Reader Review: The Silent Sister

Posted on Friday, January 6, 2017 by patron reviewer

Editor’s note: This review was submitted by a library patron during the 2016 Adult Summer Reading program. We will continue to periodically share some of these reviews throughout the year.

Silent Sister book coverThe Silent Sister” follows Riley, a girl in her early 20s, who just lost her father. She is left to deal with his estate with little help from her mentally ill and disabled veteran brother. While doing so, she uncovers a lot of family secrets and discovers things about herself she had never known before. I liked this book because it kept me entertained. I had figured out some of the ending early on, but there was still a twist within that ending, and I liked that. The characters were well-developed and each held a piece to the puzzle. Continue reading “Reader Review: The Silent Sister”

Reader Review: The Nerdy Nummies Cookbook

Posted on Friday, December 2, 2016 by patron reviewer

Editor’s note: This review was submitted by a library patron during the 2016 Adult Summer Reading program. We will continue to periodically share some of these reviews throughout the year.

Nerdy Nummies Cookbook book coverRosanna Pansino has a very successful YouTube channel called “Nerdy Nummies,” where she bakes treats inspired by her favorite TV shows, videos games and other “nerdy” topics. “The Nerdy Nummies Cookbook” starts with a handful of basic recipes that she uses to create all of her treats. After giving you the basic foundation of recipes, tools and decorating supplies you will need, the author divides her cookbook by topic: Math & Science, Space, Fantasy & Sci-Fi, Gaming, Tech & Web and Geeky Treats. Continue reading “Reader Review: The Nerdy Nummies Cookbook”

Reader Review: How to Start a Fire

Posted on Friday, November 25, 2016 by patron reviewer

Editor’s note: This review was submitted by a library patron during the 2016 Adult Summer Reading program. We will continue to periodically share some of these reviews throughout the year.

How to start a fire book cover

How to Start a Fire” follows three women who meet in college and continue their sometimes difficult friendship over the course of many years. The women have very different personalities but are tied together by a chance meeting which occurred during their college years. I liked the fact the book followed the women throughout their lives and showed their struggles and triumphs. Main portions of the book are slowly revealed through flashbacks with the book coming together at the end. As the book moved through various time periods it was sometimes slightly difficult to follow. Continue reading “Reader Review: How to Start a Fire”

Reader Review: My Grandmother Asked Me to Tell You She’s Sorry

Posted on Friday, October 14, 2016 by patron reviewer

Editor’s note: This review was submitted by a library patron during the 2016 Adult Summer Reading program. We will continue to periodically share some of these reviews throughout the year.

my grandmotherMy Grandmother Asked Me to Tell You She’s Sorry” is about the life of young Elsa as told through the fairy tales her grandmother tells her. 7-year-old Elsa, soon to be 8, is lonely, bullied, different, extremely smart and counts her Grandma as her best friend. Well, make that her only friend. When Grandma dies, the stories begin to unravel. Elsa is tasked to solve the mysteries of where Grandma’s letters are hidden and then to deliver the letters — regardless of the challenge and danger — to all the people Grandma needs to tell she is sorry. Continue reading “Reader Review: My Grandmother Asked Me to Tell You She’s Sorry”

Reader Review: Red Rising

Posted on Friday, August 26, 2016 by patron reviewer

Editor’s note: This review was submitted by a library patron during the 2016 Adult Summer Reading program. We will continue to periodically share some of these reviews throughout the year.

red risingIn his debut novel (and the first in the Red Rising trilogy), Pierce Brown introduces a dystopian story that should appeal to readers who enjoyed the Hunger Games trilogy. Teenaged Darrow lives in an under-earth colony on Mars that toils to make the surface livable for future inhabitants. Oppressive rule is all he’s known, but a dramatic turn of events soon forces Darrow to fight for a better life for his community. If that sounds a bit cliche, I suppose it’s because I didn’t find much new to keep my interest in this story. Other than the setting and the sex of the main character, it feels very much like “Hunger Games: Catching Fire.” Whereas that was the second book in a trilogy (with the benefit of the slow-build to revolutionary action and character development from the first book), this book seems to move the reader quickly down Darrow’s (stealth) revolutionary path. I found it difficult to feel empathy for the main character’s motivations without experiencing more of his world before he took steps toward revolution. I think I’m in the minority in not caring for this book, though, so if you like dystopian novels, give it a try! Continue reading “Reader Review: Red Rising”

Reader Review: Cutting for Stone

Posted on Thursday, August 11, 2016 by patron reviewer

book cover for cutting for stoneCutting for Stone” is about doctors of mostly Indian heritage working in a mission hospital in Africa. The main characters are endearing, though sometimes we become saddened or frustrated with them. Most of the doctors are surgeons, and we are privy to the intricate details of some of the surgeries. I liked this book because I found the characters heart-warming, and I learned quite a bit of what goes on in the operating room. Interesting surgical details, without disturbing the story line. Continue reading “Reader Review: Cutting for Stone”

Reader Review: Cake Pops

Posted on Tuesday, August 9, 2016 by patron reviewer

cake pops cookbookCake Pops” by Bakerella is a wonderfully inspirational book that definitely inspired me to be more adventurous and creative in the kitchen. The author shares her baking passion with the reader in a way that is fun and easy to relate to. The book runs through different cake pop methods, tools you need, and lays out step-by-step how to create the perfect cake balls. The author then goes through a number of tutorials for different designs — pandas, froggies, pumpkins, etc. What I liked about this book is that it gave me so many new ideas and tricks. I can’t wait to try some of the recipes and practice in my own kitchen. My only dislike, the reason it was given four stars instead of five, is that I would have preferred more step-by-step photos. I learn best from reading instructions and seeing a photo of the step. If you are an individual who learns best by simply reading the instructions, then this will not be a problem for you. Continue reading “Reader Review: Cake Pops”

Reader Review: A Box of Matches

Posted on Thursday, August 4, 2016 by patron reviewer

box of matchesFor the most part, the chapters in “A Box of Matches” are glorious little nuggets of observation. Even if I can’t specifically relate to every idea that is brought up (for example, the notion of needing to think suicidal thoughts in order to fall asleep), the process by which these thoughts arise feels universal. AND so many of these ponderings are exactly in line with things I’ve considered — such as deciding to sit down to pee in the middle of the night or the excruciating loveliness of watching your own children grow up.

I do feel like the book loses a little of its momentum by the end. Plus, the simple nature of this style of writing (without a real plot) makes it so that some of the passages will resonate more than others. But on the whole, Baker has crafted another (“The Mezzanine” and “Room Temperature“) fantastic little book of pensiveness. Continue reading “Reader Review: A Box of Matches”

Reader Review: The Flicker Men

Posted on Tuesday, August 2, 2016 by patron reviewer

flicker menThe Flicker Men” is about a troubled research physicist who stumbles on a surprising truth about the universe and the hidden mechanisms that run our everyday lives. In doing so he uncovers the invisible world of the Flicker Men and their influence on everything. I liked this book because it was real world science fiction with a lot of physics thrown in and because the author wasn’t afraid to go down some very deep physical and metaphysical tunnels.

Three words that describe this book: adventure, quantum physics, sci-fi

You might want to pick this book up if: You enjoy reading the works of Einstein or Asimov with a touch of Ludlum.

-Chris

Reader Review: Why Be Happy When You Could Be Normal?

Posted on Thursday, July 28, 2016 by patron reviewer

why be happy when you could be normalAnyone familiar with Jeanette Winterson (“Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit“) has heard some of her story before. “Why Be Happy When You Could Be Normal?” is a memoir of a rough time with her family that leads to a level of hope and resilience that is inspirational and satisfying to read. I knew much of the author’s story from other books of hers, but it was compelling to hear her tell her own story in her own voice. I loved her description of wanting to be a big writer and her development as a feminist.

While Winterson ultimately leaves the fundamentalist Christian faith of her family, she doesn’t look back on it with complete harshness or despair. Instead, she describes religion and religious community as infusing life with something larger than mundane daily existence and providing a forum for discussion of philosophy, ethics and politics. Has religion moved away from these goals today?

I’m so glad to have had the chance to read this one.

Three words that describe this book: inspiring, heart-breaking, literary

You might want to pick this book up if: you want to read about the power of literature to bring redemption, you want to know more about this fabulous author, or you want to listen to an author read her own memoir.

-Anonymous