New to the Kitchen? Check Out These Cookbooks!

Posted on Tuesday, November 23, 2021 by Stellan Harris

It’s the time of year where the ovens are on, the smell of warm spices waft through the air, and many home kitchens will be buzzing with activity. Getting involved in the kitchen can be an intimidating prospect, though, especially if you don’t have too much experience cooking for yourself, let alone others. Well if you’ve ever thought about getting some more experience in the kitchen, I’ve collected a few cookbooks that are great resources to consult to get you started. The books range in difficulty, from books for those of us who are more familiar with a microwave than a pan on the stove, to books for those of use looking for the next fancy dish to post for your friends and followers, so wherever you land on the culinary spectrum you should find something for you on this list. Good luck, and happy cooking!

The Complete Cookbook for Young Chefs

For our readers who are absolutely brand new to cooking, who’ve lived off family meals, take out, and things from a microwave, this is the book to start with. It’s aimed at a slightly younger audience than the other books on this list, but for the aspiring chef who’s just starting out? You’d struggle to find a better introduction to cooking for yourself. With a wide variety of recipes, clear and basic instructions, and recipe delineations for difficulty and equipment required, this cookbook does its absolute best to set you up for success in the kitchen. So, if you’re brand new to cooking outside of a microwave and want to have a bit more say in what you’re eating? Start here. 

Recommended Recipe: Spicy BLT Wrap, pg. 82. Simple ingredients, quick prep time, and delicious!

 

Super Easy Teen Cookbook

This is another cookbook for our less-experienced chefs, holding 75 recipes aimed at teens with step-by-step instructions for a wide variety of recipes. This book handles some areas that the previous book did not cover, namely a number of recipes for meatless meals, and the general writing level is a bit higher than the previous title. Still, while it lacks a clear delineation of difficulty on a recipe-by-recipe basis, this cookbook covers a breadth of recipes at a level that should help any aspiring chef begin their culinary career. Use this book after, or in tandem with, the previous cookbook to build a solid foundation of culinary skill until you feel comfortable enough to branch out a little bit, in which case the next book has you covered. 

Recommended Recipe:The Perfect Omelet, pg. 19. Mastering a good omelet opens up a whole world of delicious breakfasts for you and anyone you want to impress!

Hack Your Cupboard

This cookbook is one of my favorites, because it aims to solve one of the most common barriers that teens can bump up against when they decide they want to start cooking: buying the ingredients. While not as expensive as eating out on a regular basis, it can be expensive buying specialty ingredients to try out recipes that, in the end, you might find you don’t even particularly like. That’s where this cookbook comes in! Centered around building straightforward recipes with things that you can acquire relatively cheaply and easily, this book also spends some time teaching you techniques that you can apply more widely once you’ve got some room to experiment. This cookbook serves as a nice intermediate step for our burgeoning step, with a little less handholding and a few more techniques to present, so give this book a shot when you’re looking for the next step!

Recommended Recipe: Drop Biscuits, pg. 95. While a bit more complex, these biscuits come together with only a few ingredients and will beat the heck out of Pilsbury any day of the week!


Speedy Bosh

This cookbook is definitely for the more intermediate chefs among us, but even a book like this has some great tips and tricks that we can all use to improve our cooking. Focusing on recipes that are simple, easy, and plant-focused, this cookbook will help both chefs who are living with dietary restrictions and those who are just looking to eat a bit more vegetables without resorting to steamed mush or less than appealing salads. My biggest problem with eating vegetables has always been I never learned how to cook them properly, so a book like this will definitely help make incorporating more plants into my diet less of a chore, with a side benefit of giving me some valuable recipes for when I want to have my vegan friends over for dinner. If that sounds useful to you, or if you just want to check out some quick and easy tips to improve your cooking, check out this book. 

Recommended Recipe: Salsa Gnocchi, pg. 83. A homemade salsa-inspired sauce, crispy gnocchi, and options to expand in ways that fit your tastes? It’s hard not to recommend this recipe for your first meat-free outing. 

Binging with Babish

So, this last book recommendation is a bit of an outlier. This cookbook isn’t aimed at teens, isn’t aimed at beginners, and has some recipes with rather complex preparation. Think of this cookbook more as a gateway to further culinary experimentation. This book, and the associated youtube channel, feature recipes inspired by, or sometimes taken directly from, pop culture properties like movies, tv shows, video games, and books. With recipes from Spongebob, Stranger Things, Game of Thrones and the Godfather (some of these references run old, the author is in his 30s) there are a lot of quality recipes in here. Plus, the author’s youtube channel has videos of him cooking every recipe in this book, for all of the chefs who are more visual learners. So, for all of our more experienced teen chefs, this book has some things to show you to help you elevate your food game when you’re ready for the challenge. 

Recommended Recipe: Chicken Parm Heros, pg.260. Fried chicken, melted mozzarella, tomato sauce, all on garlic bread? While far from healthy, this meal will ask a bit of skill from you to get everything together, but the final result is a delicious italian-american staple that will delight your friends and family alike. Or make some really great lunches for a while, it’s up to you. 

Looking for more books to help get your culinary kicks? Check out our blog post featuring a book list chock full of books and cookbooks to satisfy your foodie fix here

FAFSA Frenzy 2021

Posted on Tuesday, October 5, 2021 by Stellan Harris

FAFSA FrenzyThe Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA, is the primary application used by all colleges and universities to determine your eligibility for grants, loans, work-study and scholarships. More importantly, this form is mandatory for all those planning to attend college.

The Missouri Department of Higher Education has an assistance program called FAFSA Frenzy to help you and your family successfully complete this online application form. They will be hosting several free events at mid-Missouri high schools. If you are planning to attend college in the fall, mark your calendars now for one of these four sessions.

Get all your financial aid concerns out of the way so you can be all set for the 2022-2023 school year!
Continue reading “FAFSA Frenzy 2021”

Happy TeenTober!

Posted on Friday, October 1, 2021 by Stellan Harris

TeenTober Logo

Happy TeenTober dear readers! TeenTober is a month-long celebration promoted by the Young Adult Library Service Association (YALSA) that strives to bring attention to the ways that libraries can better serve their young adult readers with programs and services. Here at DBRL we thought we’d take this month as an opportunity to highlight the contributions the teens in our community make to our library by publishing some of the many book reviews we received from our teen users during Summer Reading. Every Friday we’ll showcase a few of the reviews, and the books that they examine, in an effort to highlight the voices of the teens in our community. Keep an eye on our Events page for other TeenTober programs and festivities, and sign up to our Teen Newsletter to stay up to date with all things YA at DBRL!

New Teen Resources @ DBRL

Posted on Tuesday, August 31, 2021 by Stellan Harris

Daniel Boone Regional Library is excited to let you know about some new resources available to you as part of your access to our library services! 

Teen Health & Wellness

Teen Health and Wellness is a great resource for teens looking to learn more about their health and how to manage their mental health. With resources for health questions that teens might have, mental health resources to deal with a host of issues that teens might face, and a calm room that includes resources for calming and meditation (including live streams of puppies and kittens!), this is a great resource for any teen to consult when needed. I can personally vouch for the benefits of watching a livestream of puppies and kittens having a good time when things get tough, so do yourself a favor and check out this resource!

Digital Literacy

In our increasingly complex information environment, with misinformation becoming both easier and more widespread than ever. Serving that need, Digital Literacy is a host of articles and resources that seek to increase the digital literacy of teens today. From advice on what looking for employment online, to relationships on the internet, and many other online situations, this resource is a great place to check if you’re concerned about uniquely online situations. While most teens are pretty internet savvy, it’s always good to have a resource to consult for emerging situations that your teen might not have encountered before. 

Financial Literacy

Financial literacy is an incredibly important knowledge base, especially for teens who might just be entering the job market. Yet, for something so important, it’s deceptively hard for the average teen to learn the financial literacy skills they would need to succeed. That’s where this resource comes in! This resource is a collection of articles, advice, and news pieces related to all things financial. From understanding the way the stock market works, and influences our lives, to tools for budgeting and personal finances, to advice for teens interested in entrepreneurship and careers in finance, this resource is a great way to gain skills related to money management for teens who don’t have them already. 

Practice for Your Driver’s License Exam

Posted on Thursday, May 28, 2020 by Brandy

Through our partnership with Driving-Tests.org, the Daniel Boone Regional Library can help you get your Missouri driver’s license. With this service, all library cardholders have online access to the Missouri driver’s manual and free practice exams.

You will need to log in using your DBRL library card number. Your PIN is your birthdate (MMDDYYYY). If you have questions or encounter difficulties logging in, please call (573) 443-3161 or 1-800-324-4806.