swirl and Lia finds herself on the brink of unlocking perilous secrets, even as she finds herself falling in love.

Nil” by Lynne Matson
Transported through a “gate” to the mysterious island of Nil, seventeen-year-old Charley has 365 days to escape–or she will die.

Torn Away” by Jennifer Brown
In the aftermath of a tornado that has devastated her hometown of Elizabeth, Missouri, sixteen-year-old Jersey Cameron struggles to overcome her grief as she is sent to live with her only surviving relatives.

Call Me By My Name” by John Ed Bradley
Growing up in Louisiana in the late 1960s, where segregation and prejudice still thrive, two high school football players, one white, one black, become friends, but some changes are too difficult to accept.

Since You’ve Been Gone” by Morgan Matson
Quiet Emily’s sociable and daring best friend, Sloane, has disappeared leaving nothing but a random list of bizarre tasks for her to complete, but with unexpected help from popular classmate Frank Porter, Emily gives them a try.

Some Boys” by Patty Blount
Shunned by her friends and even her father after she accuses the town golden boy of rape, Grace wonders if she can ever trust Ian, a classmate who is funny, kind, and has secrets of his own.

Originally published at 2016-17 Gateway Award Finalists.

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2016 Teen Summer Reading Challenge

DBRLTeen - June 1, 2016

TSRP 2016 300 pxRegistration for DBRL’s Teen Summer Reading Challenge has begun! Sign up online, or at any of our three library branches or bookmobile stops.

To participate, you must read for 20 hours, share three book reviews and do seven of our suggested activities. Beginning July 5, when you finish, you’ll receive a free book and be entered into a drawing for some other fun rewards including a Kindle Fire!

This program is open to young adults ages 12-18 in Boone and Callaway counties. Summer Reading continues through August 13. 

This year’s Summer Reading theme is “On Your Mark, Get Set, Read!” We will be promoting books and offering programs that focus on wellness, fitness, sports and games of all sorts.

Put on your dancing shoes and join us for a Wii U “Just Dance” dance-off.  Do you love tabletop games? Mark your calendars now for our Mega Gamer Eve in July. Later this summer, enjoy a relaxing yoga practice followed by a yummy smoothie. To receive email reminders of these and other teen events, sign up for our monthly newsletter!

Originally published at 2016 Teen Summer Reading Challenge.

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2016-17 Truman Award Finalists

Teen Book Buzz - May 27, 2016

2017 Truman Award Finalists
The Truman Readers Award honors a book that is selected by Missouri junior high students. To be eligible to vote, students must read at least four of the finalists. Voting will occur at participating schools early next March, so you have plenty of time to knock these titles out like a champ. While the winner won’t be announced until April 2017, this is a great list of summer reads for students in sixth through eighth grade.

Pieces of Me” by Amber Kizer
After a car accident leaves her brain-dead, Jessica tries to prevent her parents from donating her organs and tissues, but then follows the lives of four fellow teens who are able to survive because she did not.

Popular: Vintage Wisdom for a Modern Geek” by Maya Van Wagenen
A touchingly honest, candidly hysterical memoir from breakout teen author Maya Van Wagenen Stuck at the bottom of the social ladder.

Grandmaster” by David Klass
Invited to a parent-child weekend chess tournament, fresh-man Daniel discovers that his father was once one of the country’s leading young players but that the intense competition surrounding the game proved to be unhealthy, a past they are forced to confront when they meet a former rival.

The Body in the Woods” by April Henry
While helping the Portland County Sheriff’s Search and Rescue to seek a missing autistic man, teens Alexis, Nick, and Ruby find, instead, a body and join forces to find the girl’s murderer.

Buzz Kill” by Beth Fantaskey
Seventeen-year-old Millie joins forces with her classmate, gorgeous but mysterious Chase Colton, to try to uncover who murdered head football coach “Hollerin’ Hank” Killdare–and why.

Midnight Thief” by Livia Blackburne
Kyra, a highly skilled seventeen-year-old thief, joins a guild of assassins with questionable motives. Tristam, a young knight, fights against the vicious Demon Riders that are ravaging the city.

Famous Last Words” by Katie Alender
High-school student Willa moves to California and attends a private school. She things that are not really there, like a dead body in the swimming pool, and her visions may be connected to a serial killer that is stalking young girls in Hollywood.

Falls the Shadow” by Stefanie Gaither
When her sister Violet dies, Cate’s wealthy family brings home Violet’s clone, who fits in perfectly until Cate uncovers some-thing sinister about the cloning movement.

Just a Drop of Water” by Kerry O’Malley Cerra
Jake and Sam are best friends, but after the attacks on September 11, their friendship is in danger of crumbling as Sam and his family succumb to hatred for being Muslim American.

I Have a Bad Feeling About This” by Jeff Strand
Everything unathletic sixteen-year-old Henry was dreading about survival camp turns out to be true–or even worse–when armed killers arrive and survival takes on a whole new meaning for the campers.

The Blood Guard” by Carter Roy
Ronan, a seemingly ordinary boy, is swept up in a some-times funny, sometimes scary, but always thrilling advenure, dashing from one danger to the next, using his wits to escape the Bend Sinister, a posse of evildoers with strange powers.

Codename Zero” by Chris Rylander
Carson is a normal teen with a normal life until a desperate man gives him a package with a dire set of instructions. And that package is going to lead Carson to discover that there’s a secret government agency operating in his small, quiet North Dakota hometown.

Originally published at 2016-17 Truman Award Finalists.

Categories: Book Buzz

2016-17 Truman Award Finalists

DBRLTeen - May 27, 2016

2017 Truman Award Finalists
The Truman Readers Award honors a book that is selected by Missouri junior high students. To be eligible to vote, students must read at least four of the finalists. Voting will occur at participating schools early next March, so you have plenty of time to knock these titles out like a champ. While the winner won’t be announced until April 2017, this is a great list of summer reads for students in sixth through eighth grade.

Pieces of Me” by Amber Kizer
After a car accident leaves her brain-dead, Jessica tries to prevent her parents from donating her organs and tissues, but then follows the lives of four fellow teens who are able to survive because she did not.

Popular: Vintage Wisdom for a Modern Geek” by Maya Van Wagenen
A touchingly honest, candidly hysterical memoir from breakout teen author Maya Van Wagenen Stuck at the bottom of the social ladder.

Grandmaster” by David Klass
Invited to a parent-child weekend chess tournament, fresh-man Daniel discovers that his father was once one of the country’s leading young players but that the intense competition surrounding the game proved to be unhealthy, a past they are forced to confront when they meet a former rival.

The Body in the Woods” by April Henry
While helping the Portland County Sheriff’s Search and Rescue to seek a missing autistic man, teens Alexis, Nick, and Ruby find, instead, a body and join forces to find the girl’s murderer.

Buzz Kill” by Beth Fantaskey
Seventeen-year-old Millie joins forces with her classmate, gorgeous but mysterious Chase Colton, to try to uncover who murdered head football coach “Hollerin’ Hank” Killdare–and why.

Midnight Thief” by Livia Blackburne
Kyra, a highly skilled seventeen-year-old thief, joins a guild of assassins with questionable motives. Tristam, a young knight, fights against the vicious Demon Riders that are ravaging the city.

Famous Last Words” by Katie Alender
High-school student Willa moves to California and attends a private school. She things that are not really there, like a dead body in the swimming pool, and her visions may be connected to a serial killer that is stalking young girls in Hollywood.

Falls the Shadow” by Stefanie Gaither
When her sister Violet dies, Cate’s wealthy family brings home Violet’s clone, who fits in perfectly until Cate uncovers some-thing sinister about the cloning movement.

Just a Drop of Water” by Kerry O’Malley Cerra
Jake and Sam are best friends, but after the attacks on September 11, their friendship is in danger of crumbling as Sam and his family succumb to hatred for being Muslim American.

I Have a Bad Feeling About This” by Jeff Strand
Everything unathletic sixteen-year-old Henry was dreading about survival camp turns out to be true–or even worse–when armed killers arrive and survival takes on a whole new meaning for the campers.

The Blood Guard” by Carter Roy
Ronan, a seemingly ordinary boy, is swept up in a some-times funny, sometimes scary, but always thrilling advenure, dashing from one danger to the next, using his wits to escape the Bend Sinister, a posse of evildoers with strange powers.

Codename Zero” by Chris Rylander
Carson is a normal teen with a normal life until a desperate man gives him a package with a dire set of instructions. And that package is going to lead Carson to discover that there’s a secret government agency operating in his small, quiet North Dakota hometown.

Originally published at 2016-17 Truman Award Finalists.

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2016 One READ Winner: About “Bettyville” and George Hodgman

One Read - May 26, 2016
About the Book

Bettyville for web

Bettyville” is a funny, tender memoir about a son coming home to a place he never quite fit to care for his aging mother.

Hodgman, after working for years as an editor in New York City, returns to Paris, Missouri and finds that his hometown and his mother Betty are both in extreme decline. The two share a fierce love, but a deep silence, as Betty has never been able to understand or accept his homosexuality. Hodgman reflects on his recovery from addiction, losing loved ones to the AIDS epidemic and his struggles to care for the still feisty but failing Betty. Funny, honest and tenderhearted, this memoir illuminates how a person is shaped by a family and community that are at once loving and damaging, flawed and beautiful.

About the Author

 Sigrid EstradaGeorge Hodgman grew up in Madison and Paris, Missouri. Hodgman is a veteran magazine and book editor who has worked at Simon & Schuster, Vanity Fair and Talk magazine. His writing has appeared in Entertainment Weekly, Interview, W and Harper’s Bazaar, among other publications. His memoir “Bettyville” was a New York Times bestseller, a Barnes & Noble Discover Great New Writers selection and a National Book Critics Circle Award Finalist. He lives in New York City and Paris, Missouri with his dog Raj.

Biographical info from georgehodgman.com and the Books & Authors Database.

More information:

The post 2016 One READ Winner: About “Bettyville” and George Hodgman appeared first on One Read.

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2016 List of Suggested Titles

One Read - May 26, 2016

Each winter, the public submits suggestions for next year’s One Read book. In January, a panel of community members reviews the suggestions, narrowing that list down to 10 titles, and then chooses two or three books to present for a public vote.

Final 10 Selections

Other Suggested Titles
  • 1984
    George Orwell
  • 100 Questions & Answers About Fibromyalgia
    Sharon Ostalecki
  • $2.00 a day: Living on Almost Nothing in America
    Kathryn J. Edin
  • The Aeronaut’s Windlass
    Jim Butcher
  • All the Light We Cannot See
    Anthony Doerr
  • Almost Perfect
    Brian Katcher
  • At the Water’s Edge
    Sara Gruen
  • The August 5
    Jenna Helland
  • Bad Feminist: Essays
    Roxane Gay
  • Becoming White Smoke: A Tale of Courage and Yearning
    Amanda Kreglow
  • Being Mortal: Medicine and What Matters in the End
    Atul Gawande
  • Beloved
    Toni Morrison
  • Between the World and Me
    Ta-Nehisi Coates
  • Brief Candle in the Dark: My Life in Science
    Richard Dawkins
  • Brown Girl Dreaming
    Jacqueline Woodson
  • The Chaperone
    Laura Moriarty
  • Chasing the Scream: The First and Last Days of the War on Drugs
    Johann Hari
  • Circling the Sun
    Paula McLain
  • The Color of Water
    James McBride
  • Cutting for Stone
    Abraham Verghese
  • The Dark Is Rising
    Susan Cooper
  • The Daughters
    Adrienne Celt
  • The Day the World Came to Town
    Jim DeFede
  • Dead Wake: The Last Crossing of the Lusitania
    Erik Larson
  • Destiny of the Republic: A Tale of Madness, Medicine and the Murder of A President
    Candice Millard
  • A Divine Revelation of Hell
    Mary K. Baxter
  • A Dog’s Purpose
    W. Bruce Cameron
  • The Doll in the Garden
    Mary Downing Hahn
  • The Education of a Traitor
    Svetlana Grobman
  • Eileen
    Ottessa Moshfegh
  • Embassytown
    China Mieville
  • The Emperor of All Maladies: A Biography of Cancer
    Siddhartha Mukherjee
  • Far From You
    Lisa Schroeder
  • Fates and Furies
    Lauren Groff
  • Fifty Shades of Grey
    E.L. James
  • Girl in Translation
    Jean Kwok
  • Give Us the Ballot: The Modern Struggle for Voting Rights in America
    Ari Berman
  • The Giver
    Lois Lowry
  • The Great Controversy Between Christ and Satan
    Ellen White
  • The Heart Goes Last
    Margaret Atwood
  • The Hobbit
    J.R.R. Tolkien
  • Home Grown Stories and Home Fried Lies
    Mitch Jayne
  • I Hunt Killers
    Barry Lyga
  • I, Robot
    Isaac Asimov
  • The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks
    Rebecca Skloot
  • The Infiltrator: My Secret Life Inside the Dirty Banks Behind Pablo Escobar’s Medellin Cartel
    Robert Mazur
  • Just Mercy: A Story of Justice and Redemption
    Bryan Stevenson
  • Kitchens of the Great Midwest
    J. Ryan Stradal
  • Lafayette in the Somewhat United States
    Sarah Vowell
  • Life on the Mississippi
    Mark Twain
  • Limping Through Life: A Farm Boy’s Polio Memoir 
    Jerold Apps
  • The Little Paris Bookshop
    Nina George
  • Little Women
    Louisa May Alcott
  • Lucky Us
    Amy Bloom
  • The Maid’s Version
    Daniel Woodrell
  • Mandela: My Prisoner, My Friend
    Christo Brand
  • The Mark and the Void
    Paul Murray
  • Maya’s Notebook
    Isabel Allende
  • The Memory Weaver
    Jane Kirkpatrick
  • Mercury 13: The True Story of Thirteen Women and the Dream of Space Flight
    Martha Ackmann
  • Mine to Tell
    Colleen Donnelly
  • Missoula: Rape and the Justice System in a College Town
    Jon Krakauer
  • The Nightingale
    Kristin Hannah
  • Nine Days in Heaven
    Dennis & Nolene Prince
  • The No. 1 Ladies’ Detective Agency
    Alexander McCall Smith
  • Nora Webster
    Colm Tóibín
  • Notes From Boomerang Creek
    Cathy Salter
  • Our Declaration: A Reading of the Declaration of Independence in Defense of Equality
    Danielle Allen
  • The Peking Man Is Missing
    Claire Taschdjian
  • Perks of Being a Wallflower
    Stephen Chbosky
  • The Prince
    Vito Bruschini
  • The Prize Winner of Defiance Ohio
    Terry Ryan
  • The Prophet
    Kahlil Gibran
  • Racism Without Racists: Color-blind Racism and the Persistence of Racial Inequality in the United States
    Eduardo Bonilla-Silva
  • Ready Player One
    Ernest Cline
  • Room Temperature
    Nicholson Baker
  • The Sellout
    Paul Beatty
  • The Shallows: What the Internet Is Doing to Our Brains
    Nicholas Carr
  • Sisters in Law: How Sandra Day O’Connor and Ruth Bader Ginsburg Went to the Supreme Court and Changed the World
    Linda R. Hirshman
  • Slaves in the Family
    Edward Ball
  • Snow Flower and the Secret Fan
    Lisa See
  • The Space Between Us
    Thrity Umrigar
  • The Sparrow
    Mary Doria Russell
  • The Story of Beautiful Girl
    Rachel Simon
  • The Stranger’s Child
    Alan Hollinghurst
  • Swamplandia
    Karen Russell
  • This Changes Everything: Capitalism Vs. the Climate
    Naomi Klein
  • Triumph of the City: How Our Greatest Invention Makes Us Richer, Smarter, Greener, Healthier, and Happier
    Edward Glaeser
  • Truth: The Press, the President, and the Privilege of Power
    Mary Mapes
  • The Tsar of Love and Techno
    Anthony Marra
  • Unbroken: A World War II Story of Survival, Resilience, and Redemption
    Laura Hillenbrand
  • Voyage: A Novel of 1896
    Sterling Hayden
  • Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America’s Great Migration
    Isabel Wilkerson
  • We Never Asked for Wings
    Vanessa Diffenbaugh
  • West With the Night
    Beryl Markham
  • What Was Mine
    Helen Klein Ross
  • Where’d You Go, Bernadette?
    Maria Semple
  • Whistling Past the Graveyard
    Susan Crandall
  • Why Evolution Is True
    Jerry A. Coyne
  • A Wilder Rose
    Susan Wittig Albert
  • The Witch of Lime Street: Séance, Seduction, and Houdini in the Spirit World
    David Jaher
  • A Wrinkle in Time
    Madeleine L’Engle
  • Your Inner Fish: A Journey Into the 3.5-Billion-Year History of the Human Body
    Neil Shubin

The post 2016 List of Suggested Titles appeared first on One Read.

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Explore Electronics with Snap Circuits

DBRLTeen - May 24, 2016

Circuit Science: TeenSnap Circuit
Columbia Public Library, Studio
Tuesday, June 7 from 2-3 p.m. –OR– 6-7 p.m.

Use Snap Circuits and our new Snap Rovers to discover the basics of electrical circuits. In this session, we’ll create a “Morse Code Generator,” construct an “Easy Rover” and more. Ages 12-18. Registration begins Tuesday, May 31. To sign up, please call (573) 443-3161.

Originally published at Explore Electronics with Snap Circuits.

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Top Ten Books Librarians Love: The June 2016 List

Next Book Buzz - May 23, 2016

Library Reads LogoAh, June is coming! We can smell summer from here. Time to stuff our beach bags with a little romantic comedy, fantasy (featuring librarians, naturally), suspense, memoir and microhistory. Here are the books hitting shelves next month that librarians across the country recommend. Place your holds now to have them in hand for your upcoming vacations or staycations.

Book cover for Vinegar GirlVinegar Girl” by Anne Tyler
“The newest entry in the Hogarth Shakespeare series brings The Taming of the Shrew into the modern world. Kate is stuck in a life taking care of her absent minded professor father and her sister, Bunny. When her father suggests a marriage of convenience in order to secure a green card for his lab assistant Pyotr, Kate is shocked. This is a sweet and humorous story about two people, who don’t quite fit in, finding each other. Tyler’s wonderful writing updates and improves on the original.” – Catherine Coyne, Mansfield Public Library, Mansfield, MA

Book cover for The Invisible LibraryThe Invisible Library” by Genevieve Cogman
“Directed by powerful librarians, agents roam alternate realities searching out special volumes for their mysterious library’s collections. Irene is a spy for the library but something is a little off about her current mission; there’s something strange about her new assistant that she can’t quite put her finger on and worse, the requested volume has already been stolen. Cogman’s engaging characters and a most intriguing imagined world are sure to delight readers, especially bibliophiles.” – Beth Mills, New Rochelle Public Library, New Rochelle, NY

Book cover for Under the HarrowUnder the Harrow” by Flynn Berry
“Nora leaves London to visit her sister, Rachel, in the countryside often. But this trip is different – a silent house, a dead dog hanging from the railing and so much blood. Nora stays, trying to help the police solve the case. She thinks it might have something to do with the unsolved attack on Rachel when she was just a teen but it could be someone new. This story is thrilling and quietly gripping. We become as obsessed as Nora in finding her sister’s killer — what if he strikes again?” – Kimberly McGee, Lake Travis Community Library, Austin, TX

And here’s the rest of the list for your holds-placing pleasure!

The post Top Ten Books Librarians Love: The June 2016 List appeared first on DBRL Next.

Categories: Book Buzz

Barnes & Noble Teen Book Festival

DBRLTeen - May 20, 2016

B-Fest_icon_largeBarnes and Noble Bookstore 
Columbia Mall, 2208 Bernadette Dr.
June 10-12

Barnes & Noble will be hosting their first-ever Teen Book Festival from June 10-12. The event will include author events, writing workshops, panel discussions, trivia, games and giveaways. Special guests include Missouri authors Brian Katcher and Sarah Jude. For more information, contact Lisa LoPorto at (573) 445-4080, or visit the Barnes & Noble website.

Originally published at Barnes & Noble Teen Book Festival.

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Wii U Family Game Time on May 27

DBRLTeen - May 18, 2016

Wii-U-Gamepad-gameplayWii U Family Game Time
Friday, May 27, 4-5:30 p.m.
Columbia Public Library, Studio

Become a dancing superstar in Just Dance 2015, a gold cup winner in “Mario Kart 8” or a party animal in “Mario Party 10.” Snacks provided. Ages 10 and older. Parents welcome. Registration required. To sign-up, please call (573) 443-3161.

Originally published at Wii U Family Game Time on May 27.

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